What makes Android phones unique?

Discussion in 'Alternatives to iOS and iOS Devices' started by Bl0ckHe1d, Aug 2, 2014.

  1. Bl0ckHe1d macrumors 6502

    Bl0ckHe1d

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2009
    Location:
    Caledonia
    #1
    Other than the outer shell of an android phone (i.e. waterproofing / cameras / size / etc), what makes an android phone unique?

    Having looked (very briefly in the shops) at the HTC M8 / LG G3 / Sony I could not differentiate much differences between them. I have assumed that these phones are similar to any Window based PC but with a different badge!

    Can anyone please explain?
     
  2. mrex macrumors 68030

    mrex

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2014
    Location:
    europe
    #2
    Unigue?
    1. If you want to customize them ("getting them to look as you want to"), you can do that. If you dont, you dont need to. It is your choice.

    2. Usually working fine in crossplatform. No problem with BT, because Android doesnt use any specific "android protocol". Meaning that a connectivity via BT isnt a problem generally.

    3. Getting a new gadget and many times multiple choices.

    If you want to have more a windows based phone, maybe WindowsPhone will be better choice?
     
  3. Shuri macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    #3
    The M8 uses a so called Ultrapixel Camera Sensor (Rear) which uses a larger amount (relatively) of area for each pixel, so each one can get more light into it, making better pictures. At least that is what they claim, in my opinion these are just ok looking not very high resolution pictures. It's ok to use "only" 4 MP in normal size, but the problem is, that if you zoom in, one can see the difference very fast compared to a 8 MP Picture.

    The LG uses a innovative set of features, which include gently knocking twice on the screen to unlock it. (pretty cool, if you ask me)

    Generally speaking most of High End Android Phones have their own unique little features setting it apart from other phones, but it usually isn't something major. this isn't isolated to Android phones, but to all smartphones these days.

    Some say it's because there isn't much left to innovate, but I think it actually comes down to simple economics: The market is mostly saturated, which leads companies to lower their R&D effort, so they can keep a higher margin.
     
  4. ozaz macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Location:
    UK
    #4
    It's not quite like that. For example Windows PC OEMs presumably can't change the interface for Windows control panel, but Android OEMs can change the interface for Android settings (and they do!)

    This article might help: http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2013/07/the-great-ars-android-interface-shootout/
     

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