What If The Client Doesn't or Can't Pay?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by redAPPLE, Jul 18, 2012.

  1. redAPPLE macrumors 68030

    redAPPLE

    Joined:
    May 7, 2002
    Location:
    2 Much Infinite Loops
    #1
    back story: i did some freelancing projects for a certain company (client support, installing printers, configuring email etc.). the work is like 5 hours per week. i get getting my money but the client stopped giving me my dues. the reasoning is, have a lot of stuff to do etc.

    unfortunately, there is no written agreement. (yeah yeah, i know. but for a few bucks/hr, i didn't think this would be necessary at the time)

    any suggestions what to do, to get my money? i have his passwords. what if i change his email, ebay, etc. passwords, so he stops getting emails and other stuff?

    thanks a lot.
     
  2. Macman45 macrumors demi-god

    Macman45

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2011
    Location:
    Somewhere Back In The Long Ago
    #2
    First and foremost:

    DO NOT change anything using his passwords. You will be liable for anything you do using them.

    Secondly. Walk away NOW taking your skills with you and make a mental note that you always, always have a written, legal agreement in future.

    Been there, got the tee-shirt. This guy is never ever going to pay you, and without a contract you have no recourse to the law either...Take your skills away now.
     
  3. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

    Joined:
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    Location:
    The Anthropocene
    #3
    Walk away, and don't even think about doing something with the passwords. How immature are you??
     
  4. ucfgrad93 macrumors P6

    ucfgrad93

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Colorado
    #4
    Does Judge Judy still have a show?:p

    Seriously, you might want to try small claims court. Other than that you are going to have to just take the loss. I agree with Macman45 that you shouldn't try and mess with your former client's passwords etc. In the future get a signed contract before you start working.
     
  5. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2005
    Location:
    New England
    #5
    What does this mean? Have you not completed the task in the expected number of hours?

    Definitely get it in writing next time.

    B
     
  6. Queso macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    #6
    Just walk away. If you're lucky they'll find themselves in a hole at some point and will call you out of desperation. Then you get the chance to tell them you're not interested because they never paid you for other work done, and you get closure on the whole thing.

    But learn from this. Get a purchase order before you put yourself out. It's not a hobby, it's a career.
     
  7. snberk103 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Location:
    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #7
    If you have a friend with the company, have them talk to the owner and get the passwords changed. If the owner wants to make things difficult for you they can claim you've been mucking around on their systems until those passwords are changed. How do you prove you didn't do anything?

    Also, if they get coincidentally get hacked by a someone else - when the authorities ask "who knows your passwords?" guess whose name is going to come up first?

    Get those passwords changed asap.
     
  8. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008
    Location:
    On tenterhooks
    #8
    By letting them prove that he did? :confused:

    Chalk it up as a lesson learned, and if he gets desperate down the road, ask for cash-up-front.
     
  9. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2008
    Location:
    The Anthropocene
    #9
    Sounds like a bunch of pinko nonsense if you ask me!
     
  10. snberk103 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Location:
    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #10
    It is much harder to prove the absence of an action. In this case the company merely has to say that they were breached, and that they are investigating all avenues - which includes the following the list of contractors. Since it is not an allegation, merely a statement of what they are doing there is no defamation.

    For our contractor, who may be trying to sign up a new client, they may now have to prove to the new client that they are not involved with the breach. In this case just the whiff of scandal may be enough to hurt their prospects. How much easier for our contractor to be able to say that the company changed the passwords the day they left - therefore the company is tooting up the creek without a beaver (to create a totally nonsensical new metaphor).
     
  11. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2008
    Location:
    On tenterhooks
    #11
    In that case one would assume that later, when their investigation has been completed, they would publish the names of vendors vindicated.

    With equal vigour!!
     
  12. snberk103 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Location:
    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #12
    Oh yeah, sure... I'm sure that happens all the time. Yep.... :)
     
  13. c073186 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2007
    #13
    If that is the case... unless you have been working and not getting paid for a long time, I wouldn't think the monetary effect would be that significant. Along with everyone else, I'd say leave it.
     
  14. Hold macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 19, 2010
    #14
    Leave now and never work for them again. If he won't pay, he won't pay. Don't lose more by trying to fight them.
     

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