What's the big charger for?

3lite

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Nov 7, 2011
635
28
Does anyone even use it? The only thing I use and have seen anyone use is the mag safe charger.
 

powerstrokin

macrumors 6502a
May 18, 2013
696
1
I think OP is talking about the 85 watt charger. It's for 15 and 17 inch MacBooks. The 13 inch MacBook uses a 60 watt charger.

At least, for the older models such as my mid 2010 MBP.
 

ecschwarz

macrumors 65816
Jun 28, 2010
1,234
227
I think OP is talking about the 85 watt charger. It's for 15 and 17 inch MacBooks. The 13 inch MacBook uses a 60 watt charger.

At least, for the older models such as my mid 2010 MBP.
I think so - whenever Apple switched to the L-shaped MagSafe connectors, the 85w brick shrunk to be the same size as the 45w and 60w one, but was still compatible with all MacBooks...that's what I have at home and a 60w that came with my machine in my bag.
 

priitv8

macrumors 68040
Jan 13, 2011
3,518
437
Estonia
I think so - whenever Apple switched to the L-shaped MagSafe connectors, the 85w brick shrunk to be the same size as the 45w and 60w one...
How did you come to that conclusion?
My late 2013 85W Magsafe 2 adapter is exactly the same size as the one that came with my Late 2008 model. And they are both larger than 60W adapter that accompanied MacBook and the 45W adapter from MBA is smaller still.
 
Last edited:

laurihoefs

macrumors 6502a
Mar 1, 2013
792
22
How did you come to that conclusion?
My late 2013 85W Magsafe 2 adapter is exactly the same size as the one that came with my Late 2008 model. And they are both larger than 60W adapter that and the 45W adapter from MBA is smaller still.
I have a 2006 or 2007 Magsafe 85W adapter, and it is a bit larger than the later ones, or my current Magsafe 2 version. But both are also clearly larger than any 60W or 45W models I've seen.
 

Qaanol

macrumors 6502a
Jun 21, 2010
568
11
There are three major reasons I use it:

First, so I can increase the length of the cord.

Second, so I don’t block multiple outlets on a power strip when the “end” outlet is already taken.

Third, and most importantly, so I can put the power brick up against my socks to keep my toes warm.
 

Justinhub2003

macrumors regular
Jul 17, 2012
137
0
Cincinnati Oh
I do.

I use it as a stationary cord for my desk which is a decent distance from a plug.

I'd bet a lot of people would be upset if Apple shipped with such a short cord with no way of extending it.
 

ecschwarz

macrumors 65816
Jun 28, 2010
1,234
227
How did you come to that conclusion?
My late 2013 85W Magsafe 2 adapter is exactly the same size as the one that came with my Late 2008 model. And they are both larger than 60W adapter that accompanied MacBook and the 45W adapter from MBA is smaller still.
The 85W adapter that shipped with the first few versions of the MacBook Pro was actually rectangle-shaped, looking more like the AirPort Express of that era (still compatible with any original MagSafe-equipped MacBook/MacBook Pro/MacBook Air) or MagSafe 2 machine with an adapter. This changed in mid-2007 when it became square-shaped, like the 60W that was shipping with the plastic MacBooks.

http://www.engadget.com/2007/07/20/apples-macbookpro-85w-magsafe-adapter-finally-shrunk/

I have a 2006 or 2007 Magsafe 85W adapter, and it is a bit larger than the later ones, or my current Magsafe 2 version. But both are also clearly larger than any 60W or 45W models I've seen.
I will gladly admit my error and ignorance on the size of the bricks - they're rather close, but once I put my machine's 60W and a recently-acquired 85W side-by-side, I realized that there is a slight difference. When I sold my Early 2008 15" MBP and got my current Mid-2012 13" MBP, the change in adapter size was so insignificant that I didn't notice - similarly, the 45W on the Air is just a tad smaller than the 60W - thanks for setting me straight on that!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/vivitawin/5157026325/
 

alphaod

macrumors Core
Feb 9, 2008
22,046
1,104
NYC
Yeah. What's the point of that?
Longer extension cord.

Also it has a grounding pin. Not much of an issue in the US, but in countries with 200-240V power systems, without a grounding pin, if you touch your Mac's aluminum surface, you'll feel this buzzing sensation. It helps with static discharge (because static electricity can kill your computer) and against electrical surges (can also kill your computer and you).
 

priitv8

macrumors 68040
Jan 13, 2011
3,518
437
Estonia
...in countries with 200-240V power systems, without a grounding pin, if you touch your Mac's aluminum surface, you'll feel this buzzing sensation.
Strange. We've got a 220V power grid and although the Apple cord is grounded, I know for sure that this grounding is not present in the wiring behind the wall.
I've never felt any buzzing sensation from any low-voltage (ie those that have power transformers in or at them) home appliances.
 

Cmd-the-World

macrumors regular
Apr 7, 2010
150
0
Strange. We've got a 220V power grid and although the Apple cord is grounded, I know for sure that this grounding is not present in the wiring behind the wall.
I've never felt any buzzing sensation from any low-voltage (ie those that have power transformers in or at them) home appliances.
I only experienced this sensation with a 2008 model iMac. It came with the incorrect cable for my country and I had bought an adapter without a grounding pin. Whenever I touched the case and I was barefoot I would feel this sensation. I immediately went and bought a grounded adapter and solved the problem. However like I said that is the only device that I experienced it on. The Aluminium Mac Mini doesn't even have a grounding pin (since it uses a figure of 8 connector) and doesn't show such a problem.
 

Sym0

macrumors 6502
Jun 6, 2013
392
43
Anything with metal in it has to be grounded. Otherwise you'll get electrocuted if there is a short to that metal part.
 

snaky69

macrumors 603
Mar 14, 2008
5,903
480
Yeah. What's the point of that?
Reaching a power outlet that is far from wherever you're working.

Also, that cord actually has a ground plug, which is never a bad thing to have in case of a power surge.
 

laurihoefs

macrumors 6502a
Mar 1, 2013
792
22
I will gladly admit my error and ignorance on the size of the bricks - they're rather close, but once I put my machine's 60W and a recently-acquired 85W side-by-side, I realized that there is a slight difference. When I sold my Early 2008 15" MBP and got my current Mid-2012 13" MBP, the change in adapter size was so insignificant that I didn't notice - similarly, the 45W on the Air is just a tad smaller than the 60W - thanks for setting me straight on that!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/vivitawin/5157026325/
I would not go as far as calling that ignorance :) Like you said, the difference is rather subtle. To be honest, I recalled it being much more noticeable than it actually is!
 

simonsi

macrumors 601
Jan 3, 2014
4,849
716
Auckland
Anything with metal in it has to be grounded. Otherwise you'll get electrocuted if there is a short to that metal part.
Double-insulation is very common in consumer electronics (and has been for 30+years AFAIK), and obviates the need for an earth connection.