What kind of processors iMac has? [For Assembly Language use]

Discussion in 'Mac Programming' started by naughty.coder, Nov 24, 2013.

  1. naughty.coder macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2013
    #1
    I'm currently taking a class on Assembly Language, we are using IA-32 Intel architecture, and we use AT&T syntax.. I've searched a lot in google trying to find if its proper to apply that on my iMac [late 2012] ..
    Or if there is any IDEs for assembly language.

    Also, is using a virtualization app [like parallels] with windows makes any difference?
     
  2. lee1210 macrumors 68040

    lee1210

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    #2
    For the last 7 years the iMac has has an x86 or x86_64 processor. You didn't mention the vintage of yours.

    If the class is being taught based on a windows or Linux environment, i would virtualize. It may not be strictly necessary, but it will be much easier for you to use what peers and the instructor use.

    -Lee
     
  3. naughty.coder thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jul 13, 2013
    #3
    Its 2012, I mentioned it =) ..
    But when I virtualize , is in not it still the same processor or the OS utilize it differently?
     
  4. lee1210 macrumors 68040

    lee1210

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    #4
    Ah, there it is. (The year)

    An emulator will emulate a different processor architecture in software. VirtualPC on PowerPC macs emulated an x86 to run "PC" software. Parallels is virtualization software, so it stands up a VM but uses the same processor architecture (and now, mostly using special virtualization support on processors).

    It's not a matter of the chip. I recommend the same software environment as your peers so you're not on your own with setup, syntax, tools, etc.

    -Lee
     
  5. naughty.coder thread starter macrumors newbie

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    Jul 13, 2013
  6. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #6
    There are many terms for the same thing is-32 and x86 are about the same meaning. For your purpose you just need a mainstream Intel CPU.

    "IDE" and "assembly language" don't normally appear in the same sentence. Not that they can't be used together. But most people mess with assembly will simply work inside a terminal emulator. I'm gone "soft" and now will keep a GUI text editor open and also a command line terminal window. IDEs are fine too

    The problem is not if there are any IDE's you might use but that there are so many and you will have the choose
    If this is for a class, use whatever the instructor uses.
     

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