what wifi to buy?

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by blondee028, Jan 31, 2015.

  1. blondee028 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2014
    Location:
    Las Vegas
    #1
    Okay my question is I am running a Netgear thats 10 years old,,still works but goes on and off drops signal and it gets hot. I want to get a good one thats easy to set up..really easy. I use it for my iPhone iPad I have a iMac but I usually have that hardwired in. I was looking at the Apple Extreme..it said easy. I remember years ago it was a real pain to set up and lock with password. Then I seen apple express..which was half the price of the extreme. What is the difference between them? I need help and info would greatly be appreciated. Its not like Apple has any sales but I need to get one soon.
     
  2. robgendreau macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    #2
    An Airport Express is a far less capable router.

    I'd suggest you check smallnetbuilder.com. They have great info on which routers work best. The Airport Extreme is OK, but still uses proprietary software to even configure it, unlike most other routers. It also doesn't allow external antennas, and isn't as fast as some more recent AC1750+ routers.
     
  3. blondee028 thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2014
    Location:
    Las Vegas
    #3
    Thanks for your help I decided to go with Linksys AC1750 went to a local Staples picked it up came home and set up was a breeze..everything is connected up and running.
     
  4. tdhurst macrumors 68040

    tdhurst

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2003
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    #4
    Sure, but...

    You mean the proprietary software that's free on all Macs?

    Are you comparing that to the browser-based controls most consumer routers use?
     
  5. dXTC macrumors 68020

    dXTC

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2006
    Location:
    Up, up in my studio, studio
    #5
    I do believe he means that, but not in the sense you're mentioning. Apple routers' configuration software is indeed free of cost, but it is also fully closed-source. Many other routers can, in addition to the factory default browser-based configuration firmware, be fitted with the open-source DD-WRT router firmware that often gives significantly finer control over the router's functions.

    One such function is QoS for ensuring lag-free throughput for certain data traffic (e.g. hardcore online gaming). Last time I looked at my Airport Extreme's status, its control software had no QoS functionality, and had even been "dumbed down" from when I first installed-- its advanced configuration options are quite limited now.
     
  6. SusanK macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2012
    #6
    The software that abandons Airport Extreme leaving the Apple user to rely on Windows to administer the AE? I think that's what the poster was referring to.
     
  7. h9826790 macrumors 604

    h9826790

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2014
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    #7
    Airport Express only support 100Mb/s wired network, but Airport Extreme support 1000Mb/s.

    The new Airport Extreme has 802.11ac, but Airport Express only has 802.11n.

    It depends on what you need, if 100Mb/s and 802.11n is good enough for you, you may choose the Airport Express rather than the Airport Extreme.
     
  8. crzdcolombian macrumors 6502a

    crzdcolombian

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2010
    #8
    get the airport extreme 5th generation for $50 bucks

    If you want AC get the 6th generation Airport extreme on eBay. last year I paid 120 for both the 6th generation and a 5th generation one. I am sure you can get a used 6th generation one for $100 bucks.

    I have yet to have a issue and I get the speed that my provider tells me. My place is 2000 square feet and works fine
     
  9. phrehdd macrumors 68040

    phrehdd

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2008
    #9
    The proprietary software used to be pretty good but like many Apple choices, they dumbed it down in the last few iterations. Its great for a beginner but absolutely sucks for those that have experience with routers and opt to make certain changes that Apple doesn't directly support. Then again, the web interface on 3rd party routers are "free" and do offer far more control and choices than Apple's "free" software.

    As pointed out it is a good idea to check out SmallNetBuilder. We can readily see that the AE sits at being one of the most expensive routers in its class and yet not a top performer.
     

Share This Page