What is real-life Wireless N speed?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by techmonkey, May 16, 2008.

  1. techmonkey macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2007
    #1
    I just purchased a wireless N router. My previous router was a Netgear G router, and I did some test over wireless for transfer speed

    Old Netgear G router
    1.09 GB file - 650 seconds to transfer from my PC to my Mac = 13.7 Mb/sec

    New Linksys N router
    1.09 GB file - 238 seconds to transfer from my PC to my Mac = 37.5 Mb/sec

    Wireless N is claimed to be up to 130Mb/sec. What is the real life speeds? It seems like I should be getting more than just 37.5 Mb/sec.
     
  2. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Location:
    In the velcro closure of America's Hat
    #2
    I can get over 100mbps between my MacBook and iMac (if one is connected via gigabit ether) via my AEBS in 300mbps 5Ghz mode but everything has to be just right. Usually I get about 80mbps.
     
  3. techmonkey thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2007
    #3
    Im looking at this Linksys router config, and the only options are Standard 20MHz or Wide 40MHz.

    Do you think its something to do with my Windows -> Mac connection that is causing the slowdown? I dont have another Mac to test Mac->Mac.
     
  4. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Location:
    In the velcro closure of America's Hat
    #4
    Probably router specific. The speeds you are getting look reasonable for the mode you are in. Is it an b/g compatible mode?
     
  5. donmei macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2007
    #5
    guys, just a couple of thoughts.

    1) wireless b/a/g/n are a wireless version of SHARED (as opposed to switched) ethernet
    2) shared ethernet maxes out somewhere around 40% so your speeds seem reasonable

    Another thing to keep in mind (though you seem to have gotten it right) is the difference between mb/s and mB/s

    b= bit
    B=Byte
    8 bits= 1 byte

    so 100 mb/s =12.5 mB/s

    Its particularly confusing because download speeds are displayed in bytes. The OP, based on order of magnitude made the conversion, but just thought I'd point this out.

    Don
     
  6. techmonkey thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2007
    #6
    Yep, Im very aware of the differences in terminology :)

    I did some test with the setting on the router set "Wireless N only" and also "Mixed mode". Mixed mode was only about 1.7 Mb/sec slower.

    I still feel 39 Mb/sec is disappointing. I just have to decide if its worth the $90 I spent on the router.
     
  7. techgineer macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2011
    #7
    Keeping units straight

    Just FYI:

    M = mega
    m = milli
    B = byte
    b = bit

    So if you want to communicate clearest, say "37.5MB" for 37.5 mega bytes.

    37.5mB means 37.5 milliBytes or 0.0375 bytes. Yeah, obviously that's not what anyone would say, but it's not a big deal to keep units clear when posting.

    37.5Mb means 37.5 mega bits. Sure, people might be able to infer that from the context, but again, there's no good reason to make them do that. And in this case, it often gets quite confusing, since both bit and byte units are used to define transfer speeds.
     
  8. jtara macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2009
    #8
    The problem with talking about Wireless-N speed is that there are so many wireless Ns!

    Depends on what band, MIMO, etc.

    You'll get the best N performance with 5gHz in the same room. You should get 100-200mbit/sec, depending on your hardware.

    Performance at 5gHz drops off RAPIDLY when going through walls. One room max, and it's still going to drop to maybe 20mbit/sec.

    2.4gHz gives better performance at a distance and through walls, but has much more interference and not as much bandwidth. You won't hit the same rate in the same room as 5gHz. And if somebody's microwaving popcorn forgidaboutit. So, you'll probably still get only 20mbit/sec going through a wall. But you might go through two walls.
     

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