What's the qualification for Apple's tech support???

applekiwipeach

macrumors member
Original poster
Jul 5, 2010
89
0
The tech support over the phone aren't knowledgeable at all.

My bf and I were new to iPhone and iTune Apps downloading. It was our first time sharing apps since we're in the same household. Everything worked fine until we saw updates on our iPhones and tried to click download. It always prompted us to enter the security code on the back of the credit card for verification. Once we entered it, we were bounced back to the download screen. When we clicked download again, same thing happened... so we called.... (now we know that we needed to log on to each other's itune account on our iPhones once. )

We got to speak with a representative pretty quickly and selected iTune related issues on the automated system. He did not seem to have a clue and kept us on the phone for nearly 30 minutes. We had to go somewhere so we hung up...

We called again. A lady picked up. After long waiting, she finally returned from researching, asking if we used Mac or Windows. We said Windows. She asked, "did you know how to add a user on the windows account?" I was puzzled, asking "you mean iTune account or WIndows account?" She said windows account. She said, you just need to add the other user to your windows user account. The iTune will then be able to recognize two accounts."

I was pretty sure she got confused, and suddenly realized we might have to log on to each other's account on our iPhones just like we did with the iTune on computer.... problem solved...


Now that I think about it... adding a windows user account?? Has she gotten common sense??
 

tunerX

Suspended
Nov 5, 2009
355
839
You need to have good language skills and an ability to search an online database that contains problems/fixes. Good language skills is pretty much subjective. Typing and operating the trouble ticket database is the main skill required.

That is pretty much the norm for any phone based help desk.
 

applekiwipeach

macrumors member
Original poster
Jul 5, 2010
89
0
You need to have good language skills and an ability to search an online database that contains problems/fixes. Good language skills is pretty much subjective. Typing and operating the trouble ticket database is the main skill required.

That is pretty much the norm for any phone based help desk.
I see. So they really don't have to have much knowledge of or experience with the product at all... That explains it...
 

tunerX

Suspended
Nov 5, 2009
355
839
They need some experience in the field and to be trained at Cupertino for a few weeks.
Yeah, help desk on a phone is monkey work.

Genius bar gets some tech training but they are not really experts. Some are good because they strive to be good but those people are not the norm.

It would make apple look pretty bad if you go to the genius bar and the guy is searching a database to help you.
 

appleguy123

macrumors 604
Apr 1, 2009
6,559
639
15 minutes in the future
Yeah, help desk on a phone is monkey work.

Genius bar gets some tech training but they are not really experts. Some are good because they strive to be good but those people are not the norm.

It would make apple look pretty bad if you go to the genius bar and the guy is searching a database to help you.
They don't really help you on the spot. THey just replace or take your computer in for repair later.
 

applekiwipeach

macrumors member
Original poster
Jul 5, 2010
89
0
I see. Now I understand how this works a lot better and will never ever call their tech support again. BUT the lack of knowledge of the tech support over the phone DOES make Apple look bad too...
 

tunerX

Suspended
Nov 5, 2009
355
839
They don't really help you on the spot. THey just replace or take your computer in for repair later.
I guess that depends on your local store. My not-so-local store will assist you straight away. I thought that is how most stores operated; customer oriented business strategy.
 

JediMeister

macrumors 68040
Oct 9, 2008
3,263
3
Sorry you had such a horrible experience. I've had nothing by the best customer support when calling in for help on my Mac. Maybe it's different for iPhone support since they're usually contractors and not standardized agents? One tip should you choose to call in for phone support from any company and get a shoddy experience: you can always ask to speak to someone else or in the case of AppleCare the magic words are "Could I speak to a supervisor on someone in a managerial position?" With that simple statement you can hopefully bypass the inexperience or ignorance of the initial agent and get yourself in the fast lane to a potential fix or someone who can establish a better understanding of the issue and save yourself the trouble of explaining the whole thing over to someone still won't get what is going on.
 

Julien

macrumors G4
Jun 30, 2007
11,252
4,171
Atlanta
I see. Now I understand how this works a lot better and will never ever call their tech support again. BUT the lack of knowledge of the tech support over the phone DOES make Apple look bad too...
Call Dell or Quicken (or almost any other) tech support and you will learn how good Apple's is in comparison.;)
 

MicroApple

macrumors regular
Jul 26, 2010
154
0
I had one apple tech support agent they didn't know the answer because it wasn't in the knowledge base. And I was like are you ****ing kidding me.

Basically save your self the support call if its not here, they don't have an answer:
http://www.apple.com/support/iphone/

They won't answer any questions.
 

Glitterkidd777

macrumors newbie
Jul 15, 2010
27
6
Louisville, KY
call htc, or google for tech support. Compare and contrast.

Not everyone is on the same level, and I'm pretty sure they did some heavy hiring prior to iphone 4 release, so there are a lot of newbies. They will at least try to assist you to the best of their ability, and if they can't fix it, they will either transfer to someone who can, or set up a genius bar appointment.

Another good thing to remember is itunes doesn't have phone support, so if you have an issue with your itunes account, you have to contact itunes via email. (http://www.apple.com/support/itunes)
 

applekiwipeach

macrumors member
Original poster
Jul 5, 2010
89
0
well, yes, she did have good attitude. That's the only reason why I was still polite with her on the phone... :rolleyes:

Yeah, I'll just ask for someone in an upper position directly to save some time. Didn't feel it was appropriate since she was trying obviously... Actually i doubt i'll ever call them again anyway... google search and this forum are much more helpful... :D
 

murdercitydevil

macrumors 68000
Feb 23, 2010
1,561
0
california
Sleeve tattoos, lip piercing preferably, skinny jeans, very little intelligence.

EDIT: oh you meant the phone tech support. Who knows? I always imagine them wearing lab coats.
 

Consultant

macrumors G5
Jun 27, 2007
13,292
20
I see. Now I understand how this works a lot better and will never ever call their tech support again. BUT the lack of knowledge of the tech support over the phone DOES make Apple look bad too...
LOL. That's like saying all Microsoft users are like Steve Ballmer.
 

thetexan

macrumors 6502a
May 11, 2009
720
0
The best support I've ever gotten was from Microsoft's professional support. Anyone who works in IT who has ever called these guys knows what I'm talking about.

I was working with a Microsoft engineer over an activedirectory issue a few weekends ago and I sent him a link to a knowledge base article wondering if it would help in our situation and he said "Oh, I'm the guy who wrote that article. It won't help with us and the reason is.....". Basically they take full ownership of an issue from ticket open to close. They don't send you to a "tier 3" support, though they will conference in other engineers and experts. I was told that the people who work at Microsoft professional support are the ones who write how-to and troubleshooting articles, and some have even published books or written for major publishers for their fields of expertise.
 
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