Ways to make Apple Watch go to sleep.

Discussion in 'Apple Watch' started by iCore24, Apr 3, 2015.

  1. iCore24, Apr 3, 2015
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2015

    iCore24 macrumors 6502

    iCore24

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    #1
    In Apples Keynote I seen Kevin Lynch put his watch to sleep by covering the watch face with his hand. But can we turn it off by turning out wrist back down?
     
  2. profmatt macrumors 65816

    profmatt

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    #2
    The watch goes to sleep on its own after a few seconds of inactivity.
     
  3. iCore24 thread starter macrumors 6502

    iCore24

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    #3
    Well that sound like a horrible way to do it.
     
  4. Cory Bauer macrumors 6502a

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    #4
    Why?
     
  5. fousfous macrumors regular

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    #5
    It will turn of when we put the wrist down too.
     
  6. iCore24 thread starter macrumors 6502

    iCore24

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    #6
    I don't want my screen to be on when I'm walking.
     
  7. hemolyzer macrumors member

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    ONTARIO CANADA
    #7
    I'm pretty sure Apple answered your question seven months ago.
     
  8. Cory Bauer macrumors 6502a

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    #8
    It won't be. Like Fousfous said, the screen turns off when you lower your wrist. No need for a button to wake and sleep the screen.
     
  9. Armen macrumors 604

    Armen

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    #9
    maybe he walks like a wildman and swings his arms wildly :p
     
  10. Cory Bauer macrumors 6502a

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    #10
    Lol! I do wonder, is the watch going to be smart enough to tell the difference between raising your arm to view it and raising your arm to shovel food in your mouth, brush your teeth, or rest your face in hand?

    [​IMG]
     
  11. iCore24 thread starter macrumors 6502

    iCore24

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    #11
    I also wonder this? Im sure it will be smart enough to know.
     
  12. Watabou macrumors 68040

    Watabou

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    #12
    You eat with your watch hand? :confused:

    I think it will still power off when inactive. When toucharcade (macrumors' sister site) did a hands on, the watch kept turning off after around 20 seconds even when the demo person had her arm up
     
  13. Sharkey311 Suspended

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    Jan 11, 2013
    #13
    yes if you watch the guided tour videos just released, it says that it turns off by turning the wrist back down.
     
  14. Cory Bauer macrumors 6502a

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    #14
    Some foods are a two-handed affair #
     
  15. Watabou macrumors 68040

    Watabou

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    #15
    :D

    Touché.

    I think it would be cool if the Watch turns out to be really smart in this aspect.

    For instance, are they only using the accelerometer to detect raising the arm? If so, maybe they can detect the arc used or something.
     
  16. Armen macrumors 604

    Armen

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    #16
    I wonder if there are conditions in the accelerometer that have to be met first in order for the face to light up. For example:

    - wrist rotation = On
    - Arm raised, no wrist rotation = Off
    - Arm raised, wrist rotation = On
     
  17. zacheryjensen macrumors 6502a

    zacheryjensen

    Joined:
    May 11, 2009
    #17
    Anal retentive? So what if it turns on? It's just going to show a watch face and go off after a couple seconds. This is actually kind of extra funny, because, I was just recently looking at a thread where someone was moaning that it wasn't on all the time.

    I personally am not going to fret about it popping on spontaneously once in a while.

    ----------

    Motion detection isn't achieved in this trivial of a manner, it's typically achieved through repetitively taught neural network based heuristic detection. It sounds more complex than it is for a programmer. Basically, a device would be attached to a wrist and record motions on camera for a long time, again and again, and eventually related detectible events with desired actions, reduce the complexity (like smoothing a 3D model) and voila, a state machine for responding to natural common actions with physical movement.

    It's tedious but the result is much more nuanced that what you're suggesting. Plus, it almost certainly involves more than just the motion sensors. It's likely considering the IR sensor (light level sensor) as well. I think the reason the watch turned off when Kevin Lynch covered it is because it was trained to react that way to a cuff or sleeve sliding over the watch, not because they wanted people to actually intentionally perform that gesture.

    At any rate, my whole point is, we're going to have to wait and try it out and see how it reacts with all of our individual nuances, sort of like when Siri came out and people were impressed... people who spoke English clearly without an accent anyway :)
     

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