What kind of knot do I need to make?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by lord patton, May 24, 2009.

  1. lord patton macrumors 65816

    lord patton

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Location:
    Chicago
    #1
    Hi all,

    I just got my hammock out from the garage it's broken! Something must have gnawed through the rope. It's especially a pisser because my last hammock broke because I left it out all winter. I can't win! :mad:

    Anyway, I don't think this is a total loss, though. Except for the place where the rope was chewed, the hammock is in great shape. I think that if I knew how to tie the appropriate knot, I could make this hammock mostly usable.

    Do we have any former Boy Scouts here? Or any other—more tolerant—people who also know how to tie knots :p Pictures are below so you can see what I'm up against. I can probably google instruction if you just give me the name of the knot.

    Thanks MR! Happy Decoration Day, y'all.
     

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  2. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
    #2
    I used to rock climb and rappel a lot so i know a few good knots, but I can't really tell from your pics exactly how to advise you. It appears the three severed ropes go through the stabilizer bar, but where do they connect after that? Do they go into the sling part of the hammock where you recline or do they extend to the part where you secure the hammock for hanging? Not trying to be picky, but it could make a difference as to what type of knot is best.
     
  3. lord patton thread starter macrumors 65816

    lord patton

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Location:
    Chicago
    #3
    the part where you secure the hammock for hanging.

    I could get extra rope and tie the broken strings back how they originally were. I would need to tie each new length twice—once near the stabilizer bar (as pictured) and again neer the place I hang it.

    There's enough pe on either side to work with. I just don't know what knot is secure enough, and how to make sure its (nearly) the right length.
     
  4. lord patton thread starter macrumors 65816

    lord patton

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Location:
    Chicago
    #4
    I may have spoken too soon about there being enough length to tie. On the side where there are three broken cords, only one left a length at the other end. (shown in the first pic below)

    On the other side of the hammock (again between the stabilizer and the mounting point) there are two broken cords, and there is a short length for each of them at the mounting point (2nd and 3rd pic below).
     

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  5. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
    #5
    You may have just enough rope to do a square knot. It's a pretty simple knot that is often used to connect separate ropes in a secure way where they lock down against each other. After the square knot you can use a half hitch with the rest of your slack. If you do not have enough rope at each end then just use what you have at the stabilizer bar side, which seems to be a good amount and secure to the ring or whatever is there to connect all of the separate strands for mounting. This link should help.
     
  6. lord patton thread starter macrumors 65816

    lord patton

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Location:
    Chicago
    #6
    you're the man! I'll post pics when I get it fixed. Thanks!
     
  7. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
    #7
    No problem. Hope you can get it to work. I have some fond memories of camping out with family and there was always a hammock at the campsite for lounging around. One of my dad's favorite memories is from when I was about 10 years old. I got in an argument with him about how to tie up the hammock, you know, thinking I knew everything at that age. Well, he let me have my way with a wise smile and the whole family got a laugh a few hours later when my knot didn't hold and I landed flat on my back. He believed in letting experience be my teacher and he was right. :)
     
  8. lord patton thread starter macrumors 65816

    lord patton

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Location:
    Chicago
    #8
    Well I got it done! I didn't use the square knot though... based on the link you gave, it looked like a sheet bend would be best for tying the new length to the old, and I used a bowline to tie the new length to the... what you call it... the ring to which all the lines attach.

    I hope it will hold. I'll probably use it twice this season, but it will be worth it.

    Thanks again!
     

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  9. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
    #9
    Good choices, especially the bowline. That's a super knot and is actually what I use to tie off my rappelling ropes at the top of a cliff. Glad it worked out well and I hope you enjoy a lazy summer swinging in the breeze. :D
     
  10. Mr. Appleseed macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 28, 2009
    #10
    Got here too late!

    Friend,
    It seems I got to your question too late! Glad you solved it though. I'm an Eagle Scout, and was thinking as I read your problem that a sheet bend and bowline were your best options.

    So you know for the future, and I'm sure your helper already knew this: a square knot is best for tying two ropes together that are equal in width. In this case, the square knot could have worked, but you didn't have enough rope. If the ropes are different sizes, the square not will slip, and the knot will be useless.
    That's where the sheet bend comes in handy. Great knot, works like a square knot but never slips.

    The bowline also will not slip. In fact, it is said that your rope will break before that knot fails (if tied correctly). Very cool.
    Glad it worked out for you!!!
     
  11. Mr. Appleseed macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 28, 2009
    #11
    I forgot the reason for the last post!

    Oh yeah! I wanted to add a cool trick to your foray.

    I noticed that your rope was frayed. This will become a problem over time if you don't correct it, and could cause you more hassle if your knots ever fails. Here's a cool trick.

    If the rope is made of any type of plastic, take a lighter to the frayed part, and it will melt into the rest of the rope, essentially "cauterizing" the wounded rope. Sounds silly, but works great. This is called "fusing".

    If however, the rope is made of cotton, fusing will not work and the rope will burn. This is where you can learn about "whipping" the end of the rope, which is where you tie off the frayed part with really small string, sort of lashing the end of it.

    When you do either of these two things, it will make the overall appearance of your hammock look nicer, sort of a "finishing touch" to something that's supposed to be as nice to look at as it is to lay on. Hope I was helpful!
     
  12. lord patton thread starter macrumors 65816

    lord patton

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Location:
    Chicago
    #12
    great suggestions! I was refraining from "finishing" the ends, because if the knots did fail (in the short term) I wanted the extra length to try again. (This is the same reason I always wait awhile—30 minutes or so—before cutting of the ends of my guitar strings). I'll whip those frayed ends soon.
     

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