What is RAW workflow like?

Discussion in 'Digital Video' started by matteusclement, Nov 15, 2013.

  1. matteusclement macrumors 65816

    matteusclement

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    victoria
    #1
    I have been watching RAW from a distance with the 5dii.
    From what I can tell, it's a clunky and awkward process with "images" rather than video.

    Is it the same deal with RED's and their raw?
    Or is it actual video?

    What's the best way to edit RAW right now on MAC or PC?
     
  2. nateo200 macrumors 68030

    nateo200

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2009
    Location:
    Northern District NY
    #2
    I don't do RAW video really but I do know the workflow with RED well and with the Canon DSLR's it is somewhat clunky. Basically you have to convert the raw data from the DSLR to .DNG's in an image sequence (a string of still images) then you have to throw those images in software that will create a video from it and set it to 24fps or whichever frame rate you recorded at, then you can convert to a format thats "normal" like 10-bit uncompressed 4:2:2 or better yet ProRes 4444, etc. Its not TOO clunky but its not like pulling video off an SD card and then getting right to editing...BUT it offers an advantage in color space and dynamic range that is definitely worth it when you need it.
     
  3. matteusclement thread starter macrumors 65816

    matteusclement

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2008
    Location:
    victoria
    #3
    Thanks NATE,

    I thought it was something like that.
    Is there an automated process for the first part of pulling the data, converting it, then turning it into video?

    i'd image that adobe or someone will be getting on this pretty fast.

    at the moment, it sounds like a bit of a PITA
     
  4. nateo200, Nov 15, 2013
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2013

    nateo200 macrumors 68030

    nateo200

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2009
    Location:
    Northern District NY
    #4
    Honestly if I said anymore it would be pure speculation as I've only done it once or twice and it wasn't exactly a perfect workflow BUT I believe Magic Lantern have a plugin for Adobe Premiere/After Effects on the way, either way Magic Lantern have made a small program that runs on OS X and Windows that will batch convert to the DNG image sequence, what I do with an image sequence is I Just throw it in FCP X and set each image to one frame in a 24p timeline (or 25p or 30p depending on what you shot it as) then with each picture set as one frame it will play smoothly at its proper frame rate, then I export it as ProRes 4444 since that format supports 12-bit and 4:4:4 and is easy on file size and bandwidth. Once thats done you can bring that ProRes file back into your NLE and edit it like any other video file. Just note you won't get audio so if you NEED audio get an external recorder...I use a Zoom H1 but I haven't used audio in my RAW tests so far but I imagine with some work you could sync it pretty easy. It is a PITA BUT as slow as it is you'll eventually get some great quality video, we are talking 12bit+ 4:4:4 uncompressed vs the cameras H.264 which is only heavily compressed 8bit 4:2:0. Even the jump to 10-bit is substantial as 8-bit only has 256 different color options at max (usually closer to 220) while 10-bit offers 1024~ different color levels and 12-bit offers 4096~different color levels...ever notice banding between gradients of color or lighting? Thats 8-bit show its ugly head! With more color options you get smoother color transitions, better ability to color grade and just more opportunity to make the image better.

    Problem is the data rates, first you'll need a very fast SD card that supports 95MB/s+ (notice capital MB's as in MegaBYTES not Mb (megabits), I use Sandisk Extreme Pro's, I have a 32GB Micro SD that clocks 100MB/s write speed even though its only rated for 80 or 90MB/s forgot which and then I have a regular size Sandisk Extreme Pro that supports 95MB/s and I get about 100MB/s write on that as well, they are VERY expensive however, off the top of my head in USD its about 30-40 more for the Extreme Pro's (Extreme's only support 45MB/s max or 30 on smaller ones) to overcome this I originally just grabbed an 8GB and 4GB extreme pro since if I was to be shooting RAW I would likely have my rMBP to dump the footage on right away. The bigger problem is Canon DSLR's can't write more than 40-50MB/s so it buffers out pretty fast which means full 1080p24 can only go for like 15seconds on some cameras, 5D Mk.II is a little better but the real winner for RAW is the 5D Mk.III which can do full 1080p24 or 30p for extended periods...I think with my Canon 550D I could get 960x540p24 without it buffering out, which yeah its not full HD but 12-bit 4:4:4 scales to HD much better than compressed H.264...either way its definitely worth getting your feet wet in...I haven't been playing with it in a while since I've had a few video jobs that I needed to finish and a couple of photo gigs so I didn't have time to be playing with my only camera but definitely give it a shot!

    EDIT: (Sorry for the spelling and what not, I usually make my posts late and its 2:30AM here in the States!)
     

Share This Page