What difference will HD monitors make to today's monitors on Graphic Design?

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by eclipse, Mar 2, 2008.

  1. eclipse macrumors 6502a

    eclipse

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
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    Sydney
    #1
    Hi all,
    when Blue-Ray hits... what difference will it make to the monitors going HD, and for any graphic designers out there, will it make a huge or negligible influence on your workflow?
     
  2. decksnap macrumors 68040

    decksnap

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    Apr 11, 2003
    #2
    What's the connection to Blue-Ray? Many screens are HD now. Not sure the question here.
     
  3. eclipse thread starter macrumors 6502a

    eclipse

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    Sydney
    #3
    Are the latest 23 inch aluminium mac monitors HD?
     
  4. Mackilroy macrumors 68040

    Mackilroy

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    Jun 29, 2006
    #4
    I think you're confused as to what HD means. PC monitors have been able to hit resolutions much higher than 1080p for some time - witness the 2560x1600 30" Apple makes.
     
  5. elppa macrumors 68040

    elppa

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    Nov 26, 2003
    #5
    And depending on what you class as HD, every MacBook has a HD screen.

    720p.
     
  6. eclipse thread starter macrumors 6502a

    eclipse

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    #6
    Yeah, I was confused as well. My local reseller said something about the monitors not being HD like the TV's. :confused: It's got me. What sort of resolutions do people mean when they say HD anyway? :eek:
     
  7. basesloaded190 macrumors 68030

    basesloaded190

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    Oct 16, 2007
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    #7
    people talking about HD they are either talking about 720p, 1080i, or 1080p. like others have said, many monitors can already handle these resolutions and a lot can handle more.
     
  8. elppa macrumors 68040

    elppa

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2003
    #8
    1080p – 1,920x1,080px
    720p – 1,280x720px
    480p – 852x480px

    480p isn't classed by many as HD. MacBooks are 1280 x 800 so they do 720p. Apple Cinema Displays (23" and 30") are big enough for 1080p. You can also get panel as Build to Order option for the MacBook Pro which does 1080p as well (1920x1200px).
     
  9. vohdoun macrumors 65816

    vohdoun

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    Jan 23, 2006
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    #9
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-definition_television

    3.2 High-Definition Display Resolutions. Scroll down.

    Standard definition: 720×576 576i
    480i/p format is 720×480
    720p format is 1280 × 720
    1080i format is 1920 × 1080
    1080p format is 1920×1080

    I think those are right.

    [Edit] elppa has it corrected.
     
  10. JrdBeau macrumors member

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    Oct 10, 2002
    Location:
    San Jose, CA
    #10
    Are you maybe referring to being able to play back copyrighted HD content? I know HDMI and DisplayPort can play back HD content as they support HDCP. DVI does not support HDCP to my knowledge. Does this affect the Mac world like it does the PC world?
     
  11. vohdoun macrumors 65816

    vohdoun

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    #11
    People who have connected their display to their PS3 over HDMI to DVI results a black screen, because the display doesn't have HDCP.

    It will go over DVI, as they are selling the cables. HDMI to DVI. Just you're SOL if your display doesn't have HDCP.
     
  12. crm114 macrumors member

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    Feb 20, 2008
    Location:
    Midwest
    #12
    if the ? is about workflow and graphic design output - then i think the issue is larger file sizes for video output and other types of layout (pdfs and slideshow resolution).

    Regardless of the monitor you work on, everyone will expect higher def. output - so files are larger (1080 tall instead of 480 tall) which will lead to slower times to create content. Its already happening with me - most renderings i do are now saved at 1280 x 760, instead of the older 720 x 480 res that i have been using for the last ten years. It doesnt affect printed media as much - since images need to be at super high res anyway.

    It means that we will all need faster computers to keep up with the need for larger graphics.

    I think the bigger issue is the lack of control and quality realted to LCD monitors compared to CRT's - i have both and the CRT still gives me better color and adds a softness to the viewed image that is closer ot what i print than what i see on a lcd panel. I know that there are really great LCD's out there that could solve this issue - i just cant afford them...
     

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