What is mean by 'Somebody accepted your request' in FB?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by hajime, Sep 28, 2016.

  1. hajime macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    #1
    Hello, I sent a FB message with question to two girls I met at school. In both cases, I got '(name of person) accepted your request.' What does that mean? They didn't answer my question.
     
  2. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #2
    I think (and that is the verb I am choosing to use, as I am not on FaceBook myself) that it means that they believe - or, are choosing to believe - that you wished for them 'accept' you as a 'friend' on their respective FB accounts.

    However, if you are seeking clarification of anything more detailed that you may have asked - such as specific requests - well, that will probably require more communication.
     
  3. D.T. macrumors 604

    D.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2011
    Location:
    Vilano Beach, FL
    #3
    When you send someone a message, who isn't a friend, they have to accept the message, and you get a notification. They don't necessarily have to type a reply. This is done to prevent unsolicited messages and/or review of the sender, etc.

    This is different than a friend-request / accept.
     
  4. twietee macrumors 603

    twietee

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    #4
    I very recently started with FB too and found that strange too. Was already invited by a "friend" (dude I play football with) into a group and send him later a quick question via FB/messenger and only got the reply "He accepted your request" too with no further answer..

    On a different matter: FB gets on my nerves already. :D
     
  5. D.T. macrumors 604

    D.T.

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2011
    Location:
    Vilano Beach, FL
    #5

    The group invite doesn't connect you to that person, only to the group, so what I explained above is still applicable: non-friends have to proactively accept to messages to prevent unwanted contact, and you simply get a confirmation they accepted the message.

    It's not really any difference than any other communication mechanism where there's some kind of "read receipt". :)
     
  6. twietee macrumors 603

    twietee

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    #6
    Yes, I know. I just wanted to tell the OP that he's not alone out there wondering. :D

    I understand that it's likely just the guy not noticing that I actually asked a specific question (and not necessarily wanted to be "friends" with him) but how can I know? You would also wonder if you shoot someone a question and get nothing back other than a read recipe and additional note that you are now buddies ;)
     
  7. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2008
    Location:
    The Anthropocene
    #7
    Run for the hills!
     
  8. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #8
    Quite a few of our local staff in different countries where I have worked in recent years are Facebook enthusiasts.

    Well, they are often quite young - late twenties to mid/late thirties - and are completely mystified at the fact that I am 'not on FB', that, in fact, I can't stand it, see no reason to join it, and prefer not to use it when keeping in touch with them after our time working together has come to an end.
     
  9. monokakata macrumors 68000

    monokakata

    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Location:
    Hilo, Hawai'i
    #9
    I got on FB 5 or 6 years ago. I go back and forth in terms of how much time I spend there. If I were back living in a good-sized city with many friends, it wouldn't be important to me. But when I moved out into the Pacific, to live again in my childhood home, I found FB very helpful both in keeping in touch with old friends (that damn 6 hour time difference kind of kills spur-of-the-moment telephone conversations to the US east coast) and in making new ones in Hawai'i via affinity groups.

    But the best thing is have dozens of young friends who are the grandchildren of people I was close to on a remote island in the south Pacific. Their grandparents aren't on FB but the kids are, and I have many friends among them. Not long ago, something I could only have dreamed of even a decade ago happened -- one of the kids was in the village, my village, and had connectivity and in real time one of my best old friends and I exchanged photos of each other. It was exciting.
     
  10. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #10
    Yes, those - or similar - arguments have been made to me, but Facebook still leaves me cold. Bitterly and icily cold, if truth be told. I just don't 'get' it, and the zeal of those who extol its myriad virtues not only fails to move me, but strikes me as somewhat unsettling at times.

    Besides, I use email, and am on LinkedIn (which I use solely for professional purposes) and Twitter. And I'm on here, far more frequently than I would ever have envisaged when I joined the forum.
     
  11. AllergyDoc macrumors 65816

    AllergyDoc

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2013
    Location:
    Utah, USA
    #11
    just wait until you get used to it and they change everything. :confused:
     
  12. mbpowner macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2016
    #12
    Thanks for clearing that up ! I myself, was so confused~
     
  13. Badagri macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2012
    Location:
    UK
    #13

    I really don't understand Facebook, well I know mostly how it works. What I do not get is how it appears so many lost people or don't realise they're lost solely depend on it. As well as hearing all these depression stories rising from it with so many women.
     
  14. CMoore515 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2015
    Location:
    Des Moines, IA
    #14
    This.
     
  15. twietee macrumors 603

    twietee

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2012
    #15
    I know what you mean and was myself lukewarm about it for some reason for years and years - just started with it because it was the only way to get a hobbyist football group conveniently organized.

    I use it mostly as some sort of adress book - it's literally the only way to get into touch again with some long "forgotten" friends I was very close with before (no other adresses, e-mail, phone no./ a lot of years have passed) - and it is somewhat extremely beautiful to have a nice chat via that messenger app (the only thing I really use tbh) after all these years. :)

    Not sure if it's because of my friends in particular or that the extreme fb hype has died down since quite some time but I don't see that kind of picture spam of everybodies breakfast/lunch/dinner table I was envisaging before either ;)

    Waht is nice are some recommendations or notes by others I wouldn't have known about otherwise. Now I'm going to Zurich next week because of a brilliant lecture and that will be worth it alone..

    Hahaha, I wouldn't mind a few changes tbh. But I can see that it gets more annoying than pleasing too. :D
     
  16. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Location:
    The Far Horizon
    #16
    Yes, I have been reading about this, and find it profoundly disturbing.

    I suspect that this is because Facebook is primarily envisaged as a visual medium - and women tend to be judged very unforgivingly in such contexts.

    Personally, I don't much care for that sort of world, where your every meal or activity can be photographed, and then, uploaded, with - or worse - without - permission, for the world to see.

    I am very uneasy about a world where hard-won boundaries of privacy are so casually discarded while the very idea of personal space is disputed and effortlessly eroded.

    Moreover, Facebook and its ilk and wider world have opened up and enabled the whole idea of vile stuff such as 'revenge porn'. This something I find utterly loathsome and repellant, and not just as a profound breach of personal boundaries. But the sense of entitlement of those who carry out such actions, demonstrating a grotesquely disrespectful - as it is intended to be - breach of boundaries, decorum and privacy in such a horribly intimate way, is something I am deeply uncomfortable with.

    Indeed, the very idea that such an area of life - the deeply intimate and private and personal space - should be considered something to be 'consumed' and judged by others online is something that I find abhorrent.

    And I think that Facebook (and its ilk) seek to erode personal and private spaces, and make the stuff of private lives something for public consumption.

    Mind you, I have never understood this mad desire to 'share' stuff; or, to judge yourself by how many 'friends' you have, a ghastly form of validation that seems targeted directly at insecure teenaged girls.

    Fair comment, but I think I shall still give it a very wide berth.
     

Share This Page