What are the differences between Snow Leopard and Snow Leopard Server?

Discussion in 'Mac OS X Server, Xserve, and Networking' started by thiagos, Sep 26, 2009.

  1. thiagos macrumors 6502

    thiagos

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    #1
    I have been thinking about buying the OSX Snow Leopard Server version.
    What are the pros and cons between both systems? Would the server version be slower or faster than the standard Snow Leopard? Does it have Bootcamp?

    Please only reply if you are knowledgeable on the subject.

    Thanks...
     
  2. dmmcintyre3 macrumors 68020

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    #2
    Server is just the unix server software with an Apple style GUI, You can get everything it offers from client if you can use terminal and google.
     
  3. calderone macrumors 68040

    calderone

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    #3
    Many things, yes. Everything? No.
     
  4. thiagos thread starter macrumors 6502

    thiagos

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    #4
    I still don't get it though, would it work fine on a MacBook Pro? What is an Unix Server Software? The same one windows NT had?
    Does it include all the features that Retail Snow Leopard 10.6 has?
     
  5. calderone macrumors 68040

    calderone

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    #5
    I am going to be honest with you. Since you are asking these questions, I can tell you that you don't need it. It adds no value for you over Snow Leopard Client.

    Just buy Snow Leopard client.
     
  6. pdjudd macrumors 601

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    #6
    Are you running a server? Honestly, I can tell you that you are not and for that reason alone, you do not need SL Server. Snow Leopard Server is not a client OS and it is not intended to be run on a laptop.
     
  7. Consultant macrumors G5

    Consultant

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  8. pdjudd macrumors 601

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    #8
    The most succinct answer to this question.
     
  9. thiagos thread starter macrumors 6502

    thiagos

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    #9
    It infuriates me, it is incredible that I ask a question in terms of the difference and what it means and people actually reply telling me that I don't need something. How do they know what I need or not? What if $500 does not make a difference to me and I feel like spending it?
    I have seriously given up on these forums...
     
  10. electroshock macrumors 6502a

    electroshock

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    #10
    Haven't run Server personally, but can't imagine it being 'faster' than the non-server edition. It's mainly designed to support hosting of various types of content (files, email, web, ichat, etc.) as well as to manage mostly LAN-based client Macs -- installation, patching, monitoring, supporting (e.g. tech support-wise such as viewing screens of your clients), etc.

    http://www.apple.com/server/macosx/features/
    http://www.apple.com/server/macosx/servers-made-easy.html

    Perhaps someone else who's actually run Server will pipe up here with more comments at some point.
     
  11. milk242 macrumors 6502a

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    #11
    What are your computing intentions? It's sort of hard to run down a list comparing the two without knowing what you want to do with your computer.
     
  12. thiagos thread starter macrumors 6502

    thiagos

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    #12
    Well basically I want to use one of my MacBook Pros as a desktop to share my printer, scanner, address books and ftp between my other laptops. I won't be doing any intensive stuff...
    Basically I wanted to know if I will have to compromise anything by switching from a client to a server?
     
  13. pdjudd macrumors 601

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    #13
    We are not trying to be insulting. We are simply saying that if you do not understand what a server operating system is, you are either: In over your head or not in need of the operating system. Simply put, the question you asked indicated to us that you did not need a server operating system. When you ask about Server OS, you tend to know what they are and you know if you need them or not. The range of knowledge between the client and server are miles apart. Server software is aimed toward formal server environments where your goal is providing dedicated resources to many users. The amount of knowledge involved is very advanced. We are trying to level to you by saying that server is out of the league of what your needs are. Sorry, but as an IT professional, you have to be blunt sometimes.

    You can accomplish all of those tasks on the client operating system. The very fact that you are not doing anything intense almost makes using OSX server akin to taking a cannon to a pistol range. It is waaaaay overkill.
     
  14. calderone macrumors 68040

    calderone

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    #14
    Look man. This isn't a walk in the park. You don't just "switch" from client to server. Server setups that include more advanced services are complex.

    If all you want to do is share stuff between computers, you don't need Mac OS server. The only thing you mentioned that sounds ever so advanced is address book sharing. This can be done by syncing your address books with Google or Yahoo. This is found in the Address Book preferences. See attached image.

    There are a few reasons that others and I said you do not need it. First off, you didn't actually say what you wanted to do with it. Second, it is easy to gauge someone's knowledge on the subject from how they write. And what your wrote here screamed "I don't know what I am talking about."

    Now that you have stated what you want. I can tell you that no, you do not need Snow Leopard Server to complete the tasks you wish. You can complete them all with Snow Leopard client, and from what you listed you can do them all without 3rd party software as well.

    Maybe you want Snow Leopard server. What does that mean for you? Well, given the fact that you haven't figured out how to do these tasks in the client version, you will have no clue what to do with server. In fact, the setup assistant will probably make you want to turn it off and reinstall client.

    Let me say this: Snow Leopard Server is not for a home user with no interest in administration. If you buy it to simply serve some files, you are an idiot with too much money. And not only that, the chances of you setting it up properly are slim to none, if you assume you will simply check boxes like you do in client.

    Again, if you simply want to share out some files, figure it out in client. All you do is check some boxes, click some names for permissions and done.

    Read this carefully: I am not saying you are an idiot. If you genuinely have an interest in actually learning how to do this, by all means go for it. People here will help you and there is a wealth of knowledge all over the internet.

    That is not what I am sensing here though. You asked if the OS X Server has Bootcamp. Why would anyone serving things from a machine want to boot into another OS? This was just one of the flags that you don't need OS X Server.

    Credentials (as if they mean anything): Administer my own home server with Mac OS X server, this includes Directory Services among others. Currently studying for my ACSA.
     
  15. pdjudd macrumors 601

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    #15
    Exactly. Its really for the OP’s benefit. If you (generally) don’t know what the product is all about, and that product is really complex (like server os’s are), than we are not going to recommend it to you because its going to frustrate you. There is no sense in even approaching a subject that does not apply.

    EDIT: We take this seriously, because OSX server, compared to the client, is really serious stuff - they are waay different beasts.

    Exactly. Once you (general) have a grasp on what your dealing with, it becomes a lot easier to takes your intentions correctly. In fact, I am trying to learn the server software myself. I am barely into it and I already know that it can be really complex. I ain’t giving up though!
     
  16. milk242 macrumors 6502a

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    #16
    Well the client version of snow leopard can do all that out of the box except being a ftp server, but they have free ftp server software online that are very easy to use. Basically the main purpose of SL server is for administration of other computers on your intranet.

    You won't be compromising anything by switching to server, but its more complicated to use and might as well save your money for accessories for your laptop as it's not needed to do any of the tasks you are looking for.
     
  17. nufanec macrumors regular

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    #17
    Actually you can set up client as a simple ftp server. Create a remote login account if you don't want to use your own, then set up sharing for any folders you want then enable sharing of files, folders, or drives by ftp. Simples.
     
  18. phineas macrumors regular

    phineas

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    #18
    Difference between the two OS's

    I see that you live in NYC, I would highly and strongly suggest that you goto the apple store "Manhatten, ? One with the glass entrance" and talk to the business customer care people.

    Here in Albany they just had a comparison of what is the difference and they gave away trial copies of SL Server that expire the end of January.

    If you get a proper presentation it will answer your questions allot better than people telling you this and that.

    This forum cracks me up when asking questions about an APPLE product and others chime in and say goto windows or HP entertainment .

    Seriously goto not call goto the Apple store and talk to the people that know what there talking about and can present it too you.

    Best of Luck

    Take what information you get on a forum with a grain of salt and not as gospel .
     
  19. pdjudd macrumors 601

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    #19
    When people are asking about a product that is better suited in the windows realm than in the Mac one, we recommend the Windows solution. The blunt fact is, while OSX Server can be used in a users home, there is no need to do that simply because the Server features are aimed at enterprise and business users. In this case, the OP would be wasting his money just to get an OS that he is not going to be using. People are going to recommend Windows home server because it is a product targeted at that subset of users (despite the fact that Windows has yet to be mentioned by anyone in this thread as a recommendation).

    It is pointless to advise a solution that is way overkill and can cause much more headache than is needed. WHile the OP is free to persue OSX server should he wish to do so, we recommend other options such as the regular Client OSX
     
  20. phineas macrumors regular

    phineas

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    #20
    We? and who is "WE" and once again do WE know the full spec's behind what the user/OP really wants to do before making ASSUMPTIONS, and suggestions.

    Plain and simple the OP should talk to someone that is more versed in the topic and get a hands on feel, and the software for FREE , let he or she play and find out on there own.

    Take what information is giving in the forums with a grain of salt. :D
     
  21. bartzilla macrumors 6502a

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    #21
    The best you could hope for from such a switch is that you only wasted a bit of money buying something you did not need.

    You might not have wanted to hear "If you have to ask, you don't need/want it" but sorry - that is sometimes the correct answer.
     
  22. pdjudd macrumors 601

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    #22
    The OP asked a question involving a subject that was way out of his class (like asking what a server OS was). While it may sound crass, we told him out right that if he had no idea what a server OS provided, it was not going to meet his needs regardless of what they were. As soon as he told us what he wanted, the answer did not change. Several people in this post pretty much agreed that OSX server was not the right solution. The rest of us were trying to explain to him what OSX server was

    He asked a question that indicated that an expert was not needed. The fact is, playing with a server OS isn't going to solve his needs. You are bringing up another thing altogether. Nobody brought up the trial because:

    1) He doesn't need it.
    2) Without lying, the trial is only intended for businesses.
    3) If the OP wanted to learn about server OS's a 30 day trail isn't going to do much.

    Except that our advice was correct. He does not need the Server OS, his needs can be fulfilled perfectly with the Client OS as it stands. That answer came from at least 2 IT professionals (myself and calderone). No salt necessary.

    Now if the OP wanted to learn about server operating systems like OSX server, we could address that topic. He was asking a question that is akin to saying "I need a weapon, what should I get a pistol or a cannon". Nobody is going to suggest a cannon unless you can convince us you know the difference right away.

    Calderone put it best with two quotes:
    and
    and most importantly:
    Emphasis mine. If he wants to learn about Server OS's thats one thing - we covered that. Its another for someone to ask us "What do I need" when the choices are the default and something that requires a very specific skill set that he does not demonstrate. All we are doing is being blunt enough to tell him that he is approaching serious stuff.
     
  23. itou macrumors regular

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    #23
    because you have time that others' don't.
    we come here to help and for help, not to roll around and ask about the weather. "if you don't know, you don't need it." (good answer.)
     
  24. thiagos thread starter macrumors 6502

    thiagos

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    #24
    If you were so "busy", you wouldn't be in a forum on the first place...
     
  25. pdjudd macrumors 601

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    #25
    There is a difference between answering simple questions like “how do I do this” or “Can OSX server do this” versus “what is the difference between the client and server and what is a server OS” the former are things we can address easily, the latter is a question in which the answer was not going to mean much. We can get into the technical aspects of OSX server until the cows come home, but if the answer goes over your head, there is only so much we can say before telling you outright that you don’t need something.

    Simply put, we take this stuff seriously and sometimes, a blunt answer is appropriate. We do not intend to insult you, but simply put, the answer to your question is not really appropriate for a forum and is best done by research. There really isn’t much point into detailing things that you aren’t going to understand. We cut to the chase, figured out that you don’t know what the server os was, knew that telling you would be pointless (you need to know something about server OS functions to understand), so we honestly said that by the fourth response, that OSX server was not going to benefit you. We cut to the chase and be blunt because this is serious stuff.

    Server OS' are one of those things that you know that you need because you know enough of the client OS to know their limitations. Thats just how it works. Its not like upgrading from Windows Basic to Home Premium. It’s not that kind of transition.
     

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