What program could I try in stores the 10th?

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by MrNick95, Apr 1, 2015.

  1. MrNick95 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2015
    #1
    I really like this computer, but I'm not too sure if it suits my need. I'm a software student that has an iMac as my primary machine. Even thought I do have a primary powerful machine, I still would like to run programs like CAD, XCodes...

    The thing is that I really want to buy it on the first day it comes out....is there any type of website that would test to see how powerful the computer is?? Or is the something "quick" I could download in stores to test the Mac before I buy it?
     
  2. fisherking macrumors 601

    fisherking

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2010
    Location:
    ny somewhere
    #2
    see if logic X is installed on it (it is on the macbook pros in the apple stores)...
    and there's a demo song included.

    run it, edit...something or other, see how it goes (there's a cpu meter in the logic window, or open activity monitor...).
     
  3. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    Location:
    Enjoying Better Things
    #3
    Take a drive with the applications you plan to use, it`s the safest bet.

    Q-6
     
  4. Hankster macrumors 68020

    Hankster

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2008
    Location:
    Washington DC
    #4
    How many people have a USB-C drive? Plus, do Apple stores really allow the public to install software on their machines? I'm guessing no.
     
  5. Steve121178 macrumors 68040

    Steve121178

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Location:
    Bedfordshire, UK
    #5
    On a 12" screen?
     
  6. Queen6 macrumors 603

    Queen6

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2008
    Location:
    Enjoying Better Things
    #6
    Wireless drives are not uncommon, and if you up for $1300 - $1600 for the Notebook, I am fairly certain you can live with the $15 adaptor, it`s not like it will go to waste. Personally I have a wireless drive and Airdrop is another possibility.

    As for the staff it depends on the individual, if they ask I just tell them straight. In the past they have always been great. I use proprietary engineering software, if I attract attention I just show them openly what I am doing. At the end of the day I am not "ripping off" OS X bundles, I am a long term customer with a specific need, I want to ensure full compatibility and adequate performance.

    Obviously the staff can be uneasy, equally once they understand that you know what your talking about they are ok, best case scenario for them is your booting off an external drive. At the end of the day they are there to help you, and it does them no good for customer to purchase the wrong hardware for their needs.

    Q-6
     
  7. MRrainer macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2008
    Location:
    Zurich, Switzerland
    #7
    I would really like to see how fast (or slow) VMware Fusion works, together with a basic VM of FreeBSD or CentOS (no GUI needed).
    All the computationally intensive tasks like building packages is usually farmed out to physical machines.
    The one thing we run in VMs at work (Zimbra) is too heavy for any notebook, anyway.
    I'd need a maxed out MacPro to run our test environment locally ;-)
     
  8. bjet767 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2010
    #8
    I use VM Fusion and I would place money the Apple store will never let one load it on their demo machines.
     
  9. shenan1982 macrumors 68040

    shenan1982

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2011
    #9
    I remember back in the early days of intel processors they used to install Windows via Boot Camp, Parallels, and VMware to try and sway switchers with demos. I haven't seen any of those in ages. I agree, it's not really smart marketing. That was before the days of iPad and iPhone. I think the ecosystem now sells itself, and people have come to know they're able to use windows on a mac if they want.
     

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