What allows libraries to carry and lend out materials.....

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by SamIchi, Nov 29, 2007.

  1. SamIchi macrumors 68030

    SamIchi

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    #1
    Do they have a license of some sort?

    I know people donate books to the library and then they go and lend the material out to others, can anyone start a library?
     
  2. abijnk macrumors 68040

    abijnk

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    Oct 15, 2007
    Location:
    Los Angeles, CA
    #2
    Aren't public libraries funded with tax dollars? At least in the US... Of course major libraries get private donations too...
     
  3. Stampyhead macrumors 68020

    Stampyhead

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    Sep 3, 2004
    Location:
    London, UK
    #3
    I believe public libraries are part of the county government. I don't think there is anything stopping you from amassing a ton of books and lending them out to people, you just wouldn't be able to call yourself a county library.
     
  4. Super Macho Man macrumors 6502a

    Super Macho Man

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    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    Hollywood, CA
    #4
    Why would they need a license? Anybody can buy a book and lend it to anyone else as long as they don't keep a copy for themselves. Libraries don't violate copyright law. Public/private doesn't matter.
     
  5. Macky-Mac macrumors 68030

    Macky-Mac

    Joined:
    May 18, 2004
    #5
    you can start the "SamIchi Library" if you want

    depending on where you are and what the local laws are, you might have to get a standard business license, but that wouldn't be a "library" license
     
  6. arkitect macrumors 601

    arkitect

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    Location:
    Bath, United Kingdom
    #6
    Public Lending Right also applies.

    This allows authors to receive payment for the loans of their books by public libraries.

    This of course does not apply to publications in the public domain…
     
  7. SamIchi thread starter macrumors 68030

    SamIchi

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    #7
    The reason why I made this thread was because of file sharing on the internet. Since my favorite site Oink got shutdown, I was trying to think why it got shut down. If I was to compare Oink to a public library, what is the difference besides the digital factor. Everyone on there somehow acquired an album and decided to share it through a tracker, and the oink site was the library. Yea there was no time limit on how long you could have the files, but with a library, you could basically keep renewing a book, or dvd, or whatever else they offer there. What do you think?

    If I was to open a public library, that only held audio, the material original (cd's vinyl, etc.), like books and lent them out to people, whats the difference between that and what Oink did? Granted they also had a lot of software, but if it was strictly audio, what is the difference?
     
  8. arkitect macrumors 601

    arkitect

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    Sep 5, 2005
    Location:
    Bath, United Kingdom
    #8
    ^^^^

    As a Public Lending Library you have to pay fees and royalties.

    That is the difference between lending libraries and software/audio piracy sites such as Oink… ;)
     
  9. atszyman macrumors 68020

    atszyman

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    Sep 16, 2003
    Location:
    The Dallas 'burbs
    #9
    The big difference is that at the public library they have a finite number of physical media for each audio recording lent. At some point the Library will run out of the media and that recording would be available to no-one else. Someone could still keep a copy forever, but they'd be depriving someone else of that recording. With digital data there is always another copy available if someone else wants it, and no one has to return theirs so that someone else can enjoy it.
     
  10. SamIchi thread starter macrumors 68030

    SamIchi

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    #10
    What if i opened up a library and paid those fees?

    Shouldn't that be a good thing? With our technology we should be able to acquire information faster and more readily.
     
  11. arkitect macrumors 601

    arkitect

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    Bath, United Kingdom
    #11
    Absolutely no problem then. If you can supply the infrastructure and cash. :)
     
  12. CalBoy macrumors 604

    CalBoy

    Joined:
    May 21, 2007
    #12
    Wasn't Oink a download site (I never went there myself, so I'm not positive:eek:)? Couldn't you download songs and keep them forever? You can't do that with a library, as you must return the books/materials at some point (or pay the fine for them).
    Then you'd be fine. However, record companies are hesitant to do this, so good luck:p

    Actually, not all of that is true. Those "download as many songs as you want for $15/month" sites are legal, but you have to maintain the subscription. Once you stop paying, the songs disappear. I guess that's similar to a library.

    You'll find that most libraries are putting content into digital form as well as keeping the physical form. However, I hardly think that music is "information";)
     
  13. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #13
    You'll also see that some of the book companies also give away a chunk of their library on CD with the purchase of a book, I know BAEN has some several CD versions with around 100 of their old books on it.

    Also some publisher sites carry some of their old books available as free downloads to read. The Baen Free Library is a decent example.

    Not really too bad a way to pick up some old books, or get people interested in their author's works.
     
  14. eMac4ever macrumors regular

    eMac4ever

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2005
    #14
    I am not sure that the U.S. has this. http://www.kaapeli.fi/~fla/flj/wigell.htm
     
  15. atszyman macrumors 68020

    atszyman

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2003
    Location:
    The Dallas 'burbs
    #15
    Not necessarily. Producers of the content need to get some sort of compensation. If anyone can go to the Library and download a book for free and keep it forever, who will pay the authors. As it now stands the Library only has a finite number of a book and when they are all gone they either need to purchase more (payment for the book creator) or wait for some to be returned and people who want to read the book can wait or purchase their own copy.

    If we allow unrestricted digital lending of books and/or music I'd expect authors and musicians to become very scarce as their only source of revenue would be selling a single copy to every "library." Soon we'd end up with very little new content for the "libraries."

    I don't debate that with the current technology things should be easier and faster to obtain, but that doesn't mean that they should be free.
     

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