What is a good SLR for starters in photography?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Frosteric901, Dec 24, 2014.

  1. Frosteric901 macrumors newbie

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    #1
    Hey guys, so I want to pick up a hobby that being photography but not sire which camera to get to start myself of. I was looking at the Nikon d3200 as a starting camera. I won't be into anything serious but just as a hobby with light photo editing. So any recommendations,?
     
  2. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

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    #2
    I started with the D3200. It was a great choice. Truth is there isn't really a bad choice to be made with today's modern cameras. They are all capable of taking great shots. I'd recommend going to a local camera shop, and try a few out. Second hand is a great way to go. Lots of people move on, so lots of these starter DSLR's get sold on for not a lot of money. Think about what you want to shoot, as the lens is the other consideration. I started with the kit 18-55 and it did a great job for what it is.
     
  3. VI™ macrumors 6502a

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    #3
    I will say this: You will get more for less with a used camera and used lenses. Bodies depreciate faster than a full sized truck. Lenses don't as much, but you can get a good used body and a good lens or two for the price of a new body and kit.

    What's your budget OP?
     
  4. Frosteric901 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    atm i have made a budget of $700 and while i know there are cameras a LOT more expensive i think to start off, with all the accessories and proper camera 700 is probably it. i mean if i can find a good price i was thinking of getting the twin lens kit for the d3200
     
  5. Ray2 macrumors 6502a

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    A camera is good only if its with you. You appear to have settled on a dslr, not exactly an easy or discreet carry. Might want to look at mirrorless cameras (Fuji, Oly, Sony) as well.

    I picked up a Fuji X100 just for grins a few years ago. Within a few months sold my D800 along with 40 years worth of shooting Nikon "stuff". Having a camera with me at all times created far more shooting opportunities and "photography fun" than dslr's ever did.

    Just a thought.
     
  6. MCAsan macrumors 601

    MCAsan

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    If just starting in photography, skip film cameras for digital....and skip DSLRs for mirrorless. Don't start with old technology.

    The good news is there are plenty of paths in digital mirrorless. You can go for systems that are based on 35mm size bodies and lenses, or the open micro four thirds systems. It is always good to have choices.
     
  7. JDDavis macrumors 65816

    JDDavis

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    If I was starting out I'd be pretty interested in the mirrorless options offered by Fuji or Sony (still am). Even if you jumped to a DSLR and even to full frame it would still be great to have the compact camera. For the budget a D3200 or D5300 kit would be a great place to start. With the 3200 you could probably get the 18-55, 55-200 kit and add a nice flash or a 35 or 50mm prime for that budget.

    I'd say whatever you end up deciding on leave room in your budget for a decent flash and a decent tripod.
     
  8. Apple fanboy macrumors Core

    Apple fanboy

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    #8
    And memory, bags, filters, cleaning stuff, straps, light stands, cables, backgrounds, software and other stuff!

    Once you start it gets expensive!
     
  9. VI™ macrumors 6502a

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    #9
    Old does not equal out dated and even DSLRs are not old technology. They may have a form factor that dates back decades, but the technology inside can rival mirrorless. There are pros and cons to each system. Better AF and dynamic range between different camera, some mirrorless and some DSLRs. That's why some people can replace several thousands of dollars worth of DSLR equipment for mirrorless but others can't. It depends on the user and their needs and intentions.
     
  10. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

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    As you can see there are lots of varying opinions and advocates for different "solutions" to your original post.

    I'll just toss a few peanuts into the gallery here -

    1) Consider the purchase as investing in two systems: camera bodies and then lenses. Lenses hold value better than camera bodies in case you want to move up to a newer camera later.

    2) DSLR vs mirrorless - with the advances of technology, the line between the two is getting blurred on quality of output between cropped sensor DSLR and mirrorless. At this time, DSLR have some distinct advantages but unless you are shooting high speed subject matter, a mirrorless might suit your needs in a smaller and lighter set up.

    3) Beyond still images and wanting to shoot video - if you want to also shoot video, you need to do your homework to find which camera models do well with video. Many offer video but in truth are rather limited and can prove frustrating with inability to control focus when attempting to zoom, following moving object etc. You will need to decide if video is important to you and which cameras meet your needs.

    4) Software - take some time to learn about software for editing your photos and organizing them. You might start with a few dozen within your first weeks and end up with thousands over the years thus, you need a software to help manage and organize. Typical to the mix were Aperture by Apple and Lightroom by Adobe. Lightroom is a reasonable starting point as Apple is doing away with Aperture. Also there are some good choices including Pixelmator - - - all worth investigation.

    I can't tell you what to get but I do believe the Nikon D3200 is a good starting point. It is designed well enough to get people who are really interested in digital photography a reasonable starting point. Canon and other makers have similar cameras so you do have some choices.

    Last - while as opinionated as we are here, I strongly suggest you look at some photo/photo-gear related sites to get some reviews on equipment and their respective forums for more hands on comments. Just be careful to filter out the fanboi blather and the haters/trolls.
     
  11. MCAsan macrumors 601

    MCAsan

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    #11
    No one mentioned replacing anything existing. This thread is about starting off in photography.

    In February Olympus will introduce their E-M5 Mark II. The multi axis stabilization system will be used to move the sensor the distance of 1/2 pixel and take another shot. This will be done in 4 directions and merged by the CPU to create a 40MP raw file. And that is done from a camera body with a 2x FOV multiplier compared to a 35mm FF body. 2015 will be exciting times indeed.
     
  12. Voodoofreak macrumors regular

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    #12
    How about those Canon T3i series...those seem like entry level DSLRs.
     
  13. Meister Suspended

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    #13
    Get a D3300 with a 50mm 1.8g and a 35mm 1.8g (dx).
    That combo will already produce pro level results on an amazingly low budget.
     
  14. VI™ macrumors 6502a

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    #14
    So then it's better to start out with a more capable camera then. That's not always a mirrorless. And what about people who need wider angles? What's a 2.0 crop going to do for them? Not to mention lens selection for the Olympus is OK if you're looking at AF lenses where as the lens selection for some DSLRs is just amazing. Sure you can use legacy MF lenses, but not everyone can afford to use MF lenses for everything.

    There are pros and cons either way you go. Mirrorless cameras aren't the perfect camera. Neither are DSLRs.
     
  15. Frosteric901 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #15
    thanks for the replies guys this is really helping. but as some of you have mentioned already if i am gonna start photography might as well invest in the proper equipment.
     
  16. JDDavis macrumors 65816

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    Oh, and one more thing :eek:. It won't be "anything serious" for long. With boats the saying goes that the first thing you want to get after buying a boat is a bigger boat. Well, that kinda applies here too. Perhaps there are three species of photographers. Those who want to take nice shots on vacation and family events, those who once they start, will continuously get more serious about their photography and those who are making money doing it. That doesn't mean one group is more talented than the other, it's just how they approach it.

    Obviously that's oversimplified and people get into and continue with photography for many different reasons. When you say starter camera that tells me you're probably in for a long ride, which is great. The key is to get started no matter what kind of camera it is. Enjoy!
     
  17. robgendreau macrumors 68040

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    Good luck with that...NOBODY every agrees about what is the "proper" equipment. :D

    The problem is that cameras are just tools. And they are always about compromise, sorta like cars. With interchangeable lens cameras you can swap out lenses, but then you add tons of gear and complexity. DSLRs have bigger sensors, but more weight. A long telephoto gets you closer, but less light and more jitter. And so it goes. So buying an expensive camera now, when you may not even know what kind of pictures you want to take, is sorta like buying a sports car now, and finding out later what you really wanna do is go offroading.

    I'd say buy something cheap and used. Or maybe a bridge camera. I have a couple of interchangeable lens cameras, but I just bought an SX50 superzoom just to take photos with that huge 1200mm reach, and because it can be more versatile to carry than even my compact M43 camera with a kit lens. It has most all the manual controls of a DSLR, so you can learn all the concepts you need to know. And it only cost $200US refurb'd.
     
  18. Frosteric901 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    #18
    that is actually a very good way to think about it. thanks man. so with that in mind what do you guys think of the Sony Cybershot HX60V Digital Camera
     
  19. Southern Dad macrumors 65816

    Southern Dad

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    #19
    The Sony a58 SLT camera is well within your budget and I believe an excellent choice for a starter to midrange camera.
     
  20. thejadedmonkey macrumors 604

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    #20
    The truth is, (to over generalize) an SLR is used frequently by a "pro" and taken care of, or used infrequently as a hobby. So either way, a used one is in good condition.

    My suggestion is to do some research and look for a mid-range camera from a few years back. Then pick up some used lenses to go with it.

    Depending on how far back you want to go, you could pick up a D40 for under $200, and then have $500 for lenses. That's a full setup for the price of a low end starter set.

    Plus, if you go the used route and end up hating the hobby, you can sell it for the price you paid for it as it won't have depreciated much in the month or two you own it.
     
  21. xMacFeinx macrumors newbie

    xMacFeinx

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    #21
    One DSLR I would highly recommend as a 'starter' body would be the T3i or even T5i. Price wise you're $300-$550 depending on if you go with just the body or kit lens as well.

    I had great experiences shooting the T3i and T5i starting out. One upside is the T5i has a touch screen that makes it convenient to pick settings and wipe through images. The LCD screen quality on the T5i makes a huge difference too.

    If you've got questions on either, please feel free to PM me.
     
  22. Timmeh8604 macrumors member

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    #22
    What about the EOS M SLR? It's a nice compact Canon with the option to use different lenses. You can even get an adapter to use standard rebel lenses as well if you decided to pick up a rebel and just share lenses and choose which camera depending on what you will be doing with it. It's a reasonable price all over the place at the moment and has me considering purchasing one to play around with and learn on.
     
  23. jypfoto macrumors member

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    #23
    The EOS M isn't a SLR. I wouldn't recommend it as a primary camera, only as a secondary camera and probably to those that shoot Canon as a main DSLR. Reason being lack of buttons and everything is touch screen based. It can't track to save it's life, the autofocus is subpar, and the handling leaves a lot to be desired.

    For a primary camera system, the Sony a6000 + 35/50 primes or an Olympus E-M10 is a great start.
     
  24. Southern Dad, Dec 26, 2014
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2014

    Southern Dad macrumors 65816

    Southern Dad

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    #24
    The Sony a58 takes 8 frames per second and is 20 megapixels. Just sayin'. You can buy it for under $400. Because of the translucent mirror technology, the mirror doesn't have to move like in a typical DSLR. It's able to shoot faster and still keep focus.

    I went into a Wolf Camera several years ago, intent on buying the Nikon D40x. The salesman could have made a quick sale of that camera and I'd have been on my way but that wasn't they way he sold cameras. He pulled down the Nikon and three other cameras. He sent me out into the parking lot to shoot a bunch of pictures. I did this with each camera. Then he put them on the screen with the monitor split four ways. We printed a very similar photo from each camera. In the end, I went with the Sony a350. He actually didn't try to sell me on any of the four but let me see what I liked or didn't like about each.

    Whatever camera you pick make sure it has the features that you want. What mount is it? The Sony a58 is an Alpha mount camera. Minolta Maxxum lenses fit it, as well as Sony lenses. The higher megapixel is a huge advantage. There are times you can just shoot the whole scene and later crop what you need for the photograph.

    For Christmas I got my 12-year-old daughter the Sony a58. She's been shooting with an iPhone 5s. The camera is very easy to use.
     

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  25. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

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    What you said seems good on the surface but simply going out and clicking a few shots is akin to going to a store to compare TVs. There is nothing mentioned about settings and for cameras which lens was used which does influence results. However, I am glad you found a camera that works for you. When I tell others to try out the cameras first, I also mention that they should check on ergonomics including feel in the hands, ease of use of "buttons" and wheels as well as the menu system. As for my comment on TVs, people often see the "wow" factor when TVs are set for display purposes and are surprised just how different they look at home under normal settings. The contrast and compare is flawed in most stores. Similar can be said if a "kit" lens for one camera is lower in quality than another camera maker/model. Also not all in camera jpegs are the same and some can actually be better with some minor adjustments. A perfect example is the Fuji X series in camera jpegs are amazing yet, a Nikon D800 with the right lens generating a RAW file will run circles around Fuji's jpegs. There are so many factors to what makes for a good camera per a given enthusiast. Again, just happy to hear you found a camera that you like and can enjoy.
     

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