What happens when your computer is no longer supported

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by rshrugged, Nov 1, 2015.

  1. rshrugged macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2015
    #1
    Does Apple have a definitive 'end of life policy' ?

    What happens when Apple no longer provides security updates for your Mini/Pro/iMac, etc.., computer? Do you just practice safe hex?
     
  2. chscag macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2008
    Location:
    Fort Worth, Texas
    #2
    You should be practicing "safe hex" whether or not your machine is supported. ;) But to answer your question... I think you really mean when Apple stops providing security updates for the version of OS X you're running? As far as I'm aware, Apple is still issuing security updates for Snow Leopard until the end of this year. (as an example) When they stop issuing security updates for the version of OS X you're running you'll just have to be extra careful about picking up malware.

    I'm not sure when Apple considers a machine as "vintage" but when they do, you can no longer get support for it from an Apple store or Apple on line. Third party support would be your only avenue.
     
  3. CreatorCode macrumors regular

    CreatorCode

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2015
    Location:
    US
    #3
    If your Mac can't run a supported release of OS X, I wouldn't use it for anything on the Internet. If you do, you do so at your own risk.

    Every Mac made since 2008 or so can be updated to Mavericks, Mountain Lion, or El Capitan.

    (Those that can't be updated do make good Windows or Linux machines, if you need one.)
     
  4. Fishrrman macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #4
    OP asks:
    "What happens when Apple no longer provides security updates for your Mini/Pro/iMac, etc.., computer? Do you just practice safe hex?"

    Nothing much happens, really.
    You just keep using it.

    I've got a 2010 MacBook Pro that came with 10.6.3. I upgraded it to 10.6.8 (last update for Snow Leopard), and it still serves as my "main OS" on that laptop.
    It runs fine and gives me no problems.

    On my late-2012 Mini, I still use 10.8.5 Mountain Lion as my main OS.
    Again, runs fine and gives me no problems.

    Could the lack of available security updates cause trouble?
    I -suppose- that in theory, it could.
    But in my own experience of using Macs since 1987, I've never had a "security-related" problem that arose from using older OS's.
     
  5. rshrugged thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2015
    #5
    Thank you kindly. Your Snow Leopard example gives me some bread crumbs to follow. : -)

    No matter the OS, safe hex is the first and best line of defense. ; -)
     
  6. rshrugged thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2015
    #6
    At my first post, I wasn't even thinking about the Linux option. I've been researching my future move so much I think I'm suffering from info overload, hehe. Currently, I'm running three Linux guests in a Windows host using VirtualBox. I'm hoping when I make the move to OS X that that'll be the only OS I'll need to run.

    But just in case, it's on my list to look into potentially running VMs (and/or dual boot) in OS X. Have to learn the relevant OS X 'ins and outs'. Thank you kindly for the info and reminder. : -)
     
  7. rshrugged thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2015
    #7
    Thank you kindly. Posting your experience was helpful. : -)

    I've run both Windows and Linux without 'security' software, excepting imaging softwares. But those were supported OSs.

    I have some understanding of OS X's built-in security strengths. Do you use browser tools like a script blocker, for instance, in your unsupported OS to give you an extra edge? If you want to keep your strategies to yourself, please excuse my inquisitiveness. Thanks again.
     

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