iPhone X What is the best way to brighten low light photos on iPhone X?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Hieveryone, Dec 3, 2018.

  1. Hieveryone macrumors 68040

    Hieveryone

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  2. Azathoth123 macrumors 6502

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    #2
    Adobe Lightroom Mobile will work and it’s free. You can use the exposure slider for global changes, or the appropriate slider for just highlights/shadows/whites/blacks. A CC subscription will unlock additional features (mostly unrelated to your topic) if you’re in the Adobe ecosystem. It also has quite a good RAW camera built into the free version.
     
  3. BugeyeSTI macrumors 68030

    BugeyeSTI

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  4. Hieveryone thread starter macrumors 68040

    Hieveryone

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  5. fred98tj macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    Do you mean after you took the photo ?
    You can always just use the photo viewer itself. It has a built in editor.
    Also if you want to adjust the exposure as you actually take the photo, you can do that with the native photo app. Simply tap to focus on something then if you touch the screen along side the focus box and slide your finger up and down you’ll see you can adjust the exposure.
     
  6. Hieveryone thread starter macrumors 68040

    Hieveryone

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    #6
    After the photo.

    Everything I’ve tried changes the photo too much and it doesn’t look as nice. In fact it’d be nice if I could just adjust parts of the photo like the background which is dark.
     
  7. uniquexoxo macrumors regular

    uniquexoxo

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    #7
    You can use Adobe Lightroom or Snapseed, it has a Selective Tool. You can brush the part you want to adjust to select it and then make the changes. These are the best app you can use as they keep the quality of the photo to the maximum.
     
  8. Azathoth123 macrumors 6502

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    #8
    Almost any decent photo editor should work provided there’s detail in the shadows to be brought out. If the shadows are ‘blocked’ ie no detail at all, nothing will help. In general it’s better to overexpose a bit with digital imaging when taking the shot.
     
  9. Hieveryone thread starter macrumors 68040

    Hieveryone

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    #9

    Yes I’m trying to just do the background. That’s all.

    I need to figure out though how to use the apps. I’m not familiar at all on the terminology or how to do anything really.

    I will be trying to figure it out.
     
  10. Hieveryone thread starter macrumors 68040

    Hieveryone

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    #11
    How do you do just the background
     
  11. Newtons Apple macrumors Core

    Newtons Apple

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    #12
    If the image was really underexposed, no amount of magic will turn it into a decent image.
     
  12. Hieveryone thread starter macrumors 68040

    Hieveryone

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    #13
    Can u please tell me what underexposed means?
     
  13. Newtons Apple macrumors Core

    Newtons Apple

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    #14
    Underexposed is when the images or parts of the image was not illuminated sufficiently to record data on the camera sensor. You can use these apps to “pull” some detail out of some of the dark areas but the results will not be pleasing.
    --- Post Merged, Dec 4, 2018 ---
    It would require “masking” the subject and applying shadow reduction to the background only.
     
  14. Hieveryone thread starter macrumors 68040

    Hieveryone

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    #15
    I get it. Yeah I would say it’s underexposed. Like most of it looks good but it was a dark background and I want to illuminate it. When I use the seed app it illuminates the background great but it does look super grainy. Still not too bad. But the problem is the part that’s fine gets illuminated and it’s like why!?!? so I want to just leave the good part alone and fix just the bad.

    The second post was like French to me. I am photography illiterate sadly.
     
  15. Newtons Apple macrumors Core

    Newtons Apple

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    #16
    Not sure about the app but you have to “mask” the correctly exposed subject and only apply the illumination to the background. This image is most likely a image that used a flash or some type of illumination that was not strong enough to illuminate the background.

    Does the app you are using have a shadow recovery function? If so it will only illuminate the shadows which you should be able to adjust the effect with a “slider” in the app.
     
  16. Azathoth123 macrumors 6502

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    #17
    Having grain (noise) in underexposed areas is a property of all sensors and small sensors are worse than large ones. This is an issue that all phone makers that are serious about cameras are working on, but it is a physical limitation of sensor size. In the XS phone, the larger sensor with larger ‘pixels’ helps - I just got mine a few days ago so I cannot tell you how much better than the X it is, but I would suspect that it is not worth an upgrade. A full frame DSLR will be better of course, and the difference between a FF and small sensors like micro 4/3 or APS-C is noticeable in low-light situations.

    Enabling HDR/Smart HDR in settings will help. Here’s an article by the Halide app folks, scroll down to the second set of images of the guitaurist near the end of the article and you can see the effect of HDR on grain in a low-light situation.

    https://blog.halide.cam/iphone-xs-why-its-a-whole-new-camera-ddf9780d714c

    After the fact there’s only so much that you can do. The full version of desktop Photoshop has a grain reduction filter, but it’s limited in what it can do, the problem is that there wasn’t enough ‘signal’ from those dim areas to begin with.

    Another offbeat idea might be to convert the image to black and white, people kind of expect to see grain (and like it BTW) and it won’t have color to the grain of course. Hope this helps a little.
     

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16 December 3, 2018