What to do with my iMac

Discussion in 'iMac' started by pja786, May 10, 2011.

  1. pja786 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 10, 2011
    #1
    Hi all,

    I have an older iMac G5, which I bought in 2007 and I'm looking to hear some input as to what I could do with it. This is the model: http://img.engadget.com/common/image...44059818361253

    It's an older model, so it's not compatible with the newer operating systems such as Snow Leopard. I've thought about selling it for parts, but I'd rather keep it and turn it into something more useful then what it is now. I've been thinking about using it as a media server with my LCD TV, stereo system and Airport Express, but I'd like to hear what I could do to get the most out of it. I'd like to figure out what I can do to make it compatible with newer operating systems. In essence, I'm trying to make my computer more 'future friendly' and I'd like to hear some possibilities on how to make it more compatible with newer operating systems (IE: what parts I'd need, how to replace parts, ect)

    I've considered using it as a digital picture frame, but I'm looking for a more practical use.

    I can post any specs if needed.

    Thanks,
    Pat
     
  2. simsaladimbamba, May 10, 2011
    Last edited: May 10, 2011

    simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    located
    #2
    To make it compatible with the current OS and future Mack OS X version, you need to replace almost the entire innards of the Mac, which includes the logic board, the CPU, the RAM and the GPU, as from Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard onwards, Mac OS X does not support PPC architecture anymore, thus only an entirely new Mac with an Intel CPU (any Mac from 2006 onwards) will work.
    To use it as media server might be a good idea, but you could also sell it and get a (used) Mac mini with an Intel CPU for that, as that uses less power, thus your energy bill will be lower.
     
  3. Reptile8, May 10, 2011
    Last edited: May 10, 2011

    Reptile8 macrumors newbie

    Reptile8

    Joined:
    May 8, 2011
    Location:
    Cheshire, UK
    #3
    If I am not mistaken Snow Leopard was released in 2009, so why does a 2006 Apple Mac not run it?

    I find this disappointing with Apple, the machines cost a lot of money to ordinary people, so for them to become so obsolete after a mere 3 years is not right!
     
  4. simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Location:
    located
    #4
    A 2006 Mac with an Intel CPU will run Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard, but a PPC iMac, the one the OP claims to have, even if purchased in 2007, will not run 10.6.

    OP, maybe check what Mac you have via these steps to look for the Model Identifier, so we can be sure, you have a PPC or Intel Mac.

     
  5. jouster macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2002
    Location:
    Connecticut
    #5
    I'd just stick it in the kitchen (or some other room you have that doesn't currently have a computer). The highest-end iMac that will ever exist can't be in two places at once (hmmm....unless they stream one account to a separate display!).

    That's the fate of my crappy beat-to-heck-and-back '06 MacBook. I use it for podcasts, ESPN 3, BBC Radio and a few other things while cooking. My kids can fire up some light web-based gaming (it's all Dora in my house). Camino is a good browser for that sort of thing on a PPC Mac. You have to clean it fairly frequently if you do a lot of roasting or sautéing and the like; the G5 should be easy to clean, though. I loved that computer but was a student when it was released and couldn't justify the price.

    The one thing I don't use it for is storing and finding recipes, which has been a proposed use of "home computers" since about 1974.

    Edit: I think the OP is familiar with the difference between PPC and X86, and is well aware of what it will run and what it won't.
     
  6. pja786 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 10, 2011
    #6
    Selling it for a used Mac Mini actually wouldn't be a bad idea since I'm looking for something with the Intel CPU to run certain applications with. I haven't actually thought of this idea yet, but I'm definitely going to look into it more

    I think that replacing the innards would be a fun side project, but it seems as though it would be quite pricey for a moderate to low pay off, esp when it would be was easier and perhaps cheaper to replace it with a Mini.

    Thanks for the response, this is certainly useful
     
  7. pja786, May 10, 2011
    Last edited: May 10, 2011

    pja786 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 10, 2011
    #7
    Does anyone think it would maximize profits if I sold it for individual parts or sell it as a whole unit?
     

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