W7 Bootcamp: Poor Windows Experience Index on 2008 MBP

Discussion in 'Windows, Linux & Others on the Mac' started by jb60606, Jan 4, 2010.

  1. jb60606 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Location:
    Chicago
    #1
    I have a 2008 MacBook Pro (not Unibody). I ran all updates for MacOS X (SL 10.6.2) and Windows 7. The CPU element of the Windows Experience Index clocks in at 3.9. All other elements tested, clock in the low 5s or higher.

    Late 2008 MacBook Pro (MB133LL/A):
    CPU: 2.4Ghz Core2Duo (3MB L2 cache, 800Mhz Bus speed)
    RAM: 6GB 677MHz DDR2 (1x4GB, 1x2GB)
    Video: NVIDIA GeForce 8600M GT with 256 MB of GDDR3

    OS: Windows 7 Professional x86_64, via "Windows Anytime Upgrade" from Windows Home Premium

    Is anyone else getting similar CPU performance results?
     
  2. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
    Location:
    Boston
    #2
    My 2.53 Unibody MBP has a CPU index 5.9 or in the 6s (I forget exactly) as I run mostly in vmware and so the overhead of virtualization drags down the numbers a bit.
     
  3. daltaya macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2009
    #3
    sounds like you need to change the power settings to high performance
     
  4. jb60606 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Location:
    Chicago
    #4
    Didn't help: still stuck at 3.9. I downloaded SiSoft Sandra and benchmark results were barely half the numbers they have on file for the exact same processor. I've since uninstalled W7 x86_64 and installed the W7 x86 (32bit) OS natively (bootcamp), then VMware, and I'm still getting the same results.

    EDIT: Xbench just revealed a CPU score of about half of what everyone else is getting with identical models. Both of my CPU cores are operational (at least, according to activity monitor and iStat). CPU seems to be running at about 128 degrees, idle. Does anyone have any tips?
     
  5. jb60606 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Location:
    Chicago
    #5
    I think I found my answer:

    http://www.tomshardware.com/news/apple-macbook-pro-battery-benchmarks,6643.html

    Coincidentally, they ran the benchmarks on the exact same hardware as mine. It looks like - regardless of whether or not it's running on AC adapter - if you remove the MacBook Pro's battery, the laptop automatically "down-clocks" the CPU. Apparently, the AC adapter lacks an adequate amount juice to power the laptop on its own, and therefore requires a battery to fully utilize both CPUs.

    My battery died about 1 month ago and cannot hold a charge. To test the theory, I shut down bluetooth and airport, ran my CPU tests again and they consistently came in at about 7-10pts higher (77+/- before, 85+/- after). I should be getting about 140, according to Xbench.

    It would be nice if Apple warned us about this (or any other manufacturer that implements the same). It's remarkable that the laptop can run at full power on battery alone, but only half-assed on AC. Considering Apple's reputation with batteries, I'll likely have to purchase a new battery every 1yrs, to keep this thing running despite the fact that it probably won't leave my desk (or AC power).
     
  6. jb60606 thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Location:
    Chicago
    #6
    Installed a new battery and my CPU score jumped 66% in Xbench.
     

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