iOS Want to Develop an iOS App...What Resources Should I Refer to?

decisions

macrumors member
Original poster
Sep 30, 2019
64
85
So I have an app idea that I'm passionate about. I have coding experience, mainly in Java, C++, and Javascript. I have little to no experience with Xcode or Swift.

So I've been trying to get into it, and am just wondering if I am looking in the right places to learn how to develop for iOS as fast as possible.

So far, I have been using CodeWithChris' YT tutorials. These feel beneficial and have helped me make progress with storyboarding, and are really accessible. However, his videos are made for people who have no coding experience, and so I am wondering if I would be better off using a more rigorous educational resource. Also, can someone clarify for me is learning to storyboard is a waste of my time if I know how to code? If storyboarding and code both have their benefits, then I am fine with learning both. However, if code is the eventual goal for every iOS developer, then I would rather begin by learning how to do everything I can in Swift, even if it might be a more difficult start.

Secondly, the other resource I have been reading is Apple's Swift 5.1 book they offer on iBooks. It seems pretty good, but I am wondering if I should just use this as a reference for things that I need, just read certain parts of it, or it's really worth the effort to read the whole thing.

Lastly, Apple has this Swift tutorial here:


Is this worth my time?

Thanks. Any insight is appreciated.
 

casperes1996

macrumors 601
Jan 26, 2014
4,382
2,231
Horsens, Denmark
I honestly think Apple's own resources are the best to go through. They move a bit faster typically cause they expect a bit of pre-existing knowledge (of course not if you start with Swift Playground's Learn to Code, but most of their stuff).

If by storyboarding you refer to the use of the .storyboard files, yes, you should probably still do that. Unless you want to use SwiftUI, in which case things are done differently, and you just write your UI. Apple's tutorial through SwiftUI is honestly the best framework guide I've ever read. It has demo projects, dynamic images as you scroll, and well written text.
If you've ever written an Android app, the .storyboard method isn't that different to the layout.xml files Android uses.
 

BootLoxes

macrumors 6502
Apr 15, 2019
276
179
I honestly think Apple's own resources are the best to go through. They move a bit faster typically cause they expect a bit of pre-existing knowledge (of course not if you start with Swift Playground's Learn to Code, but most of their stuff).

If by storyboarding you refer to the use of the .storyboard files, yes, you should probably still do that. Unless you want to use SwiftUI, in which case things are done differently, and you just write your UI. Apple's tutorial through SwiftUI is honestly the best framework guide I've ever read. It has demo projects, dynamic images as you scroll, and well written text.
If you've ever written an Android app, the .storyboard method isn't that different to the layout.xml files Android uses.
Where can I find this swiftui guide?
 

sundialsoft

macrumors newbie
Sep 2, 2010
28
1
Scotland
Apple's developer videos do help a bit. They have example code too.
I use stack overflow for questions, GitHub for examples.
Recently I have used 'hacking with swift' for some learning.
Yes to Storyboards. Laying out screens for all these different sized screens is a pain so keep layout very simple.
I don't suggest using SwiftUI for anything major as it's not fully formed yet. Worth knowing about.
Swift is a fast moving language so be aware of looking at any code before Swift 4.
If you know C++ then swift will be easy for you.
You do need a Mac, Xcode and a fairly up to date iPhone and iPad. No if's or buts.
 

MisterSavage

macrumors 68000
Nov 10, 2018
1,943
1,707
I haven't played with SwiftUI yet but fwiw I found some scenarios where I preferred using storyboard and others where I preferred doing everything via code. I didn't regret learning both.