Wacom Intuos Pro and MacBook Pro Retina 15"

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by peterpan123, Jan 18, 2015.

  1. peterpan123 macrumors 6502

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    #1
    Hello, I am considering to buy either the special edition (medium) or the large version of Intuos Pro. Currently, I am using the MacBook Pro Retina 15". I plan to add a large screen monitor (probably 27" or so) few months later. In this case, is it advisable to get the large version? Will there be compatibility issue (e.g. matching the resolutions of both devices) between the rMBP 15" and the Intuos Pro Large? Thanks.
     
  2. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    Aug 5, 2010
    #2
    Display resolution is irrelevant. The medium has an 8.8" x 5.5" active area according to their specifications. Everymac has 20.3" x 25.6" x 8" as the dimensions for the newest imac, but viewable area would be less than 20.3 x 25. I can't seem to find that. Anyway the distance your cursor moves will differ from your hand movement. I always found that irritating when it came to any fine detailing or masking. Your results may vary. Even with a 15" rmbp I would be fine with a large tablet, because the tablet wouldn't exceed the size of the display. Just make sure you have the room to use one comfortably if you decide to go that route. Note that if you set it to work across both displays simultaneously in a tiled manner, it will feel weird no matter what due to the difference in aspect ratio. If you check "force proportions" under those circumstances, it will crop the tablet area in use.
     
  3. peterpan123 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #3
    Thanks. What do you mean by "tiled manner"?
     
  4. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #4
    If you have display mirroring disabled for your external, your built in and external displays will show different content. You can set up the tablet to stretch across both, but that (to me) feels really really weird. I prefer as close to a 1:1 mapping of tablet area to screen area as possible. Others disagree with me on this, but I found I could be much more accurate that way.
     
  5. peterpan123 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #5
    Thanks. I plan to use it to design things using SolidWorks, Autodesk Inventor and 3D Max. Shall I go for the Introus Pro Large? Don't know when I will be given the money to buy a large external monitor. It might take months or longer.
     
  6. 960design macrumors 68000

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    Destin, FL
    #6
    I cannot speak for your personal style, but I had a Wacom Pro Large and found it too big ( my hand had to make uncomfortably large strokes ). I recently purchased the medium pro and it seems to be just about right.

    I'm using a late 2013 MBPr 15".
     
  7. peterpan123 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #7

    I heard that for the large one, the user can make the drawing area smaller.
     
  8. peterpan123 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #8
  9. campyguy macrumors 68030

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    #9
    I'm not various people, but I have been a Wacom tablet user since the ADB port days, about 15 years or so. I'm using a medium-sized tablet on either of my two rMBPs, and use either a 27-inch monitor or 40-inch HDTV as a monitor, and the medium tablet suits me just fine. FWIW, I'm also 6'7" - and I like bigger things as they just make me feel "normal", but not in a Wacom Tablet! I've also used a medium Wacom tablet with my old 17" Macbook Pro and 27" iMac - no problems.

    You'll find that you'll adapt very quickly to a medium tablet. I've also bought a small Intuos for when I travel. The software driver allows for switching between "mouse mode" and "Full mode", and per-application settings, and includes a utility to save your preferences.

    The large tablet is too frickin' large for 99% of what I use it for, some video, some image editing, lots of office work, and some web stuff. I know a guy who bought a large tablet, and then exchanged it for a medium-sized tablet.

    I am considering a large Wacom tablet, but it's going to be the new Cintiq. Without the touch option :mad:.
     
  10. peterpan123 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #10
    Thanks. One of my work projects is to design shoes. With the large size tablet, I can imagine that I just put an insole on it or ask a person to step on it and then draw the outline. With the medium size tablet, I am concerned that the workflow may require more steps. I guess I need to draw the outline on a piece of paper. Then, use a photocopying machine to scale it down. Then, draw the scaled outline on the tablet. Finally, scale it back to normal size on the computer.
     
  11. campyguy, Jan 26, 2015
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2015

    campyguy macrumors 68030

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    #11
    You're overthinking your work process IMO, and I do get what you're hoping to accomplish. I've been building bridges and buildings for over 20 years, and can tell the difference between a 19mm bolt head and a 20mm bolt head from distance. Seriously.

    For what you're describing, I use the scanning engine in the latest version of Illustrator and an inexpensive scanner. Scan the image (be it a real object or a drawn sketch on graph paper), and use Adobe Illustrator's tracing engine to create a usable (and scaled) object to work with.

    Wacom's driver does provide a "full" or "1-to-1" mapping system that is completely independent of the OS, and using a Large or Medium or Small Wacom tablet is NOT going to change the scaling issue you're concerned about. Wacom tablets are not digitizers, but Wacom has purchased much of the IP of digitizing-related companies that have gone under over the years. And, FWIW, I helped design and build out 3 light rail alignments that are in operation today - with software drivers created by companies whose IP is owned by Wacom.

    I'm not a huge Wacom fan of late. I really liked the solid Japanese-made tablets made in the early 2000's far better than the creaky Chinese-made stuff for sale offered now. I've told them that (they're in Vancouver WA, and I'm across the River in Portland OR). And, they do make a large tablet I wouldn't want to be hit over the head with. Or, work on a daily basis... :D But, the large tablets are huge - see one for yourself and you'll see what I'm alluding to.
    Cheers!
     
  12. peterpan123 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #12

    I have tried the Special Edition (Medium). It is quite good. I have not tried the large version as stores usually do not have it on demo. From what you told me, even I go for the medium size, the scaling can be done easily. So, just go for the medium size. Am I correct?
     
  13. campyguy macrumors 68030

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    #13
    Pretty much. I have used a large tablet off and on for several years, going back to digitizers attached to PCs for CAD/CAM work in the early 90s - they eat up desk space and I always felt I was wasting arm motion and time. I can accomplish more with smaller, precise movements - like flicks of a wrist instead of a wave of my arm, for instance. And, with "mouse mode", one can get very precise with cursor location and movement.

    Also, FWIW, I use my tablet with my right hand and a trackpad with my left hand, sandwiched between a keyboard. I've used either a trackpad or mouse with a Wacom tablet for over a decade, and I draft or draw circles (pardon the pun...) around my counterparts - I get the benefit of two input devices, and larger tablet would likely preclude me from being as productive as I am. I always pack up my medium tablet when I'm hitting the road and use it, only breaking out my small tablet when I'm really limited on space.

    Good luck with your choice, I'm very happy with mine! :D
     
  14. peterpan123 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #14
    I only have Illustrator CS6. Can it do what you described?
     
  15. campyguy macrumors 68030

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    #15
    Yes, however, there's a yeabutt and YMMV attached. And, there's no "only" about AI6 - it's still a sweet piece of software!

    I've used AI6 but moved to the CC suite. The AI6 scanning engine is basically the same one IMO as the one found in Streamline 4, which I also owned at the time. Adobe overhauled the scanning engine in the latest two CC version, and it's so much faster and more accurate than the engine in AI6 it made my cry the first time I used it.

    But, yes, no problem - work from a really good scan or drawing and you're in like Flynn. I have an old Canon MP620 that I use for quick scans and it worked very nicely for AI6 and works as well for AI CC 2014.
     
  16. peterpan123 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #16
    What do you mean?
     
  17. campyguy macrumors 68030

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    #17
    Sorry, despite the lead-in I thought I was clear. My "yeah, but" and "your mileage may vary" is that I'm on the CC platform and you're on CS6.

    Building on what I wrote and you quoted - about the scanning engine (tracing) is far more powerful in CC 2014 than that in AI6 - faster, more options, better results. I've lived in AI and get lots of client sketches on napkins and notepads - being able to get them in vector form and be able to modify them in AI with my Intuos makes my life much easier, and the new tracing engine gets me out the door a couple of hours early some weeks. Watching some of my competitors fumble around with a mouse and older software in their offices, and getting shoddy results - I get my jollies sometimes from seeing that. That's all I was getting at. Cheers!
     

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