What's the normal temp. and fan speed for a unibody MacBook?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by natatos, Jul 20, 2009.

  1. natatos macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2008
    Location:
    Iowa
    #1
    Heres an iStat pic its in Celsius.
    [​IMG]

    Also I have the 13" MacBooks thats now a MacBook Pro would you count that as a MBP now.
     
  2. ShiryuX macrumors member

    ShiryuX

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Location:
    Belgium
    #2
    I wouldn't call it the same as the macbook pro's now (but that's just me).

    Anyways, is that while working or encoding something or idle? Seems a bit high working but in acceptable range, although if that's idling it seems a bit too high.

    Fans are working at high speeds too but that's probably due to higher temps.
    Normally an idling Macbook should run at 40 degrees with fans at 2000 rpm.
    Working/gaming/encoding should be around 60 degrees but no idea on fans there.
    Probably higher but 5692 seems a bit too much to me.

    (Someone can confirm or argue though, don't have a macbook yet but that's what I've been reading)
     
  3. tempusfugit macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    May 21, 2009
    Location:
    Chicago
    #3
    if by normal you mean standard, i dont know about the temp but the fans run at about 2000 rpm normally. I use smcfancontrol and it stays at about 45-50 C @ 4000 rpm while plugged in.
     
  4. flopticalcube macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

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    In the velcro closure of America's Hat
    #4
    No data yet for the Aluminum MBs (I would say they are the same as the Pros since the hardware is nearly identical vis-a-vis temp) but the MacBooks in general idle around 51-55C and top out at 80 on average according to this: http://www.intelmactemp.com/list
     
  5. ShiryuX macrumors member

    ShiryuX

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Location:
    Belgium
    #5
    I have a related question:

    How bearable is the heat on most macbooks? (Unibody older ones and the new late 2009 ones?)

    With heat I mean when having the macbook on your legs and if it's on a desk how much the keyboard/palm rest heats up.

    Might be useful for people to know (other than me) ;)
     
  6. uanuglyfool macrumors regular

    uanuglyfool

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2009
    Location:
    The Moon, CA
    #6
    here's my fan speed.

    The highest ive seen it go is like 6100
     

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  7. ShiryuX macrumors member

    ShiryuX

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    Location:
    Belgium
    #7
    Yeah fan speeds tend to go up that high, because your temps seem very high to me. Most macbooks tend to peak at 80-90 degrees and that's already overdoing it I believe.

    Tried asking an apple store near you? These temps don't look healthy to me.

    EDIT: My bad man...If those are all fahrenheit temperatures, you're fine. I was thinking in Celsius :)
     
  8. matthewscott661 macrumors 6502

    matthewscott661

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2009
    Location:
    Chicago
    #8
    My MacBook normally runs around 120-130 F, but watching a movie or playing the sims it can get upwards of 170-180 F. When I play the sims the fan usually gets up to about 6100 RPM, never seen it get higher than that.
     
  9. jpyc7 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2009
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    #9
    I've only had my MBP 13" (2.26 GHz) for a few days now. It's definitely warm, though bearable. This is my first aluminum Mac laptop. Before I had a white iBook which also gets warm. I haven't measured the case temperature, but I guess if it feels warm it must be at least 105 F, but below 120F. That's just based on knowing that taking showers above 120F can burn babies.
     
  10. LTX macrumors regular

    LTX

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2008
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    #10
    The fan generally goes from 1800 rpm to 6100 rpm. It sounds like something is using a lot of your CPU power and causing it to heat up, causing the fan speed to increase. Check Activity Monitor to see what's using the most CPU. 70 degrees is quite high, but not dangerous.
     

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