What is better... (RAM question)

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by Abyssgh0st, Jun 10, 2009.

  1. Abyssgh0st macrumors 68000

    Abyssgh0st

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2009
    Location:
    Norman, OK
    #1
    Okay, I've got two WhiteBooks, a late 2008 and a new 2.13. I'm selling the old one, which has 4GB of 667MHz of Kingston RAM.

    The new WhiteBook has 2GB of 800GHz stock RAM.

    What is better (Faster, more efficient), the 2 sticks of 800GHz? Or 1GB of 800GHz and 2GB of 667MHz?
     
  2. NewMacbookPlz macrumors 68040

    NewMacbookPlz

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    #2
    I wouldn't recommend mixing RAM modules of different speeds.

    Either your system will run at the slower one's speed, reducing performance by ~5%, or you could toast the slower module if you run at the higher speed.
     
  3. Abyssgh0st thread starter macrumors 68000

    Abyssgh0st

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2009
    Location:
    Norman, OK
    #3
    Oh okay, thanks. I guess I'll stick with 2GB then.
     
  4. Bill Gates macrumors 68020

    Bill Gates

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2006
    Location:
    127.0.0.1
    #4
    Any computer with integrated graphics will benefit from higher RAM speed. With how picky these computers tend to be, I doubt it would boot with mismatched modules. With that said, if it does boot, there is no harm to be done except that the memory performance, and subsequently, the graphics performance, will suffer as the memory will run at the lowest common denominator. Meaning, if you have one stick of 667MHz RAM, and one of 800MHz, both modules will run at 667MHz (~17% slower) and with the slower timings of the two modules. You can't "toast" memory modules by running them at the incorrect speed as the previous poster stated, and no damage would be done if it doesn't work, which I doubt it would for the aforementioned reasons.
     
  5. NewMacbookPlz macrumors 68040

    NewMacbookPlz

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    #5
    You can "toast" DIMMs by running them at speeds higher than they're rated for.

    Usually a computer will downclock to the slower speed, but if it didn't, kiss that DIMM goodbye if it's really not made to take faster speeds than it was rated for.
     
  6. Bill Gates macrumors 68020

    Bill Gates

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2006
    Location:
    127.0.0.1
    #6
    Show me proof. I have never heard of anything like this before and don't believe one bit of it.
     
  7. NewMacbookPlz macrumors 68040

    NewMacbookPlz

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    #7
    After some reading around, it appears I was wrong :p

    I was mixing up RAM frequencies with voltage associated with overclocking, my bad :eek::eek:
     

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