What are the 5 high level programming languages

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by Eric Lewis, Oct 5, 2007.

  1. Eric Lewis macrumors 68020

    Eric Lewis

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    #1
    Thanks its for computer engineering..i have no idea?
     
  2. SilentPanda Moderator emeritus

    SilentPanda

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    #2
    That seems like a rather vague homework question that might be better answered by your textbook instead of the community. Often times the questions are pulled directly from information in your book. I don't know that there is a concrete answer to this question otherwise.

    For instance one web site I found lists this:

    That list doesn't even sound like it's all inclusive. That and other references say C is a low level language whereas here it's listed as a high level one.
     
  3. Eric Lewis thread starter macrumors 68020

    Eric Lewis

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    CANADA? eh?
    #3
    ok

    why is high level langauge better then low level?
     
  4. SC68Cal macrumors 68000

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  5. SilentPanda Moderator emeritus

    SilentPanda

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    #5
    Low level languages only use the bottom half of the keyboard whereas high level languages use both the top and bottom halves. Being able to use the full character set allows for easier to read code.
     
  6. kainjow Moderator emeritus

    kainjow

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    #6
    Now I know why I always felt like I've been missing something all these years. I could never put it into words. Thanks!!!!11!!
     
  7. Stampyhead macrumors 68020

    Stampyhead

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    #7
    That sounds like Mr. Garrison teaching computer class...
     
  8. MongoTheGeek macrumors 68040

    MongoTheGeek

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    #8
    From the debian fortune file...

    THE LESSER-KNOWN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES #10: SIMPLE

    SIMPLE is an acronym for Sheer Idiot's Monopurpose Programming Language
    Environment. This language, developed at the Hanover College for
    Technological Misfits, was designed to make it impossible to write code
    with errors in it. The statements are, therefore, confined to BEGIN,
    END and STOP. No matter how you arrange the statements, you can't make
    a syntax error. Programs written in SIMPLE do nothing useful. Thus
    they achieve the results of programs written in other languages without
    the tedious, frustrating process of testing and debugging.
    %
    THE LESSER-KNOWN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES #12: LITHP

    This otherwise unremarkable language is distinguished by the absence of
    an "S" in its character set; users must substitute "TH". LITHP is said
    to be useful in protheththing lithtth.
    %
    THE LESSER-KNOWN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES #13: SLOBOL

    SLOBOL is best known for the speed, or lack of it, of its compiler.
    Although many compilers allow you to take a coffee break while they
    compile, SLOBOL compilers allow you to travel to Bolivia to pick the
    coffee. Forty-three programmers are known to have died of boredom
    sitting at their terminals while waiting for a SLOBOL program to
    compile. Weary SLOBOL programmers often turn to a related (but
    infinitely faster) language, COCAINE.
    %
    THE LESSER-KNOWN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES #14 -- VALGOL

    VALGOL is enjoying a dramatic surge of popularity across the
    industry. VALGOL commands include REALLY, LIKE, WELL, and Y*KNOW.
    Variables are assigned with the =LIKE and =TOTALLY operators. Other
    operators include the "California booleans", AX and NOWAY. Loops are
    accomplished with the FOR SURE construct. A simple example:

    LIKE, Y*KNOW(I MEAN)START
    IF PIZZA =LIKE BITCHEN AND
    GUY =LIKE TUBULAR AND
    VALLEY GIRL =LIKE GRODY**MAX(FERSURE)**2
    THEN
    FOR I =LIKE 1 TO OH*MAYBE 100
    DO*WAH - (DITTY**2); BARF(I)=TOTALLY GROSS(OUT)
    SURE
    LIKE, BAG THIS PROGRAM; REALLY; LIKE TOTALLY(Y*KNOW); IM*SURE
    GOTO THE MALL

    VALGOL is also characterized by its unfriendly error messages. For
    example, when the user makes a syntax error, the interpreter displays the
    message GAG ME WITH A SPOON! A successful compile may be termed MAXIMALLY
    AWESOME!
    %
    THE LESSER-KNOWN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES #15 -- DOGO

    Developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Obedience Training, DOGO
    DOGO heralds a new era of computer-literate pets. DOGO commands include
    SIT, STAY, HEEL, and ROLL OVER. An innovative feature of DOGO is "puppy
    graphics", a small cocker spaniel that occasionally leaves a deposit as
    it travels across the screen.
    %
    THE LESSER-KNOWN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES #16: C-

    This language was named for the grade received by its creator when he
    submitted it as a class project in a graduate programming class. C- is best
    described as a "low-level" programming language. In fact, the language
    generally requires more C- statements than machine-code statements to
    execute a given task. In this respect, it is very similar to COBOL.
    %
    THE LESSER-KNOWN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES #17: SARTRE

    Named after the late existential philosopher, SARTRE is an extremely
    unstructured language. Statements in SARTRE have no purpose; they just are.
    Thus SARTRE programs are left to define their own functions. SARTRE
    programmers tend to be boring and depressed, and are no fun at parties.
    %
    THE LESSER-KNOWN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES #18: FIFTH

    FIFTH is a precision mathematical language in which the data types
    refer to quantity. The data types range from CC, OUNCE, SHOT, and
    JIGGER to FIFTH (hence the name of the language), LITER, MAGNUM and
    BLOTTO. Commands refer to ingredients such as CHABLIS, CHARDONNAY,
    CABERNET, GIN, VERMOUTH, VODKA, SCOTCH, and WHATEVERSAROUND.

    The many versions of the FIFTH language reflect the sophistication and
    financial status of its users. Commands in the ELITE dialect include
    VSOP and LAFITE, while commands in the GUTTER dialect include HOOTCH
    and RIPPLE. The latter is a favorite of frustrated FORTH programmers
    who end up using this language.
    %
    THE LESSER-KNOWN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES #2: RENE

    Named after the famous French philosopher and mathematician Rene DesCartes,
    RENE is a language used for artificial intelligence. The language is being
    developed at the Chicago Center of Machine Politics and Programming under a
    grant from the Jane Byrne Victory Fund. A spokesman described the language
    as "Just as great as dis [sic] city of ours."

    The center is very pleased with progress to date. They say they have almost
    succeeded in getting a VAX to think. However, sources inside the
    organization say that each time the machine fails to think it ceases to exist.
    %
    THE LESSER-KNOWN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES #8: LAIDBACK

    This language was developed at the Marin County Center for T'ai Chi,
    Mellowness and Computer Programming (now defunct), as an alternative to
    the more intense atmosphere in nearby Silicon Valley.

    The center was ideal for programmers who liked to soak in hot tubs while
    they worked. Unfortunately few programmers could survive there because the
    center outlawed Pizza and Coca-Cola in favor of Tofu and Perrier.

    Many mourn the demise of LAIDBACK because of its reputation as a gentle and
    non-threatening language since all error messages are in lower case. For
    example, LAIDBACK responded to syntax errors with the message:

    "i hate to bother you, but i just can't relate to that. can
    you find the time to try it again?"
     
  9. Shaun.P macrumors 68000

    Shaun.P

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    #9


    High level languages are languages that are generally easy to program in. The processor cannot understand high level languages, so high level languages must be translated into a low level language (such as machine code i.e. binary) so the processor can understand them.

    High level languages are better because they are easier to program with with due to using english like words and phrases.

    What do you think is easier to learn to get the text HELLO WORLD to appear on the screen?

    PRINT "HELLO WORLD"

    or

    01010000010100100100100101001110010101000010000000100010010010000100010101001100
    010011000100111100100000010101110100111101010010010011000100010000100010?

    They are also better because programming environments can usually detect syntax errors and often show you the location of errors.

    A disadvantage is that they have to be translated to be understood by the processor.
     
  10. Shaun.P macrumors 68000

    Shaun.P

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    #10
    And as for 5 high level programming languages - there are more than 5. There are a lot...

    COMAL (I don't think this is very popular but I used it at school PRINT "HELLO WORLD" :))... ADA... FORTRAN... PASCAL... PROLOG.
     
  11. Shaun.P macrumors 68000

    Shaun.P

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    #11
    Absolutely hilarious!
     
  12. MongoTheGeek macrumors 68040

    MongoTheGeek

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    #12
    I was rather disappointed that OSX didn't ship with the fortune cookie program
     

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