Want my son safe. Is this mold?

Is this mold?

  • Yes

    Votes: 10 83.3%
  • No

    Votes: 3 25.0%

  • Total voters
    12

npolly0212

macrumors 65816
Sep 21, 2015
1,279
334
Looks just like it. If you were to peel off more to the right, the spot you have showing looks like a wet patch in the wall and in the upper right corner of it you can we a different color almost like it is dry up there
 

Wolverine7123

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Apr 4, 2016
4
0
Looks just like it. If you were to peel off more to the right, the spot you have showing looks like a wet patch in the wall and in the upper right corner of it you can we a different color almost like it is dry up there
this is a zoomed out picture before I peeled it
[doublepost=1459822568][/doublepost]
this is a zoomed out picture before I peeled it
[doublepost=1459822662][/doublepost] IMG_20160404_180510.jpg
 

npolly0212

macrumors 65816
Sep 21, 2015
1,279
334
It looks like it could have gotten wet then started to peel

Working for a restoration company I would do no further with it right now in case it is actually mold so you don't stir anything up or irritate it. And call and talk to whoever you need to...landlord, insurance or whatnot
 

Wolverine7123

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Apr 4, 2016
4
0
It looks like it could have gotten wet then started to peel

Working for a restoration company I would do no further with it right now in case it is actually mold so you don't stir anything up or irritate it. And call and talk to whoever you need to...landlord, insurance or whatnot
Thank you, I put tape over it until tomorrow when I call landlord lol
 

fitshaced

macrumors 68000
Jul 2, 2011
1,728
3,026
This reminds me of a flight I was on some years ago when they were handing out small bags of peanuts. There was a kid next to me and his Dad the other side. He leaned over his son and he told me that his son was allergic to peanuts and so if I could please not give him any. Not saying that he or the OP should not be parents but for crying out loud, you don't have a toxic leak in your house! Your life revolves around your child, we get it. But you're a walking billboard for one of those annoying facebook posters such as 'you don't know what love is until you've had a child'.

Did I overreact? Yeah probably, makes two of us then.
 

Mr_Brightside_@

macrumors 68040
Sep 23, 2005
3,091
1,135
Toronto
This reminds me of a flight I was on some years ago when they were handing out small bags of peanuts. There was a kid next to me and his Dad the other side. He leaned over his son and he told me that his son was allergic to peanuts and so if I could please not give him any. Not saying that he or the OP should not be parents but for crying out loud, you don't have a toxic leak in your house! Your life revolves around your child, we get it. But you're a walking billboard for one of those annoying facebook posters such as 'you don't know what love is until you've had a child'.

Did I overreact? Yeah probably, makes two of us then.
Do you...not know what allergies are?

What if OP's son has a breathing problem?
 

Mr_Brightside_@

macrumors 68040
Sep 23, 2005
3,091
1,135
Toronto
Good parents teach their children not to take candy (or peanuts) from strangers. That's rule number one. My son knew by the time he was 5 that he had to question anything he ate due to allergies.
Ok, but do you understand how people can react to their allergies? They don't have to eat the peanut.
 
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AlliFlowers

Contributor
Jan 1, 2011
4,433
8,407
L.A. (Lower Alabama)
Ok, but do you understand how people can react to their allergies? They don't have to eat the peanut.
I do understand. If you touch a walnut and then touch my son, he risks anaphylaxis. I get it. You could also put the child by the window so that you can protect him from anyone who might touch him, give him something, or breathe on him. It is the job of the parent to take care of the child.
 

Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
45,381
30,656
The Far Horizon
This reminds me of a flight I was on some years ago when they were handing out small bags of peanuts. There was a kid next to me and his Dad the other side. He leaned over his son and he told me that his son was allergic to peanuts and so if I could please not give him any. Not saying that he or the OP should not be parents but for crying out loud, you don't have a toxic leak in your house! Your life revolves around your child, we get it. But you're a walking billboard for one of those annoying facebook posters such as 'you don't know what love is until you've had a child'.

Did I overreact? Yeah probably, makes two of us then.
Well, yes, I think it entirely possible that you did over-react in your post.

This is because violent allergic reactions to something such as peanuts can kill, and can kill very rapidly, and I would argue that the parent in the plane was behaving in a polite, proactive and intelligent manner.
 

0007776

Suspended
Jul 11, 2006
6,474
8,051
Somewhere
Well, yes, I think it entirely possible that you did over-react in your post.

This is because violent allergic reactions to something such as peanuts can kill, and can kill very rapidly, and I would argue that the parent in the plane was behaving in a polite, proactive and intelligent manner.
Exactly, the parent there was doing what he should have. I had a flight on southwest not too long ago where the flight attendants made an announcement that they wouldn't be serving peanuts as snacks on that flight because there was someone onboard with a severe allergy. Sure it was a little inconvenient if you wanted peanuts instead of the pretzels that were the other snack, but it was great that they would do it.

It doesn't seem like the OP was overreacting here either. Mold can be a bad thing, and to good for them to get it checked.
 
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rdowns

macrumors Penryn
Jul 11, 2003
27,345
12,408
This reminds me of a flight I was on some years ago when they were handing out small bags of peanuts. There was a kid next to me and his Dad the other side. He leaned over his son and he told me that his son was allergic to peanuts and so if I could please not give him any. Not saying that he or the OP should not be parents but for crying out loud, you don't have a toxic leak in your house! Your life revolves around your child, we get it. But you're a walking billboard for one of those annoying facebook posters such as 'you don't know what love is until you've had a child'.

Did I overreact? Yeah probably, makes two of us then.
Who pissed in your Cheerios that morning?
 

Wolverine7123

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Apr 4, 2016
4
0
There's a lot more other spots that look like mold throughout the apartment. Health inspectors are coming on the 14th so I'm asking what people think. You can start having health problems within 3 months of living under mold exposure.
 

Christoffee

macrumors 6502
Jul 26, 2012
351
465
UK
This reminds me of a flight I was on some years ago when they were handing out small bags of peanuts. There was a kid next to me and his Dad the other side. He leaned over his son and he told me that his son was allergic to peanuts and so if I could please not give him any. Not saying that he or the OP should not be parents but for crying out loud, you don't have a toxic leak in your house! Your life revolves around your child, we get it. But you're a walking billboard for one of those annoying facebook posters such as 'you don't know what love is until you've had a child'.

Did I overreact? Yeah probably, makes two of us then.
Peanut allergy serious!
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2724684/Nut-allergy-girl-went-anaphylactic-shock-plane-passenger-ignored-three-warnings-not-eat-nuts-board.html
 

npolly0212

macrumors 65816
Sep 21, 2015
1,279
334
There's a lot more other spots that look like mold throughout the apartment. Health inspectors are coming on the 14th so I'm asking what people think. You can start having health problems within 3 months of living under mold exposure.
Sorry to hear that. Are -you guys gonna remain living there, or are you getting out until they come?
 

fitshaced

macrumors 68000
Jul 2, 2011
1,728
3,026
Well, yes, I think it entirely possible that you did over-react in your post.

This is because violent allergic reactions to something such as peanuts can kill, and can kill very rapidly, and I would argue that the parent in the plane was behaving in a polite, proactive and intelligent manner.
I know about peanut allergy. A friend of mine has it. But why would I feed his child with peanuts? It was over parenting. And this child was about 6 or 7.
 

Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
45,381
30,656
The Far Horizon
I know about peanut allergy. A friend of mine has it. But why would I feed his child with peanuts? It was over parenting. And this child was about 6 or 7.
No, in this case, candidly, I don't think it was over-parenting.

Rather, I'd argue that it was an example of fair warning from a parent which came in the form of a reasonable request; from your own post, you stated that he had asked you not to offer the kid a peanut and explained why he had made this request, a explanation which is completely credible.

Some who are allergic to peanuts can be allergic even to a whiff, or the merest touch of the offending nuts. In this instance, my sense is that the father took reasonable precautions to ensure that this scenario wouldn't arise, because he had taken steps to ensure that it couldn't.
 
Last edited:

A.Goldberg

macrumors 68020
Jan 31, 2015
2,325
7,637
Boston
FYI children with allergies often present differently than they do in adults. These are IgE mediated reactions and can be very, very sensitive- from simple contact with the allergen to inhaling fumes of the allergen.

Kid's bodies are also may be weaker in handling anaphylaxis. They also don't handle situations in the best manner. Also keep in mind not only is impaired breathing a risk, but some people can have coronary artery spasms which can easily cause a heart attack.

Personally I don't think airlines should serve nuts on planes (granted I haven't seen this in years). It doesn't make sense to risk someone with an unkown allergy from having a reaction mid flight. Pretzels are better anyways.
 
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fitshaced

macrumors 68000
Jul 2, 2011
1,728
3,026
No, in this case, candidly, I don't think it was over-parenting.

Rather, I'd argue that it was an examine of fair warning from a parent which came in the form of a reasonable request; from your own post, you stated that he had asked you not to offer the kid a peanut and explained why he had made this request, a explanation which is completely credible.

Some who are allergic to peanuts can be allergic even to a whiff, or the merest touch of the offending nuts. In this instance, my sense is that the father took reasonable precautions to ensure that this scenario wouldn't arise, because he had taken steps to ensure that it couldn't.
I don't agree. If the child was allergic to the scent of peanuts then the father is taking a big risk of being on a flight likely to serve them. All it takes is education to his son who was clearly old enough to understand to stay away from peanuts. No need to make his sons condition my responsibility. Plus, I like peanuts and the only way his child was getting any from me would be by stealing. I actually was surprise he didn't get an announcement made to inform all passengers of his child's fragile condition. He was that type.
[doublepost=1459914540][/doublepost]
FYI children with allergies often present differently than they do in adults. These are IgE mediated reactions and can be very, very sensitive- from simple contact with the allergen to inhaling fumes of the allergen.

Kid's bodies are also may be weaker in handling anaphylaxis. They also don't handle situations in the best manner. Also keep in mind not only is impaired breathing a risk, but some people can have coronary artery spasms which can easily cause a heart attack.

Personally I don't think airlines should serve nuts on planes (granted I haven't seen this in years). It doesn't make sense to risk someone with an unkown allergy from having a reaction mid flight. Pretzels are better anyways.
I agree that they could not serve peanuts on flights. Maybe substitute them for raisins. I won't miss them if they do. Or maybe the parent could have sat beside me with his son next to him on the other side meaning he is taking sole responsibility. Some people just over do it though. I know someone who spent far too much time trying to find the exact temperature the room should be for their baby. Hardly raising a super soldier like that.
 
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Scepticalscribe

macrumors Sandy Bridge
Jul 29, 2008
45,381
30,656
The Far Horizon
I don't agree. If the child was allergic to the scent of peanuts then the father is taking a big risk of being on a flight likely to serve them. All it takes is education to his son who was clearly old enough to understand to stay away from peanuts. No need to make his sons condition my responsibility. Plus, I like peanuts and the only way his child was getting any from me would be by stealing. I actually was surprise he didn't get an announcement made to inform all passengers of his child's fragile condition. He was that type.
[doublepost=1459914540][/doublepost]
I agree that they could not serve peanuts on flights. Maybe substitute them for raisins. I won't miss them if they do. Or maybe the parent could have sat beside me with his son next to him on the other side meaning he is taking sole responsibility. Some people just over do it though. I know someone who spent far too much time trying to find the exact temperature the room should be for their baby. Hardly raising a super soldier like that.
Candidly, I cannot escape the conclusion that you may be overreacting, and I'm astounded that you keep referring to a minor incident on a flight that occurred some time ago.

From my reading of your original post, at no stage did the father make his son's condition your responsibility. He merely requested you not to give peanuts to the kid, and advanced a reasonable explanation for his request. To my mind, that is taking responsibility for his son's condition, rather than requesting you to do so.

Actually, he was proactively identifying possible problems in advance, and taking steps to ensure that they wouldn't become a problem.

While I agree that some parents may be overprotective these days, the instance you have written about does not strike me as having fallen into that category. Rather, I'd regard the father's conduct as a sensible expression of parental responsibility, rather than over-protectiveness.
 
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fitshaced

macrumors 68000
Jul 2, 2011
1,728
3,026
Candidly, I cannot escape the conclusion that you may be overreacting, and I'm astounded that you keep referring to a minor incident on a flight that occurred some time ago.

From my reading of your original post, at no stage did the father make his son's condition your responsibility. He merely requested you not to give peanuts to the kid, and advanced a reasonable explanation for his request. To my mind, that is taking responsibility for his son's condition, rather than requesting you to do so.

Actually, he was proactively identifying possible problems in advance, and taking steps to ensure that they wouldn't become a problem.

While I concur that some parents may be overprotective these days, the instance you have written about does not strike me as having fallen into that category. I'd regard the father's conduct as a sensible expression of parental responsibility, rather than over-protectiveness.
You disagree, got it!
 

mw360

macrumors 68000
Aug 15, 2010
1,538
1,265
I know about peanut allergy. A friend of mine has it. But why would I feed his child with peanuts? It was over parenting. And this child was about 6 or 7.
He was clearly making you aware of the allergy so that not only would you not offer a nut, but that you'd also perhaps be very careful with the wrapper, the crumbs, your greasy fingers etc. In fact he was probably hoping you wouldn't open them at all. Rather than offend you by cramping your peanut rights or suggesting you'd be careless or messy or touch his son, he asked you not to offer a nut, because offering a nut is the nicest possible way you could have caused a problem. It's pretty smart and respectful.