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Squuiid

macrumors 68000
Oct 31, 2006
1,868
1,702
thanks so much
Just make sure you follow the video on another thread which shows the orientation to place the chip in the vice. As long as you do this you should have no problems. I've done 7 chips using this vice and every one was easy. You do need to turn the handle harder than you would think but just keep going and it'll 'pop'.
 

JedNZ

macrumors 6502a
Dec 6, 2015
626
237
Deep South
I took the plunge after reading the experiences of other macrumors members and watching numerous YouTube videos. Some hints from me:
• I highly recommend that you do some testing on some cheap but similar CPUs to start with as it'll help you work out how much pressure is required.
• Squuid's right - much more squeeze than I initially thought. In my case the lids didn't pop off so much as they just let go, and I had to take care because I didn't realise they had come off. I ruined two cheap ones when the pressure stripped the screw rod (the long screw arm) so a quality vice is highly recommended.
• Use a good amount of tape with firm cardboard (or other packing material) on the vice edges - this will keep the CPU in place and prevent it from shifting and then doing damage.
• Enjoy the rewards of doing this fantastic upgrade!
 
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ActionableMango

macrumors G3
Sep 21, 2010
9,612
6,907
FWIW, the opposite can be true as well. In the video the guy is using so much pressure that he's shaking everything and he said his first CPU went flying. So I was expecting a Herculean effort for mine but they came off very easily. In fact for the second and third CPUs I just used one hand on the handle with the other hand holding underneath to catch.
 

Erlang

macrumors member
Dec 23, 2009
97
18
SW, UK
I used 4 razor blades and a micro gas torch, with the CPU's upside down so the lids fell away. Both went well, but sweaty palm stuff.
 

owbp

macrumors 6502a
Jan 28, 2016
719
245
Belgrade, Serbia
I know there are lots of topics on this subject, but lets post here since it is the newest one.

While still deciding whether to get X5675 or X5690 for my 4,1 (fan speeds being the main factor) i had to snatch a pair of X5570's as a test mules for 22€ on eBay recently and they've just arrived.
Now, before that, i've tried delidding W3520 (leftover from my single CPU 4,1) and vice method worked great, really easy to do.
The thing i'm not sure on is how much soldier were you all removing from die, and what was your final "polishing" step?
I've removed quite a bit of it with just the credit card, but surface still feels (and looks) rough.
What would you recommend? Sand paper, polishing paste or something else?
IMG_0135.jpg
 

owbp

macrumors 6502a
Jan 28, 2016
719
245
Belgrade, Serbia
Job done. :)
I've used credit card for the first pass, then some kind of scraping knife (razor was too flexible so i skipped it), first pass when polishing was done with eraser (regular, for graphite pencils) and last one was done with cloth for silver cleaning.
I'm not completely satisfied with the results, but considering the tools i had, it's quite ok.
Here are some pictures:
- seconds after delid with vice
IMG_0137.JPG
-best credit card shine i could get
IMG_0138.JPG
- eraser polish™
IMG_0139.JPG IMG_0140.JPG IMG_0141.JPG
-Tools used
IMG_0145.jpg
-Final pass with cloth for cleaning silver
IMG_0149.JPG
 

JedNZ

macrumors 6502a
Dec 6, 2015
626
237
Deep South
Yeah that looks good owbp. I used a credit card and a spludger to remove the excess solder, and then used very fine 600+ sandpaper to remove the remaining solder **very carefully**.

If using sandpaper:
• Wrap/tape/secure the sandpaper to a solid block so that the sandpaper doesn't move.
• Only move the sandpaper one way across the CPU surface – don't rock backwards and forwards as this could result in an uneven surface.
 
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