VMware or Parallels?

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by jaybar, Oct 24, 2015.

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  1. jaybar macrumors 6502

    jaybar

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    #1
    hi

    I want to run Windows under either VMware or Parallels. I do not want to share my Mac desktop with my windows virtual machine.

    I only need to run Windows to access my office computer.

    I am using the new Apple magic keyboard and Magic Mouse 2.

    Will these present a problem for either VMware or Parallels? Is VMware superior to Parallels? Is Parallels superior to VMware?

    Do both support the latest version of both windows and the latest version of OS X?

    I have a late 2013 iMac 27 inch with 16GB of RAM. IT HAS a 1TB spinning drive. I will need to purchase Wibdows. Which version should I purchase? I do not qualify for the upgrade.

    Thanks in advance.

    Jay
     
  2. mdlooker macrumors 65816

    mdlooker

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    Location:
    US
    #2
    I can't add any added value to you other than this. I'm trying to decide whether to use VM Ware vs Boot Camp vs Parallels.

    I googled, saw and listened to some youtube and it seems parallels is the choice of many because apparently Bootcamp requires you to restart your computer to use either version independently (just my interpretation thus far) whereas parallels you can run concurrently w/o the need to restart your computer. Again just from what I can tell thus far.

    In terms of parallels in comparison to VMWare, benchmarks seem to show Parallels overall having better scores than VMWare.

    Check it out for yourself though..

     
  3. MagicBoy macrumors 68040

    MagicBoy

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    #3
    I've used both at various times since they launched. I'd go with Parallels. VMWares strengths lie in running in non-Windows OS.
     
  4. chscag macrumors 68000

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    Location:
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    #4
    If all you need Windows for is to remote access to your office computer, why spend $$ on Parallels or Fusion? Instead, download the free VirtualBox from Oracle which will work fine and it's easy to setup.

    I have the same machine and it can run Windows 7, 8, 8.1, or 10. Personally I would go with either the full install version of Windows 7 or 10. I'm not sure VirtualBox supports Windows 10 yet so if you decide on using it, you'll need to find that out first; otherwise stick with Windows 7. You'll also need to install Windows using a bootable ISO on either a flash drive or external hard drive since your iMac has no optical drive.
     
  5. doynton macrumors 6502

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    #5
    Windows 10 works just fine on VirtualBox.

    As for which version of Windows it is probably cheaper to buy 7 or 8 and do the free upgrade rather than pay full price for 10. It is probably also worth geting a retail (transferable) Windows license - otherwise you will be tied to the same virtualisation software forever. If you get a retail license you can move your install from Virtualbox to VMWare later if you want to.
     
  6. takeshi74 macrumors 601

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    Feb 9, 2011
    #6
    Don't overlook the countless prior threads on this topic. If one was universally superior then we'd all use it and no one would use the other. Reality indicates that's clearly not the case.

    There's more to consider than just that. With virtualization like Fusion and Parallels there's overhead that doesn't exist with Boot Camp. It's possible to both Boot Camp and use Fusion or Parallels if one needs both.
     
  7. dyn macrumors 68030

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    #7
    If you all you need is to access another computer then you shouldn't even be using virtualisation software. You need to have remote control software like Teamviewer, VNC or Microsoft RDP because they allow you to connect to a remote computer. Virtualisation software does none of that, it only allows you to run other operating systems from within OS X.
     
  8. jaybar thread starter macrumors 6502

    jaybar

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    #8
    Hi

    I do not have work authorization to do that. My question remains the same. VMware or Parallels or Bootcamp.
     
  9. Gjwilly macrumors 68030

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    Location:
    SF Bay Area
    #9
    Get VMWare.
    The two products are a pure toss-up in performance and features so support the one that supports its customers better.
    Parallels allows only one computer per license.
    VMWare allows three computers per license and has a more generous upgrade program.
     
  10. daniesy macrumors member

    daniesy

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    Location:
    Mars
    #10
    Why not Virtual Box? It's free and it works great.
    However, between the two you mentioned, i find Parallels running better on a Mac. It depends on what you need the virtual machine for.
     
  11. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    #11
    Age old question and since both offer free trials, why not try both. I also second the recommendation for Virtual Box, its free and has come a long way. Its a viable alternative.
     
  12. Crazy Badger macrumors 65816

    Crazy Badger

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    #12
    I've tried Parallels in the past, and currently use a combination of Bootcamp (if I want to run Window natively on my MBA), VMware (if I want to run Windows or other VMs in OSX) and VirtualBox (which I use on my FreeNAS server to run several Linux VMs and a Windows 10 one that's on 24/7).

    So it's really not a simple question of which is best, it's more about which is most appropriate for what you're looking to do. I switched from Parallels to VMware mainly down to their licensing and upgrade frequency, which I didn't like, rather than any missing functionality.
     
  13. daniesy macrumors member

    daniesy

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    #13
    Also if you're a web developer, Virtual Box will come in handy for setting up virtual php servers (with Vagrant).
     
  14. dyn macrumors 68030

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    #14
    Then don't circumvent it unless you like to get fired.
     
  15. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

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    #15
    He's not circumventing it. He's asking a question about what VM is better. Remote software is not permitted so he's following his company's procedure.
     
  16. dyn macrumors 68030

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    #16
    Then you clearly missed the following from his first post:
    The only way to access a computer that way is by remote software which is not permitted by his company. Trying anything to access that computer remotely is thus against company policy. He is clearly circumventing it. If he wishes to do so then that is his choice, he's the one running the risk of getting fired, not me ;)

    In some cases it might even be unlawful to do so. From a sysadmin and security point of view I can tell you that there are very good reasons not to allow remote access to computers at work. Regulations are one but certifications the company holds is another as well as demands by (certain) customers and/or suppliers. Not following this could mean a fine, lawsuit, losing the customer and so on. In some cases this is just your basic security where you simply need to apply for it. They do it to reduce the amount of "holes" in the infrastructure.
     
  17. jaybar, Nov 6, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2015

    jaybar thread starter macrumors 6502

    jaybar

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    #17
    The person that was so sure I was trying to do something mproper has nerve beyond belief. to insinuate that publicly. Whoever you are, if you are so sure of what I am doing and so conserved about my welfare then private email me first before coming to a conclusion. I am livid.
     
  18. dyn macrumors 68030

    Joined:
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    Location:
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    #18
    Ah so whatever you said in posts #1 and #8 regarding not having permission to access the machine remotely is not correct after all? Then again: there is no need for virtualisation software, use the appropriate remote access software. If you are not allowed to use it, then don't circumvent it by using a virtualised environment to access it. Or in other words: you may want to tell the actual story and tell it properly because it is not very clear what you are actually wanting to accomplish.
     
  19. jaybar, Nov 6, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2015

    jaybar thread starter macrumors 6502

    jaybar

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    #19
    Moderator please close this thread.

    The system that I am authorized to use is webmail based and theoretically should work with any browser and also work with both Macs and Windows machines. However, for better or worse, it seems to function best, and sometimes only with using Windows and Internet Explorer, because of Java related issues. At the time I originally posted, I was exploring the wisdom of using Bootcamp vs virtualization on my iMac.

    My intent, at the time of my post was to raise issues pertaining to the best way to implement Windows on a Mac.

    Because my need to access will be infrequent, I decided that the initial and subsequent cost for either Parallels or VMware, might not be justified in my case. I took advantage of their free trials and ultimately concluded that for the relatively few times I needed to make use of Windows and I.E., that Bootcamp would be more cost effective, albeit a slight hassle to reboot. I HAVE NO desire to explore Virtual Box. Don't even suggest it.

    I deeply resent any statements relative to that I might be engaging in anything unauthorized. In light of that, I request this thread to be closed, if at all possible.
     
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