Web-based emulators

Discussion in 'Apple Collectors' started by DisMyMac, Apr 6, 2013.

  1. DisMyMac macrumors 65816

    DisMyMac

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2009
    #1
    Think they will ever port System 7 to Javascript? I would sure like to play on a web-based "Performa" circa 1995, preferably with cheats and rapid restarts.

    I'd also love to see old platforms pushed to their limits using modern coding methods.... What would an Atari 2600 or an 8-bit NES game look like today? Surely new optimizations could make some amazing games for old systems. They eked 14 years out of Neo Geo, not even counting the system's pre-consumer days!
     
  2. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Location:
    Inside
    #2
    Well if full Windows XP can be made to run in JavaScript, System 7 shouldn't be all that much more difficult.
     
  3. DisMyMac thread starter macrumors 65816

    DisMyMac

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2009
    #3
    Heh... sad but true- my workplace just "updated" XP to service pack 3 released in 2008 (never mind what I do :eek:).
     
  4. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2010
    Location:
    Inside
    #4
    You poor soul. XP service pack 2 hasn't had any updates in years. That was an extremely bad choice on their part. I hate to think what they'll do when XP is killed next April.
     
  5. Giuly macrumors 68040

    Giuly

    #5
    Like that, I suppose:
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  6. DisMyMac thread starter macrumors 65816

    DisMyMac

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2009
    #6
    Wow, that's exactly what I was getting at! I'll bet they used vastly superior software for making the game... The idea is to leverage today's programming against yesterday's limits. (This could be a model for intelligent design, if you believe in that.)
     
  7. Anonymous Freak macrumors 601

    Anonymous Freak

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2002
    Location:
    Cascadia
    #7
    So "port to Javascript" isn't going to happen - "port" implies modifying the source code to work on a new platform. Apple isn't going to do that.

    An "emulator" however, is very possible. Although a "simulator" is not only easier, but has already happened: WebSE.

    And a full emulator for Amiga is in process: SAE.


    There are three main ways to "emulate" the Mac OS:

    The first is a simple simulator. A simulator is just that - it simulates (pretends) to be the real thing, but isn't at all. That is what WebSE is. It's a site that behaves like a Macintosh, but doesn't have any actual Apple code running, and doesn't run any actual Macintosh software - it is merely a mockup made to look like a Mac.

    The second would be a "software emulator". This is a full re-write of the Mac OS to run on other hardware/OSes. It contains no Apple code, but it looks like the Mac OS, and can run Mac OS software. Executor is a prominent example of this for the classic Mac OS. These have the benefit of being 100% legal, with no copyright or license restrictions from Apple. They are also *VERY* intensive to make - as you have to PERFECTLY emulate the OS itself. (Executor runs a very limited selection of Mac OS applications.)

    The third is a "hardware emulator". Rather than emulating the Mac OS itself, it would emulate the Macintosh hardware. There are lots of these available, the most notable being Basilisk II and SheepShaver (for 68k and PPC, respectively.) At their core, they emulate a specific set of hardware, which then can run any OS that hardware could run. The downside (for Macintosh enthusiasts) is that they require an Apple ROM (chip via physical card, or ripped ROM image,) to be run the Mac OS. And that is of questionable legality in many cases. This would be the most "complete" way to do it, but also the most intensive - you're emulating raw hardware, so you can't take advantage of programming shortcuts for specific OS actions.
     

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