what do you think of this picture?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by isianto, Dec 13, 2009.

  1. isianto macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2007
    Location:
    Indonesia
    #1
    I took a picture in the office, with a single flash and 50mm f 8, I believe
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Mars478 macrumors 6502a

    Mars478

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    Location:
    NYC, NY
    #2
    It's nice, background is a little too busy though.
     
  3. isianto thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2007
    Location:
    Indonesia
    #3
    Thanks, I think I should shoot it at f 2.8 to make background more blur. do you think it will help? since I can't choose the background ^_^ (she's still working)
     
  4. Mars478 macrumors 6502a

    Mars478

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    Location:
    NYC, NY
    #4
    Blurring the background will make it much better. Give it a shot. (hahah get it?)
    Sorry.
     
  5. stagi macrumors 65816

    stagi

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2006
    #5
    Try and frame it a little different, the composition is very rigid. maybe move her over to the right side of the frame and keep it full frame instead of cropping into a square.
     
  6. Mars478 macrumors 6502a

    Mars478

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    Location:
    NYC, NY
    #6
    Yeah and maybe a little more of her face, but not looking at the lens.
     
  7. Acsom macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2009
    #7
    Critique is subjective, and I'm not a photo teacher, so take this for what it is worth (ie, nothing):


    It's cropped too tight to be interesting. The only thing really going on is the way the lines lead all toward the center. But it's not horrible. It's not like there are so many things wrong with it that there's nowhere to start, but there isn't anything especially praiseworthy, either.

    Speaking for myself, I find that the challenge is really learning how to see a photograph. When you shoot, you don't just put a frame around a slice of the world and flatten it; by doing that, you create a new thing, a photograph. And there is a way that peoples' minds look at and then see what you've chosen to create. To some extent, you should learn to compose within those expectations, and when you know them implicitly, and you are able to frame shots in your mind with ease, then break them selectively to make your photos stand out.

    If you do that, and you are of average talent, you should get about a hundred decent photos every thousand shots or so, and maybe one or two really outstanding ones out of that thousand. You'll be like a really good guitar player in a bar band. And there's nothing wrong with that, I'd love to be that good some day.

    For that specific shot, there is probably something there; capturing the woman in an introspective moment at work, maybe? Pulled back it might be able to work, but I don't know because I can't see the rest of the scene.
     
  8. isianto thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2007
    Location:
    Indonesia
    #8
    Acsom thanks for the explanation, but I have a question, just so I can I understand better. Forgive me first for my english. When I took this particular picture, I saw the background is kind of distracting, because the background is kind of orange color, the fax machine right behind her, the black lcd in front of her, that's why when I took this picture, I frame it tight. I agree with marsman478 after retrospect. You're right, I'm still a very beginner in seeing the scene, for that is there any good book that I can read?
    Stagi, thanks I will try it next time
    Thanks all for the critiques, I'm really appreciate it, and I do want to be better, that's why I need more critique, read more book, shoot alot more like Acsom's sugestion. Thanks again
     
  9. jackerin macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2008
    Location:
    Finland
  10. flosseR macrumors 6502a

    flosseR

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2009
    Location:
    the cold dark north
    #10
    agreed, this is the third thread that this image pops up. Like mentioned, nothing too wrong with it, but uninteresting.
    It is clean, i give you that in terms of even lighting but I think the burning question that you cannot really easily decipher... whats the point or story of the image? And don't you have any more? ...
     
  11. daflake macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2008
    #11
    I don't like the angle of the shot and the image seems a bit too hot for my liking. What are you trying to convey with the photo? What or who is the subject? If her hair was the subject then you did better, but if she was the subject she looks like she is ignoring you. You also cut off her head which is not something you should do with a person as the subject.

    If you are new to photography don't buy anything further. Just shoot lots of photos and play for a while. Also, people are the hardest subjects to really get right in my opinion. Good luck...
     
  12. Acsom macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2009
    #12
    Post it uncropped so we can see it; maybe there isn't a photograph there.

    When I first started shooting, I was handicapped because I think the entire world is beautiful and interesting, and I couldn't understand why everything I shot didn't reflect what I saw. But if it was that easy, then photography would have no value. Your audience's eyes take paths through what you show them, and the combination of subject and that path their eyes will take (determined by lines, colors, tonal gradations, patterns, etc) will determine how they react to what you've chosen to present.

    Everyone always recommends Bryan Peterson's Understanding Exposure; I agree that it is an excellent place to start. For composition, I'm not sure; I like Michael Freeman's books, but others think they are pompous and not very useful. I'll defer to others on that one, I picked up the basic composition rules off the internet somewhere.

    I'm not a great photographer by any means, but I've caught some nice shots. Some great shots have been completely accidental; others I've thought about for days and weeks, then went out and just shot them, exactly as I'd thought. And sometimes I've done that and been disappointed, and often the accidental shots are not that good. There's no figuring it. Just take a camera with you and shoot pictures.
     
  13. isianto thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2007
    Location:
    Indonesia
    #13
    Thanks for the critique, you're right it's not the hair, but the face. Sorry daflake, I'm really confused, I do try to read a lot from the internet about portrait, and most of them say that it's ok not to take the whole head. My question is when is it ok and when is it not ok?


    Please be patient with me. I will post new images, when I took them, and try to apply the critiques, I really appreciate all the criticism in here. I do feel I need help.

    unfortunately you're right. When I took that picture, I frame it like that. I can see what you mean, after I browsed the internet about composition, and read what you write. Correct me if I'm wrong, what you mean for this particular shot is , it will be a better picture, if I can convey the surrounding environment at that time, so it will give more story (like what's she's doing, or something like that), am I right?
    sorry, if I asks a lot of questions. I've read the "Bryan Peterson's Understanding Exposure", will definately find another book.
    Thanks again
     
  14. Acsom macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2009
    #14
    I'm glad you ask a lot of questions. Remember to verify all the answers you get, though; just because I'm answering doesn't mean I'm right. I THINK I am, but I'm not an expert, just another guy learning as I go along. This happens to be an area where I've already made the same mistakes, and I think I can help.

    In this instance, yes. It doesn't have to tell a story, but pictures with people often do. Also, though, the subject has no room to breathe; the shot is claustrophobic. Look at the lines in the upper left corner, and the shoulders, and even the headphones, although they fork; all the lines lead to the center. The swoop of the hair is nice, but it just forms a whorl around the face, it doesn't offset the lines. That isn't bad in and of itself, the closed in feeling, but it doesn't do anything for this particular subject. Everything is drawn to the center, and she's shutting it out by ignoring it. If there is a story, the story is, "just another person who won't/didn't/doesn't make eye contact during a typical day."

    Now, think of the same shot, the same place, except she is looking up at the camera and beaming, smiling. Everything is pointing toward the center and she is like the sun. Give her some more room around the edges, let her free some. It might not work as a photo, but it also might, with everything radiating to and from a beautiful and friendly face. Try the shot with her centered, then try it with her out of the center, see what looks better. Then think of why you like one or the other better.

    (That is what I mean when say I think about photos sometimes for several days before taking them. I put them together in my mind, then when I am ready they look exactly like I want them to. Sometimes they aren't as good as I expect them to be, but often they are, and that is very satisfying when that happens.)
     
  15. isianto thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2007
    Location:
    Indonesia
    #15
    Thanks Acsom, you're really helpfull and the rest of the thread also help me alot. I think I understand what you're saying, but for sure I need to take a picture to see whether I really understand or not. thanks again
     

Share This Page