What color calibration profile do you use?

Discussion in 'macOS' started by kabunaru, Jan 30, 2008.

  1. kabunaru Guest

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    Jan 28, 2008
    #1
    What color calibration profile do you use and why?
     
  2. ifonline macrumors regular

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    Jun 25, 2007
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    Braselton, Georgia
    #2
    A custom profile made every two weeks or so from an i1 Display 2. Why? Because accurate color is important for photography.
     
  3. heatmiser macrumors 68020

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    Dec 6, 2007
    #3
    I leave it on the default color lcd setting. Looked strange at first. Now it's natural.
     
  4. Sdahe macrumors 68000

    Sdahe

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    Oct 26, 2007
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    San Juan, PR
    #4
    Is it good to make a new color setting every two weeks?... I mean, is it necessary?
     
  5. adjei7 macrumors member

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    Nov 25, 2007
    #5
    I ask the same question. Does the monitor go out of sync or something?
     
  6. richard.mac macrumors 603

    richard.mac

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    #6
    i use the default Cinema HD profile on my Cinema Display and the default Color LCD profile on my MacBook Pro but they both look different. how can i make both displays look similar?

    i tried using the advanced settings in Calibration Assistant but its very hard to make them match. if i put the Cinema HD profile on the Macbook Pro's display its looks awful, all blue and washed out.
     
  7. Alan Sparks macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    #7
    For some reason, Apple seem to have included a slightly washed out default colour profile in their latest range of Macs (i.e. from the aluminium iMac onwards).

    Calibrating screens can be a complex task depending on how 'into it' you have to be. Calling someone out to calibrate for print purposes for example where clients depend on a correctly calibrated passage from screen to the press.

    However!

    Just click Adobe RBG (1998) in 'any instance' (for desktop and laptop use). This is a very credible all-purpose colour calibration for rich dark tones, good colour saturation and an even balance of mid-tones and highlights.

    The difference between that setting, and spending hours calibration yourself is negligible. That is, unless you are a professional desperately in need of the perfect alignment of colours.
     
  8. Alan Sparks macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    #8
    This is the calibration tool mentioned by 'ifonline' (above):

    http://www.letsgodigital.org/en/13402/xrite_i1_color_calibration/

    As screens have an organic nature of 'drifting a bit', it's always prudent to calibrate on a regular basis.

    But again, this is for professional use only - and in any case, the differences are minute.
     
  9. ifonline macrumors regular

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    Braselton, Georgia
    #9
    Yes, as a monitor is capable of shifting color over time. It might be a slight shift, but a shift nonetheless, and if accurate color is important for your work, then the monitor needs to be re-calibrated periodically to adjust for this shift.

    You would need to either get a hardware calibration tool such as the i1 Display 2 or Spyder3, or spend a lot of time trying to do it by hand only to discover, as you have, that it is very difficult to do. Bear in mind, though, that using a hardware tool isn't necessarily easy either, but it is easier and more accurate.

    For general use, certainly the default profiles are good enough.
     
  10. ifonline macrumors regular

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    #10
  11. montycat macrumors 6502

    montycat

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    Florida
    #11
    Where do I find this setting? I looked everywhere for this. MC
     
  12. madfresh macrumors regular

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    Dec 21, 2006
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    #12
    System Preferences - Displays - Color(make sure show profiles for this display only is unchecked) - Adobe RGB 1998 should be in the list
     
  13. JSchwage macrumors 6502a

    JSchwage

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    May 5, 2006
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    #13
    I made my own custom color profile using the advanced mode in the color calibration tool. It took about an hour to finally get it right, but now my display looks great. It's amazing how washed out and yellow-tinted the default color profile was on my MacBook.
     
  14. kabunaru thread starter Guest

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    Jan 28, 2008
    #14
    Could you please post this profile? I would like to try it. Thank you. :)
     
  15. richard.mac macrumors 603

    richard.mac

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    #15
    thanks for this. do you think this profile should be used on a Cinema Display? i tried it and it looked a bit dark and vibrant. i could get used to it but im jsut wondering whether the Cinema Displays should use this? also what about AppleRBG?

    thank you very much for this. i dont think ill buy calibration hardware as i dont need it as im not in the professional field. i think ill just play around with the assistant for a while

    i would also like to try out this profile, if its alright with you? :)
     
  16. Alan Sparks macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2006
    #16
    Dark and vibrant - as opposed to washed out?

    Surely that's a positive step?

    It's usually a good idea to use AdobeRGB (for it's vibrancy and depth), but to drop the brightness on your monitor to about a quarter strength, raising only to tackle any photo editing you might want to do or for when viewing high quality movies etc.

    I suggested AdobeRGB to you because it's a tried and trusted setting used in the print and design industry, where a monitor is crucial in the process.

    And incidentally, if you buy the latest Photoshop, you will see the AdobeRGB setting sat in readiness from 1998!

    That should tell you something.
     
  17. theman macrumors 6502a

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    Jul 26, 2007
    #17
    USE SUPERCAL:

    http://www.bergdesign.com/supercal/

    It's freeware that works very well for those who can't afford a colorimeter (i.e. most people), and it made my MBP screen look great. The profiles that come on your Mac are not made for your screen, and are therefore unlikely to work well. All screens are different. You need to adjust gamma, white levels, etc. If you are a professional photographer, image editor, you definitely need to invest in a colorimeter though.
     
  18. Father Jack macrumors 68020

    Father Jack

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    Jan 1, 2007
    Location:
    Ireland
    #18
    Nothing beats using a good calibration tool. I use Spyder 2 Pro every two weeks, it only take about 10 minutes to do .. :)
     
  19. ::Lisa:: macrumors 6502a

    ::Lisa::

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    Oct 28, 2007
    Location:
    Nottingham, UK
    #19
    I'm using the Color LCD profile at the moment. I do Photography and the only one that matches my prints good until I can afford to buy some proper calibration software etc.

    As soon as I buy it though, I will use.
     
  20. mountainman macrumors member

    mountainman

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    Sep 13, 2007
    Location:
    North of Denver, Colorado
    #20
    I use a custom profile generated by a Spyder2 generally once a month or so. I don't do it as often as some others on here.
     
  21. kabunaru thread starter Guest

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    Jan 28, 2008
    #21
    I tried AdoberRGB but couldn't get used to it. ColorMatch RGB on the other hand, I got used to and I am currently using it. :) Almost perfect profile.
     

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