What am I good at?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by georgi0, Nov 28, 2010.

  1. georgi0 macrumors regular

    georgi0

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    #1
    Ok after 20 years or so in the same line of business I realized that I made a mistake and I want to change what I do as I am so depressed and not excited at all by what I do.

    I have a daily burden in my stomach each and everyday when I go to work...


    Where can i take a survey and see where am I really good at? Are there any sites that help you decide where you are really good at?


    :confused:
     
  2. 184550 Guest

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    May 8, 2008
    #2
    Why depend on some program to identify your interests?

    What are you interested in? What was your favorite subject in school? What are your hobbies?
     
  3. georgi0 thread starter macrumors regular

    georgi0

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    #3
    i thought there was a series of questions that could help you derive some conclusions...

    I really love computers, new programs/software testing, hardware and especially apple software and hardware.
    i have a business / food background which I do not appreciate at all (the food part)
    I like logic and i don't like literature and theory at all...

    would this help?
     
  4. KeriJane, Nov 28, 2010
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2010

    KeriJane macrumors 6502a

    KeriJane

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    #4
    Welcome to "Having a Career"! :eek:

    Whatever you do, don't quit. Keep at it until you figure yourself out and find a reasonable alternative.

    Why not stop by your local community college? They may be able to help you find what interests you.

    The problem with chasing dreams is the risk of becoming a starving artist, like my brother. He gave up a good career in medicine to become a musician. Why?
    He didn't like his job. Years later, he lives in public housing. (across the country)
    Why? because like most things that people "want" to do for a living it usually doesn't pay very well or pays nothing at all 98% of the time.
    That top 2% makes all of the money. Just look at American Idol.

    Other things that people "like" to do are often the same as the Musician business. The top does great and the vast majority including a lot of very talented people, do poorly.

    My advice: If you truly can't stand your career, try to find a well-paying one that is more tolerable while you work on "Plan B".
    In other words: You may well end up with something as bad or worse if you want to make decent money.

    You should already know your strengths and weaknesses after 20 years on the job. Write them down on a piece of paper. Then try to figure out if you want to add new skills or work with what you've already got. Perhaps it will be more clear on paper.

    Good Luck,
    Keri


    PS. I've been at my truly awful job for 23+ years. Now I'm just counting down time remaining and smile at the sadistic fiends that pass for management nowadays. I've outlasted many, many management teams and might just outlast these ones too.

    PPS. The grass really IS greener on the other side! Why? Because it's VERY WELL FERTILIZED!
     
  5. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    #5
    Go to an industrial physiologist, and take their tests.

    I did 2 days of this, when I changed careers at 30.
     
  6. georgi0, Nov 29, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 29, 2010

    georgi0 thread starter macrumors regular

    georgi0

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    #6
    @ KeriJane

    Thank you. What you wrote me, goes without saying. I realized all these things (a little bit late ..) now I am 40. This is why I need to change things, cut on expenses, find a job to feel a little better and hopefully not pass my "misery" to my wife...

    tnx, could you shed some more light? I never heard this term before and what kind of questions did he asked...

    Are you satisfied from the choice you made in your 30's?
     
  7. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

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    #7
    Based on your interests it sounds like maybe software development may interest you.

    Its something that you could start off learning on your own at first too to see if you are interested in it. You could still work your normal job for the $$$ and learn programming on the side. It deals with computers and LOTS of logic so it may be worth a shot.

    If you've never programmed before and are interested you could start by learning Java, C, C++, (but not Objective-C yet! That would confuse the hell out of a beginner). If you find out its something that interests you you could continue to plug away at it.

    EDIT: If you really like Apple stuff like stated, a good learning path would be C -> Objective-C -> Cocoa and you could write iPhone apps or Apple apps. A lot of people frown upon starting in the C languages and usually recommend Java for someone beginning but C will be more useful if you want to learn Objective-C and Cocoa. Mac is centered around the Objective-C language and the Cocoa frameworks. (I started with X86 Assembler, moved to C, Visual Basic, then C++, then Objective -C. DONT take my path!)
     
  8. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    #8
    That was some time (40 years) ago, so I don't remember much.

    There were all designed to highlight how my mind worked (relative to the task at hand), my areas of strength and weakness, my likes and dislikes, and to determine my level of personal development.

    I was asked by my employer at the time, to switch from insurance claims work to be a user analyst, in the conversion from unit-record to an IBM 360.

    The problem they had with me is that I did not finish high school, although I had worked my way up from the ground in the adjusting field.

    And yes, I was quite pleased. The old job was fast approaching repetition. ;)
     
  9. steve2112 macrumors 68040

    steve2112

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    #9
    If you are in the U.S., you can often go to a community college and they will have some type of workforce development program that often will offer those career aptitude tests that can determine what you are good at doing.

    Step 2: Read the book 48 Days to the Work You Love.
     
  10. Peterkro, Nov 29, 2010
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2010

    Peterkro macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

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    #10
    Read the book "what colour is your parachute" I just met someone who spent a life time doing a dreary corporate job who after reading the book threw it all in and she now has a successful career making custom golf clubs.
     
  11. steve2112 macrumors 68040

    steve2112

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    #11
    Oh yeah, I forgot about that book. It's very good.
     
  12. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    #12
    You're unhappy with where you are in your career and you want to find out what you're good at? Why not find out what you like instead? :confused:
     
  13. georgi0, Nov 30, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 30, 2010

    georgi0 thread starter macrumors regular

    georgi0

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    #13
    I am not satisfied with the business I am in to. I am seeking advice / ideas as what to do in order to change this and maybe seek another career now before it's too late for me.

    thank you both, I will check the books out and try to read them ASAP.

    sounds very interesting. i have to check if I am capable of learning at this point of my life a programming language... A book or some other tool is better?
     
  14. angelwatt Moderator emeritus

    angelwatt

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    #14
  15. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    #15
    I think that's great - but go with something you're going to like, instead of just because you think you'll be good at it. It's easy to learn to do a job; it's harder to learn to like it.
     
  16. chrono1081 macrumors 604

    chrono1081

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    #16
    A book is usually the best way to start. Just one thing to understand if you delve into the world of programming:

    1. Its never to late to learn. Programmers constantly learn new stuff all the time.

    2. Its hard. You will get stuck in places, you will get frustrated. This is completely normal and you will overcome your stuck phases.

    3. There is no "best" language. Pick one language and learn it well before switching to another language. All languages use the same underlying concepts, just the syntax changes for the most part. Once you learn one language well its easy to switch around.

    I would say if you are interested in learning the easiest way to start making working stuff is to learn Python. Python is generally the standard recommendation for beginner programers. Java is another one that is popular.

    If you think you may want to develop for the iPhone perhaps as an indie developer or something then you would want to start by learning C. (No C++ or Objective-C as a first language)

    There are a ton of different books out there. Unfortunately the C books I used to use are long since antiquated so I'm not sure what to recommend but there are plenty of Amazon reviews.

    The most important thing though as mentioned above is pick a language and stick with it. You will end up with multiple books on one language usually and once you learn one well, you can hop to others.
     
  17. Angel baby macrumors member

    Angel baby

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    #17
    Perhaps, you need a holiday to have a relax. Many people feel the same way when then in the same line of business for a long time. You can rightly call it depression or burnout. Its more like feeling gray and dull all the time. You should find ways to mitigate the pressure, adjust psychology and to fix position exactly.

    Hope you feel better!:)
     
  18. 63dot macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #18
    If you spent 20 years in your same line of work, it's probably obvious you have not always hated it or been burned out.

    Doesn't it seem natural for most people to want to change careers a few times in their life? Not only is this the trend, but it's probably healthier.
     
  19. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

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    #19
    I couldn't agree with this more. I think you're experiencing what many do, burnout.
     
  20. georgi0 thread starter macrumors regular

    georgi0

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    #20
    Aha ! looking back all those answers.

    I am still struggling in the same business. I can surely count the very few days I got some joy out of it.

    Did not have the nerve to change anything significant. Struggling every day and hoping for the best.

    It's true what they say if you don't love your work dont expect much out of it.
    I feel like my ship is taking me wherever the sea wants to, and not the other way around.

    I'll come back in a few years and read it all again.

    I tried to study a language from scratch but could not keep up in terms of many holes in my learning progress and not enough time.

    Hope all of you guys are doing fine.
    :)
     
  21. Koodauw macrumors 68040

    Koodauw

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    #21
    You may want to check out this book:

    Strength Finder 2.0

    It gives you an code to go online and find out some strengths. You could probably bypass the book and just go to the website as well.

    I did it and found the results interesting.

    best of luck to you.
     
  22. Gutwrench macrumors 65816

    Gutwrench

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    #22
    I retired from one profession and have been a "software engineer" (really just a title for programmer/analyst) for ten years. Before retiring I was constantly continuing my education because no field I'm capable of working in is safe. Making the jump to development was no easy task and yet I suspect it was easier ten years ago when I made it than today.

    Since you're 40 YOA, is there some parallel field where your present education and experience can take you that would provide a decent living and satisfaction? Otherwise you might consider seeking out the help of a local community college to see what technical fields they offer as that's usually a reflection of the needs of your community. You can attend part time or if you have the means quit your present job and go full time. Good luck to you.
     

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