What's an ExpressCard?

ghall

macrumors 68040
Original poster
Jun 27, 2006
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Rhode Island
I'm getting a MacBook Pro, and I whould like to know what an ExpressCard is. What is it's purpose?
 

ender78

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Jan 9, 2005
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ghall said:
I'm getting a MacBook Pro, and I whould like to know what an ExpressCard is. What is it's purpose?
The ExpressCard is the next generation of PC-CARD aka PCMCIA. It is an expansion slot for notebooks. Capabale of PCI-Express bus speeds.
 

ghall

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Original poster
Jun 27, 2006
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Rhode Island
ender78 said:
The ExpressCard is the next generation of PC-CARD aka PCMCIA. It is an expansion slot for notebooks. Capabale of PCI-Express bus speeds.
That doesnt help me.
 

ender78

macrumors 6502
Jan 9, 2005
329
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ghall said:
That doesnt help me.

What would you like then? You asked what it is, do you want specific examples or devices? If so, have you tried google?
 

Josias

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Mar 10, 2006
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In some notebooks, there are the "old" PC-card slots (aka PCMCIA). You can use them for many things. It's like an expansion port. You can out in a card that gives ypu extra USB or FireWire ports, a wireless internet card and so on.

The Expresscard/34 is a newer technology, which can do pretty much the same. Since there are really no useful Mac compatible cards for Expresscard/34, it's kinda obsolete on the MBP. However, if they were upgraded to Expresscard/54, they would be very useful.;)
 

ghall

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Original poster
Jun 27, 2006
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Rhode Island
Josias said:
In some notebooks, there are the "old" PC-card slots (aka PCMCIA). You can use them for many things. It's like an expansion port. You can out in a card that gives ypu extra USB or FireWire ports, a wireless internet card and so on.

The Expresscard/34 is a newer technology, which can do pretty much the same. Since there are really no useful Mac compatible cards for Expresscard/34, it's kinda obsolete on the MBP. However, if they were upgraded to Expresscard/54, they would be very useful.;)
Thank you, that was very helpful! I think I understand now.
 

Silentwave

macrumors 68000
May 26, 2006
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Gainesville, FL
Josias said:
The Expresscard/34 is a newer technology, which can do pretty much the same. Since there are really no useful Mac compatible cards for Expresscard/34, it's kinda obsolete on the MBP. However, if they were upgraded to Expresscard/54, they would be very useful.;)

Thats not true!
I can add additional FW/USB ports, or eSATA, or other cool stuff like that :p

though I would like /54 for memory readers etc.
 

projectle

macrumors 6502a
Oct 11, 2005
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Why not just get a USB2 memory card reader?

Sure it is "outside" (gasp) of your computer, however USB2 will outperform even the highest end memory cards avaliable today.
 

Silentwave

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May 26, 2006
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Gainesville, FL
projectle said:
Why not just get a USB2 memory card reader?

Sure it is "outside" (gasp) of your computer, however USB2 will outperform even the highest end memory cards avaliable today.
I have one. And it depends on your particular card reader and card.

If I had lots of $, I'd have the Sandisk Extreme IV FW800 card reader with Extreme IV CF cards. But I do like to eat.
 

petecantuhines

macrumors newbie
Jul 1, 2011
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ghall
I found this on pcmag.com: "The ExpressCard is a plug-in module that superseded the PC Card standard for adding functionality to laptops. ExpressCard boosted the data rate from 132 to 342 Mbytes/sec. It supports USB 2.0 and single lane PCI Express and can use both of these channels in the same module at the same time (see USB and PCI Express)"
Smaller than PC Cards:
ExpressCards are PC cards (PC Cards are plug-in modules that contain devices such as a modem, network adapter, sound card, solid state drive or hard disk) 11 mm shorter than PC Cards and come in two widths: 54 mm and 34 mm. ExpressCard 54 mm slots accommodate both sizes.

An Internal USB Solution:
The ExpressCard eliminates the need to carry an external USB storage device and cable. For example, a USB hard drive or flash drive can remain within the laptop when traveling, with, at most, a small protrusion jutting out from the side. See PC Card.
http://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia_term/0,2542,t=ExpressCard&i=42886,00.asp
Hope this is useful
 

cube

macrumors P6
May 10, 2004
16,966
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You can also add an ExpressCard 3G modem which does not stick out as much as a USB 3G dongle (subject to carrier support).