Whats the difference between a cocoa and carbon app?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by hdsalinas, Jun 4, 2008.

  1. hdsalinas macrumors 6502

    hdsalinas

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2006
    Location:
    San Pedro Sula, Honduras
    #1
    With all the speculation about 10.6 dropping support for carbon apps, I wonder, what are the diferences?

    From an end user non progamer point of view what are the main diferrences between these to apps (user interface).

    What are some examples apps?
     
  2. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2002
    Location:
    London
    #2
    There are no visible differences at a UI level. Or at least there don't have to be. Many major third-party apps including all of the Adobe Creative Suite applications and Microsoft Office are Carbon applications. Most new-ish Apple applications and many smaller third-party applications are Cocoa.

    As an end-user you should not be concerned at all. Carbon and Cocoa are simply 2 different ways for programmers to get the same out. Some will like Carbon, the rest of us know we're right and use Cocoa :p
     
  3. NAG macrumors 68030

    NAG

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2003
    Location:
    /usr/local/apps/nag
    #3
    Cocoa gets a few built in things easier like the Services menu and the spell checker as well as the special character pallete, I believe.

    Basically the end user has no real need to care at this point in time.
     
  4. agentphish macrumors 65816

    agentphish

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2004
    #4
    This will mean another "complete rewrite" of Adobe's Creative Suite, and major delays in release and having things work properly with Adobe.
     
  5. NAG macrumors 68030

    NAG

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2003
    Location:
    /usr/local/apps/nag
    #5
    That is assuming 10.6 drops carbon completely. We have no clue what is really going to happen here so spreading FUD is counter productive.
     
  6. tersono macrumors 68000

    tersono

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #6
    This is highly unlikely as there are a number of industry-standard applications that require the carbon API (Adobe, Quark etc). I suspect that Apple are aiming simply to re-write the remaining parts of OS X that use carbon to use the cocoa API instead.

    Don't get me wrong - carbon IS going away, but it's a little too soon - Apple would be shooting themselves in the foot.
     

Share This Page