What does this mean?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by rsm5068, Feb 25, 2008.

  1. rsm5068 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    #1
    In school we have some Out dated iBooks that are waiting to be replaced in our english department. After checking the specs on these (I was having some issues watching Diggnation on-line) I saw the following image. What does Built-In mean?
     

    Attached Files:

  2. angrygolfer macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2007
    Location:
    PA
    #2
    It's not a removable chip. It is soldered on the system board
     
  3. AdeFowler macrumors 68020

    AdeFowler

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2004
    Location:
    England
  4. TEG macrumors 604

    TEG

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2002
    Location:
    Langley, Washington
    #4
    I believe that Built in means soldered to the motherboard. But there is another slot to allow expansion to 1.5 GB.

    TEG
     
  5. rsm5068 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
  6. MacBookJoePro macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2006
    #6
    Yea. Built-in means that the memory is soldered to the board. There should be an empty memory slot where you can buy more ram to expand. Older laptops including ibooks and powerbooks had memory soldered to the motherboard. Sometime the half the memory would be soldered to the motherboard and the other half was taking up the removable memory slot.

    -JoE
     
  7. tremendous macrumors 6502

    tremendous

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2008
    Location:
    UK? Yeah I'm OK. Stop asking.
    #7
    'out dated'.

    these machines will work completely fine (obvs barring hardware/software issues). my 1.33 powerbook is more than powerful enough for pretty much anything other than video editing stuff - and even then it's not too bad for basic work in imovie).
     
  8. rsm5068 thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2008
    #8
    I say out-dated due to the fact that we received a grant for the next couple of years to replace our current computers and buy new ones. The problem is that the money is released to us over time, not all at once. This year we bought over 650 MacBooks, but that still doesn't put a dent in a school trying to reach 1-to-1 with 3500+ students in it. I don't mean to hate on them, but to do some of our work with higher end video and programming the iBooks just can't keep up.
     

Share This Page