Want to learn to develop an app

Discussion in 'iOS Programming' started by jef82, Aug 25, 2015.

  1. jef82 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2011
    #1
  2. 1458279 Suspended

    1458279

    Joined:
    May 1, 2010
    Location:
    California
    #2
    Ray runs an excellent site. I'm not sure if it's the best place to start. It depends on if you have any programming background or not.

    Give it a try and if you're lost, try some entry level programming books. Lynda.com and others have excellent learning tools.
     
  3. jef82 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2011
    #3
    Thanks for the tip. I have a little background, mainly on Java.
     
  4. page404 macrumors regular

    page404

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2013
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    #4
    There was a discount for Udemy recently on the MR frontpage. If you google for udemy coupons you might find another interesting one ( in the range 10-20$ instead of 200+$) . I follow a large part of the iOS9 course and it was very helpful and intuitive. Wenderlich is also good, but if you miss some background on the XCode IDE or programming, you might get lost sooner or later.
     
  5. metllicamilitia macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2015
    #5
    So for someone such as myself, I took programming in school, two different schools, two different education standards. The first school taught Visual Basic, the second school was stuck on QBasic. I have minimal intro level knowledge of both languages. I want to make iOS apps. However that requires Objective C knowledge. I understand Swift makes that easier, what hasn't been so easy is to find anywhere that will offer "intro" courses that assume you already have knowledge of Objective C or Java. So what would be the best route to go with zero knowledge or Objective C or Java?
     
  6. 1458279 Suspended

    1458279

    Joined:
    May 1, 2010
    Location:
    California
    #6
    Part if this is what your long term goals are. If you want a job vs want to make apps. In addition, game programming is different than business apps, etc...

    Having a background in programming, you can jump right into what Ray offers or a language specific book. Big Nerd Ranch offers ObjC and iOS books that are great.

    If you are looking at game dev, Unity is a popular path and might be a way to go depending on if you want a job or just to make apps.

    In the end, programming is programming. Once you learn one language, learning another isn't such a big deal, it's mainly syntax.

    The job market for Swift is still up in the air, we won't have a clear picture for a while, so knowing both is a good option.

    Understand that there is MUCH more to app dev than just the language. The APIs and many other things are needed.
     

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