What month are new iPhones finished and ready for manufacturing ?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by Darthdingo, Mar 2, 2011.

  1. Darthdingo, Mar 2, 2011
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2011

    Darthdingo macrumors 6502a

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    Dec 11, 2010
    #1
    Just curious, since all new iPhones have come out in June. At what month does Steve Jobs and Apple officially say the newest version is complete and ready ?

    If they go on sale to the public at the end of June, going backwards from there you have the shipping time ? Several million new iPhone's coming from Foxconn factory in China must take what, a few weeks to get distributed across the world to the Apple stores ? So that puts us beginning of June ? Then going backwards from shipping, how long to actually produce and manufacture these all new designed iPhone's in the factory ? A month to produce the first batch of next gen phones for first week of world wide sales ? Or less than a month for that production ? That would still put at around mid to early May ?

    My question is, when does Mr. Jobs finally say, ok that's it, she is ready, this is our new iPhone, and is final and ready to go. I am guessing that is in late April or early May. After that, it is set in stone and can not be altered or changed any longer.
     
  2. saving107 macrumors 603

    saving107

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Location:
    San Jose, Ca
    #2
    Hopefully a high level executive inside of Apple who wants to get fired soon can answer this question for you here on this forum,

    I await their response.

    Better yet, have you tried emailing Steve Jobs directly and asking him when he will finalize the design for the next version of the iPhone and send it for manufacturing?

    sjobs@apple.com
     
  3. Darthdingo thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    Dec 11, 2010
    #3
    This is a forum, where we have fun speculating about Apple related products. I am just curious. Don't need top secret to the minute detailed info.
     
  4. JulianL macrumors 65816

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    Feb 2, 2010
    Location:
    London, UK
    #4
    I think that it's an interesting question. I've wondered the same myself. I did do project management for high volume technology but that was 25 years ago so I can't remember the timescales I was working with and, even if I could, I doubt it would necessarily be valid with 25 years of progress in manufacturing technology since then.

    Hopefully someone with more recent experience in developing and manufacturing high volume technology products might be able to offer some educated guesses.

    When was that iPhone 4 prototype found in the bar? That gives one datapoint.

    - Julian
     
  5. AndrewR23 macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2010
    #5
    steve jobs wont reply to me about a tiny gap on my iphone4, can stick a corner of a paper in it and its like 3 CM long. !!
     
  6. Darthdingo thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    Dec 11, 2010
    #6
    Thank you Julian. I was just curious is all. Just wondering at what point is the latest design for the iPhone complete, and wrapped up sent off to start production. Would guess that has to be by early May ?

    So the iPhone5 is nearly close to being final and complete, less than two months ?
     
  7. Darthdingo thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    Dec 11, 2010
    #7
    So will the iPhone-next, share a lot of common parts found in the new iPad-Two ?
     
  8. grantsdale macrumors 6502a

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    May 11, 2008
    #8
    Yes, it will most likely carry the same CPU. Other than that, there isn't much thats in the iPad 2 that the iPhone 5 needs and the iPhone doesn't already have. It will most likely carry a dual GSM/CDMA chipset.

    iOS 5 should be the big deal this time around, as the hardware doesn't really need that much of a bump to stay competitive.
     
  9. JulianL macrumors 65816

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    Feb 2, 2010
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    London, UK
    #9
    Agreed, but on the hardware side I hope that removing the need for big innovations means that they've been able to give a lot of attention to fine tuning and incrementally improving what they already had with the iPhone 4 and now have from the iPad 2. Even just a few cubic millimeters and a few grams saved here and there, and a lower component count on the PCB by increasing the integration, might give them the opportunity to find extra space inside the case for the battery to expand and boost battery life even more. And maybe the second generation retina panel can shave a few mW off the power consumption as well.

    Apple really jumped ahead with the iPhone 4 as far as screen technology is concerned, and the A5 just announced for the iPad 2 seems to be easily good enough to keep them competitive in raw performance, so wrong-footing the competition with industry-busting battery life for the iPhone 5 would be a pretty good thing to aim for if they can do it. 30% better battery life than any other smartphone would be a pretty nice claim to add to their marketing arsenal.

    (OK, my opinion is somewhat distorted by my obsession with battery life.)

    - Julian
     
  10. eternlgladiator macrumors 68000

    eternlgladiator

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    Jun 20, 2010
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    Twin Cities
    #10
    I don't work for a high end tech company like apple but we do design and build high end power tools for a ton of different retailers and national brands. Our full lead time is about 18 months from the customer saying the want something to it sitting on their receiving dock. I'm sure apple has ways to reduce this process, plus you have to remember they're not working from scratch, they're really taking the innovation from the original iphone, 3g, 3gs, and 4, then updating the tech, and reskinning it with a new internal layout. I'd say their lead time is something like 8 -10 months. You have to remember that billions of dollars can buy anything including time. Also take into account that the type of parts used can dramatically effect the lead time. It probably took longer to develop the manufacturing process for the antenna band on the iphone 4 than it did to develop the process for injection molding the plastic back for the iphone 3g and 3gs.
     
  11. Darthdingo thread starter macrumors 6502a

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    Dec 11, 2010
    #11
    I would think the case makers need to know the new iPhone5 size and form factor before it's actual release, obviously, so they have time to produce these brand new cases for the new phone and have them on store shelf's the day of release.

    So a leak could easily slip from one of the case makers.
     
  12. eternlgladiator macrumors 68000

    eternlgladiator

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    Twin Cities
    #12
    yes and no. the cases are generally very easy to make and apple usually makes some sort or proprietary case or whatever i.e. the bumper. That way it's still ok to share some data but all their sending are some generic schematics of the phone. While I'll admit that gives away the form factor it really tells very little about the phone since the most important parts are inside. A case manufacturer can operate on rumors that we get and get things going in the right direction then when they the plans "at the last minute" they make final adjustments and send it off to manufacturing. Make sense?
     
  13. URFloorMatt macrumors 6502

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    Jul 4, 2010
    Location:
    Washington, D.C.
    #13
    I'm shooting in the dark here, but I'd guess May 1. Not sure how much the iOS has to be finalized (in theory, not at all, I suppose), but certainly they do at least four solid weeks of manufacturing before they start shipping, and they need probably ten days to cover shipping to retail.

    My guess is the real date is based upon how many units the manufacturer can produce in a month, with some time built in for errors/delays.
     
  14. S1njin macrumors 6502a

    S1njin

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    May 3, 2010
    Location:
    NJ
    #14
    Case manufacturers get nothing in advance. Some take bets on the design due to photo leaks. Some succeed, others fail (Speck Candyshell comes to mind - many returns due to camera flash issues through the case. The company ended up modifying the case post-launch).

    When I spoke w/ Otterbox in June of last year, the guy on the phone told me they had to stand in line w/ everyone else to get their iPhone 4. As soon as they unboxed it, they started fine tuning their case designs to send off to manufacture. The Defender case was not available at lanuch but shortly after, the Commuter case took months.
     
  15. cpucrash0 macrumors regular

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    May 25, 2010
    Location:
    Texas
    #15
    I hope in the new iPhone we get a hd facetime camera like the new macbooks. Maybe that will be a feature?
     

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