Want to buy a Mac Book Pro

hexonxonx

macrumors 601
Original poster
Jul 4, 2007
4,610
1
Denver Colorado
I am thinking of getting the entry level Mac Book Pro. Bigger screen size, 2GB Ram, 2.2GHZ processor more faster then the Mac Books, 120 GB drive

OR,

The middle of the road model with the 2.4GHZ processor, same ram as above, 160 GB drive

Other than the obvious differances, are there any real benefits to upgrading to the middle one above? I don't think the slight differances in the processor speeds is enough to really matter. Both appear to come with the same software installed.

I have been a long time Windows user, since the old 3.11 days (Windows for Workgroups) :D and I have never had a problem solving my own computer problems. Having only one time barely using a mac before, will this be basically just like learning (Windows) all over again? Programs such as Photoshop won't work on the mac?

So many questions....

I may go to the Apple store to purchase it or I may simply go to BestBuy, I have a shiney new BB credit card that wants to be my best friend. Can I still buy the AppleCare from Apple no matter where I buy the computer?

Thanks for all the answers...

Hoping to be a :apple: user soon other than my iPhone. They say it is an iworld don't they?
 

iBookG4user

macrumors 604
Jun 27, 2006
6,596
2
Seattle, WA
I'd say go with the lower end model, you won't see much of a speed increase with the higher end model and just get an external hard drive if you need more storage. And yes you can get AppleCare from Apple regardless of where you bought your MacBook Pro.
 

siurpeeman

macrumors 603
Dec 2, 2006
6,311
18
the OC
mac os x is very different from windows. even though i've always used a mac, moving over to mac os x from classic (os 9) still required a bit of time for adjustment. some things were all new, and other things were not the same or just not there. i imagine coming over from windows will be a similar experience, where you'll find yourself wanting to do something basic but not knowing how to do it in mac os x. it takes a bit of time to get used to, but it isn't anything challenging. congrats on the purchase, and you can bring any questions about mac os x here.
 

DoFoT9

macrumors P6
Jun 11, 2007
17,530
32
Singapore
definately go the lower end. a 0.2ghz bump-up..... comeon its not that much more power. u can put ur own 160gb harddrive in, or even a 200gb if u wish.. itl be cheaper than thru apple.

yea learning will be kinda easy, but kinda hard... kinda hard to forget old windoze traits and all that stuff.. osx is a breeze tho, so easy to learn
 

Sbrocket

macrumors 65816
Jun 3, 2007
1,251
0
/dev/null
First of all, unless you have some specific need addressed by the minimal $500 upgrades between the low-end and mid-end MBP models (or are rolling in extra cash) then go with the low-end model. You'll save money and never be able to tell the difference between the two simply because of something like 0.2GHz on a dual-core processor. Of course you can always BTO upgrade the hard drive if you would like more internal storage space and stick with the low-end model, or if you have some specific use for the mid-end model just get that one. You didn't list what you're going to be using it for or I would help you out more. Everything else (read: basic features) are the same between the low and middle models; both have the same size LCD displays, both are LED-backlit, both have a 8600M GT GPU, etc etc.

There will be a transition period as you learn your way around OSX, obviously, and there's no use telling yourself otherwise. It is a completely different operating system and some adjustments, for better or worse, will have to be made before you start to grow fully comfortable with it. Don't expect to be able to pick up your new Mac and instantly start poking around in the system's innards; it will take time to adjust. Hopefully not too long, and since you sound fairly experienced I bet you'll be able to pick up the ins-and-outs of OSX pretty quickly. Of course, there'll always be some stuff you don't know; I've been a Mac user for years now and am still learning cool little tricks that streamline usage every now and then. Don't be too worried about the transition; less knowledgeable people have made the switch.

Some of your Windows software, specifically that software with a license for a single operating system or software from companies that don't support OSX, isn't going to work immediately. I'm not sure specifically in the case of Adobe Creative Suite if the license covers multiple operating systems, maybe someone else is. If you have some software that you absolutely must use, you can try out installing Windows (XP or Vista) on a separate partition of your drive using Boot Camp. I do this for Windows-only CAD programs (UGS NX 5) that I need to use for college, and it works just fine. Otherwise, there are many quality OSX applications that are drop-in replacements for Windows-only software.

If you ever have questions, that's what we're here for. Just remember to use the forum search; its very, very likely someone has asked your exact question before and it has been answered.

(Hrm, that ended up a bit on the long end...)

Edit: Oh, and don't buy at Best Buy. Of course I can't speak for everyone but I've had nothing but good experiences with my local Apple Stores, and dealing directly with Apple has its advantages.
 

Am3822

macrumors 6502
Aug 16, 2006
424
0
Groningen, The Netherlands
similar questions

I find myself in the same situation -- I have to return my university machine (mbp15/2.33) and buy one of my own. The .2Ghz difference doesn't really bother me, but the main question is what difference is there between the 128M and 256M video memory options.

Given that leopard includes a lot of three-dimensional stuff (stacks etc), will 128M be enough to support it over time?
 

DoFoT9

macrumors P6
Jun 11, 2007
17,530
32
Singapore
I find myself in the same situation -- I have to return my university machine (mbp15/2.33) and buy one of my own. The .2Ghz difference doesn't really bother me, but the main question is what difference is there between the 128M and 256M video memory options.

Given that leopard includes a lot of three-dimensional stuff (stacks etc), will 128M be enough to support it over time?
your looking at about 10-15% extra power with the 256mb... its really not all that much, if you can fork it up its good. but if not it doesnt really matter
 

hexonxonx

macrumors 601
Original poster
Jul 4, 2007
4,610
1
Denver Colorado
Some of your Windows software, specifically that software with a license for a single operating system or software from companies that don't support OSX, isn't going to work immediately. I'm not sure specifically in the case of Adobe Creative Suite if the license covers multiple operating systems, maybe someone else is. If you have some software that you absolutely must use, you can try out installing Windows (XP or Vista) on a separate partition of your drive using Boot Camp. I do this for Windows-only CAD programs (UGS NX 5) that I need to use for college, and it works just fine. Otherwise, there are many quality OSX applications that are drop-in replacements for Windows-only software.
Excellent, I didn't think about the duel boot possibilities!

Got another question, OS upgrades cost just like Windows upgrades do? With Leopard coming soon (so I hear), should I just wait for that or not worry about it and buy now?

Oh and I do have a large external 350 GB WD drive. Everything I DL from the net goes there.

One other minor differance on features, the macs don't have a card reader, guess I gotta transfer stuff either from my external drive or by cd/dvd.
 

Erasmus

macrumors 68030
Jun 22, 2006
2,654
165
Hiding from Omnius in Australia
Got another question, OS upgrades cost just like Windows upgrades do? With Leopard coming soon (so I hear), should I just wait for that or not worry about it and buy now?
If you buy now, you will have to fork up cash for Leopard when it is released. Unlike Vista, you will not be required to spend $500+ to get all the features. Leopard costs something like US$129. And you will not get an "upgrade" CD, you will get a full featured and complete operating system that does not require activation codes or anything like that.

I think you will find that 3+ months of MBP usage is well worth $129.
 

hexonxonx

macrumors 601
Original poster
Jul 4, 2007
4,610
1
Denver Colorado
If you buy now, you will have to fork up cash for Leopard when it is released. Unlike Vista, you will not be required to spend $500+ to get all the features. Leopard costs something like US$129. And you will not get an "upgrade" CD, you will get a full featured and complete operating system that does not require activation codes or anything like that.

I think you will find that 3+ months of MBP usage is well worth $129.
Thanks to everyone for the excellent replies. That makes up my mind there.
 

skye12

macrumors 65816
Nov 11, 2006
1,212
2
Austin, Tx
I'm going to wait until Oct to pick up my MBP with Leopard. Possible
it will be upgraded to a slightly faster processor by then too.

Wait as long as you can, then 3 months more.
 

booksacool1

macrumors 6502
Oct 17, 2004
293
1
Australia
I'm going to wait until Oct to pick up my MBP with Leopard. Possible
it will be upgraded to a slightly faster processor by then too.

Wait as long as you can, then 3 months more.
October? Probably a bit too early considering the average MBP update time is around 1/2 year. Possibly sometime January or even feb.
 

hexonxonx

macrumors 601
Original poster
Jul 4, 2007
4,610
1
Denver Colorado
I got my MBP early Tuesday morning. I am extremely happy with it and glad that I didn't wait. I can get the upgraded OS whenever it gets released. No big deal.
 

Sbrocket

macrumors 65816
Jun 3, 2007
1,251
0
/dev/null
I'm going to wait until Oct to pick up my MBP with Leopard. Possible
it will be upgraded to a slightly faster processor by then too.

Wait as long as you can, then 3 months more.
Ok, I'm sick and tired of seeing this. The MacBook Pro is not getting a faster processor in October because a faster mobile Intel processor does not currently exist in the market. That's it. The T7700 chip (Intel 2.4GHz Core 2 Duo, Codename Merom) is the fastest there is in the mobile range from Intel right now and that's what Apple is using; there's no where to upgrade to! The next update won't be until after Penryn's release sometime at the very end of this year (not October), and I seriously doubt that we'll see a MBP update as soon as Penryn becomes available to manufacturers.
 

Erasmus

macrumors 68030
Jun 22, 2006
2,654
165
Hiding from Omnius in Australia
Ok, I'm sick and tired of seeing this. The MacBook Pro is not getting a faster processor in October because a faster mobile Intel processor does not currently exist in the market. That's it. The T7700 chip (Intel 2.4GHz Core 2 Duo, Codename Merom) is the fastest there is in the mobile range from Intel right now and that's what Apple is using; there's no where to upgrade to! The next update won't be until after Penryn's release sometime at the very end of this year (not October), and I seriously doubt that we'll see a MBP update as soon as Penryn becomes available to manufacturers.
Perhaps people are referring to the 2.6 GHz extreme edition Merom?
If so, forget it. I'm sure you'll find that it draws more power than the normal 2.4, and therefore, Apple won't use it.

No MBP updates until next year.
 

AaronM58

macrumors member
May 22, 2007
58
0
Lubbock, TX
I may go to the Apple store to purchase it or I may simply go to BestBuy, I have a shiney new BB credit card that wants to be my best friend. Can I still buy the AppleCare from Apple no matter where I buy the computer?

For the love of God...please DO NOT buy from Best Buy. You will end of regretting it at some point. You've gotta trust me on this. And cut up that credit card while you're at it......"Remember Kids, Just Say NO To Best Buy"