What is the default root password for OSx?

Discussion in 'macOS' started by cafe99, Mar 6, 2007.

  1. cafe99 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2007
    #1
    Hi,

    I have a problem, I need to install a program call zimbra and the software ask me to login as root.

    I can't remember that I have enter or change password for this super user root account.

    Anyone can point me to the right direction?

    Many thanks!:)

    Choong Leng
     
  2. BigPrince macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2006
    #2
    By default ROOT is not activated. You must go to your utilities folder and go to net info manager and activate the ROOT account.

    Once in net info manager go to:

    1. Security
    2. Authenticate
    3. Security
    4. Enable Root User
    5. Follow prompts

    Good luck, though playing with root is risky and make sure you are 100% sure this is required.
     
  3. HawaiiMacAddict macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2006
    Location:
    On one of my Macs of course
    #3
    As long as we're talking root access, here's another question. I normally use a Standard User account, probably because I'm still a little bit skittish - I'm a recent switcher :D - and I noticed something strange. If I'm in my Standard User account and have to use the terminal and use the 'sudo' command, i get a prompt for a password. When I enter the Administrator account password, the prompt indicates that I entered the wrong password. When I log into the Administrator account, however, I can use the 'sudo' command with no problems. Why is that?

    HawaiiMacAddict
     
  4. Westside guy macrumors 603

    Westside guy

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2003
    Location:
    The soggy side of the Pacific NW
    #4
    By default only admins are in the sudoers file - however if you're reasonably Unix-savvy, you can add your non-admin account in as well (and it will stay there).
     
  5. emptyCup macrumors 65816

    emptyCup

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    #5
    From a technical point of view Westside answered your question. However, since you are "a little skittish", you should accept the extra security of having to log into a separate administrator account. Otherwise you might as well have the convenience of working as an administrator all the time.
     
  6. hzm1016 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2018
    #6
    Actually, I see some confusion here due to several misunderstandings: (1) HawaiiMacAddict is using the Admin (root) password instead of his own user password; sudo wants the USER's password for authentication. (2) Westside guy's reply refers to the sudoers file, but the result is different if the user is not in sudoers: if the user enters the correct (his own) password, but that user is not in the sudoers file, the response is a refusal due to not being in the file -- not a complaint about an incorrect password. (3) The root user can always invoke sudo without a password challenge (presumably, so that scripts that include sudo invocations will work for root without delaying for the password -- root already has root privileges). (4) Finally, note that the sudo command "remembers" for a short time (a few minutes) after a user has successfully authenticated and does not challenge on subsequent sudo invocations during that interval (but only in the same shell session; a sudo command in another window will get challenged for the password).

    Why does sudo want the USER's password? At least two reasons: (1) so that no user needs the root password, and (2) users can individually be granted a specific set of commands that can be invoked via sudo.
     

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