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Texas_Toast

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Hello. In another thread about AP switching to Sony, someone posted a link to an article which has this photo in it...

(I'd post the link, but for some strange reason, you get yelled at on MacRumors for cross-refencing stuff?!) :rolleyes:


1596214251458.png



Being seriously behind-the-times, I could use some help figuring out the gear this female journalist (?) is using...

(And it doesn't help that nearly everything in the photo is black or navy color?!)

1.) What is between the "dead cat" and her lens? Maybe some kind of bracket?

2.) What kind of microphone setup do you think she has?

3.) What is that rectangular thing at the top of her camera? (I was watching some videos on YouTube earlier this week of kids sneaking into abandoned places and shooting video, and they had something like that on the top of there DSLR as well...)

4.) What is on the back of her camera? (Almost looks liek a bolt-on back?)

5.) Is she using a tripod or something else?

6.) I guess she is shooting video and not images?


When you respond, if you are able to links to products (e.g. B&H Photo) that would be a plus!! :)


Thanks!
 

Clix Pix

macrumors Core
Probably the Digital Video subforum would be a better place to ask these questions..... Most of the people who participate in the digital photography subforum tend to focus on still photography as opposed to videography; seems to me that if there are any actual professional photojournalists/videographers hanging out on MR it would be in the digital video section.....
 

oblomow

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Apr 14, 2005
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Are you capable of *not* always making back-handed comments to me?

I never claimed to be a *professional* journalist or photojournalist.

But I have said that I used to be a serious *amateur* photographer.

What's so confusing about that?

If you can't say something constructive, then how about saying nothing instead?
I think you misintepreted Clixpix. According to me Clixpix is referring you to the video subforum where you'll find professionals that can help you. This subforum is mainly populated by still photographers who probably can't answer your questions.
 

||\||

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Hello. In another thread about AP switching to Sony, someone posted a link to an article which has this photo in it...

(I'd post the link, but for some strange reason, you get yelled at on MacRumors for cross-refencing stuff?!) :rolleyes:


View attachment 939280


Being seriously behind-the-times, I could use some help figuring out the gear this female journalist (?) is using...

(And it doesn't help that nearly everything in the photo is black or navy color?!)

1.) What is between the "dead cat" and her lens? Maybe some kind of bracket?

2.) What kind of microphone setup do you think she has?

3.) What is that rectangular thing at the top of her camera? (I was watching some videos on YouTube earlier this week of kids sneaking into abandoned places and shooting video, and they had something like that on the top of there DSLR as well...)

4.) What is on the back of her camera? (Almost looks liek a bolt-on back?)

5.) Is she using a tripod or something else?

6.) I guess she is shooting video and not images?


When you respond, if you are able to links to products (e.g. B&H Photo) that would be a plus!! :)


Thanks!

It looks like a really intense live-streaming set up. The thing with holes in it is a stabilizer. The camera is handheldd. The thing on top is a phone. Probably tethered to send video out to Facebook or some other platform or possibly as a monitor if the camera has no articulating LCD on the back. The thing in the middle is probably sound-related.
 

Texas_Toast

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I think what @Clix Pix was politely saying was the question you asked is about video equipment looking at the picture, there is a separate sub forum on MR that would probably be a better place to ask about video set up.

The photo is of a DSLR, not a video camera, so that is why I created the thread here...

(At least that s what it looks like to me)
 
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Texas_Toast

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It looks like a really intense live-streaming set up.

Is that a DSLR or a video camera?

So you think the journalist/shooter is live-streaming, huh?


The thing with holes in it is a stabilizer.

The hole on top of the camera? I thought that might be a see-through mount of some sort?


The camera is handheldd. The thing on top is a phone. Probably tethered to send video out to Facebook or some other platform or possibly as a monitor if the camera has no articulating LCD on the back.

How exactly would you live-stream something?


The thing in the middle is probably sound-related.

Well, there is a "dead cat" - that's the mic. But I was curious about the see-through mount thing.
 

||\||

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Is that a DSLR or a video camera?

My guess it that it's both. For nearly a decade SLRs have been able to shoot video as well as photos. A .mov or .mp4 is essentially just a series of compressed photos ("frames") strung together, similar to that old school flip book from back in the day. Have you ever seen a film strip?
 
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Texas_Toast

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My guess it that it's both. For nearly a decade SLRs have been able to shoot video as well as photos.

Yes, I've owned such cameras like 15 years ago, but that is not a video camera - it's a camera trying to be a video camera! ;-)


A .mov or .mp4 is essentially just a series of compressed photos ("frames") strung together, similar to that old school flip book from back in the day.

True, but I'm sure a dedicaetd video camera has a lot of features and capabilities that a DSLR simply doesn't have.


Have you ever seen a film strip?

Grew up watching them!
 

jagolden

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Feb 11, 2002
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Simply a rack you mount your camera to. The racks have maaannnnyy additional mounting points for mics, lighting. Recorders, etc.. etc.
For professionals or enthusiast they have become extremely popular. They also have an "I’m cool" factor for the people that don’t need but buy them.
Doesn’t look like she’s using a tripod or monopod, wouldn’t be viable in the situation she’s in. If she is shooting video she could be doing it strictly hand-held or could be using a hand held stabilizer.
 

robgendreau

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Jul 13, 2008
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It's a Sony alpha camera in a cage with a zoom lens mounted and a variable ND filter on it plus a microphone with a wind screen and some sort of audio amp and an iPhone on top - shrug
WTF is with all the drama?
Yeah, I think a Small Rig cage, if I can make out the letters. I at first thought that was the monitor on top, but obviously a smartphone. On recent Sonys it can connect via wifi to act as a monitor and control the camera. Can't figure out which Sony (probably not the new A7s...).

You can go to Small Rig's website to see all the cages and brackets.

The still is from AP's video announcing they are now using Sony's for their work.

For a detailed account of what another news outlet uses for video and occasional stills, there's this for VICE: https://nofilmschool.com/2014/07/camera-rigs-used-by-vice-news. They're using a 5D and video cameras from Canon.
 
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Texas_Toast

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Simply a rack you mount your camera to.

So you agree that photo is of a DSLR and not a video camera, right?

And what do you formally call this "rack"?

If you could provide a link to one (e.g. B*H) that would be helpful!


The racks have maaannnnyy additional mounting points for mics, lighting. Recorders, etc.. etc.

Nifty idea! How long have they been around?


For professionals or enthusiast they have become extremely popular. They also have an "I’m cool" factor for the people that don’t need but buy them.

Yeah, I used to always roll my eyes when people would be out with 600mm lens or even just a large lens shade to feel important.


Doesn’t look like she’s using a tripod or monopod, wouldn’t be viable in the situation she’s in. If she is shooting video she could be doing it strictly hand-held or could be using a hand held stabilizer.

Probably pretty hard to hold things steady for any amount of time with all of that extra weight and no tripod, right?
 

Texas_Toast

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Yeah, I think a Small Rig cage, if I can make out the letters.

Are those designed just for DSLRs or video camers too?

Are they good to have?


I at first thought that was the monitor on top, but obviously a smartphone.

I thought it might be a monitor too.

Not having the video I mentioned above, do people often hook up extra monitors to their DSLRs and/or digital video cameras?

What exactly is the purpose?

In the adandon building video I watched earlier, they had something similar on a DSLR, but I think it may have been an LED light - which sorta makes sense if you are sneaking around an abandoned building without any electricity! :)


On recent Sonys it can connect via wifi to act as a monitor and control the camera. Can't figure out which Sony (probably not the new A7s...).

Interesting...


You can go to Small Rig's website to see all the cages and brackets.

Oh, so that is the brand name?


The still is from AP's video announcing they are now using Sony's for their work.

For a detailed account of what another news outlet uses for video and occasional stills, there's this for VICE: https://nofilmschool.com/2014/07/camera-rigs-used-by-vice-news. They're using a 5D and video cameras from Canon.

I'll check it out after supper - thanks! :)
 

Darmok N Jalad

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Sep 26, 2017
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Looks like a Sony Alpha, with a cage, probably something like this, but there are many variants of such racks, and videographers love them. The cage just allows for easy mounting of other accessories, like mics, handles, lights, screen mounts, shades, and more. The cage is just the beginning. I'd assume the person is using this rig for video, and it can be done handheld. I've seen videos elsewhere of people building something like this and use it as a "running camera." The Lumix GH5s is one such camera that is frequently used for this application, since it's a video-centric body and has good IBIS.

No way to provide you exact items here--too dark of a photo and a lot of work to cross reference product photos with this image. The sky is really the limit though.
 

Alexander.Of.Oz

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Oct 29, 2013
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Hello. In another thread about AP switching to Sony, someone posted a link to an article which has this photo in it...

(I'd post the link, but for some strange reason, you get yelled at on MacRumors for cross-refencing stuff?!) :rolleyes:


View attachment 939280


Being seriously behind-the-times, I could use some help figuring out the gear this female journalist (?) is using...

(And it doesn't help that nearly everything in the photo is black or navy color?!)

1.) What is between the "dead cat" and her lens? Maybe some kind of bracket?

2.) What kind of microphone setup do you think she has?

3.) What is that rectangular thing at the top of her camera? (I was watching some videos on YouTube earlier this week of kids sneaking into abandoned places and shooting video, and they had something like that on the top of there DSLR as well...)

4.) What is on the back of her camera? (Almost looks liek a bolt-on back?)

5.) Is she using a tripod or something else?

6.) I guess she is shooting video and not images?


When you respond, if you are able to links to products (e.g. B&H Photo) that would be a plus!! :)


Thanks!
@Texas_Toast it's very similar to the sort of rig builds I work with when capturing video of Climate Activists and Protesters with my a7III actually!

It's just a series of SmallRig accessories allowing everything to be sturdily attached to the camera. The orientations I speak with are as if you were the camera operator by the way, just to clarify.

  • First a cage around the body which protects the body and provides stupidly flexible mounting points for accessories to be attached as needed.
  • A side handle mounted from the top left of the cage on a swivel mount.
  • An XLR input device mounted in the hotshoe for pro audio capture, I can't quite make out what it is though, it could be a through device feeding phantom power to the mic, or it could be an external capture device, I'd suspect it to feed into the camera and power the mic.
  • Another handle mounted up top that sits only just above the audio device for mounting the mic. on as there's no room to use it as a handle.
  • A protector for the mic. mount, as they are usually a form of rubber strings under tension and not suited to riot situations.
  • On top of the top handle is a swivel mount for the mobile to be used as a monitor and livefeed point.
  • I suspect by the way they are holding it that there is another handle on the right of the cage too.
  • Underneath is a large Manfrotto standard mounting plate for quick attachment to a gimbal, monopod or tripod.
That is all. ;)

I would never work one handed though, always with both hands on the rigged out cage as this allows the best stability. Using handles either side allows you a nice firm grasp with it becoming almost shoulder width apart!

Here is a list of SmallRig accessories on B&H for you to scroll through! Hope that helps.

On a side note, here's my old Blackmagic 4K Pocket Cinema Camera rigged up for some handheld manual focus pulling work when I was doing some interviews and covering a protest about our bushfires this last Summer. I've since gotten rid of it, moving to Sony. The plate on top takes standard Sony NP-F970 batteries to keep it running for up to six hours at a time. The video micro mic is only for matching audio, I always mic people up with lavaliers when outside and then match that later in post production. This is sitting on a Manfrotto large mounting plate, so I could release the rig from the manual focus pulling, which I only did when on the tripod. This allowed me to go between tripod, monopod, gimbal and handheld quickly and effortlessly as needed.

IMG_8012.jpg


The following image is of the same camera in the cage naked.

IMG_8460.jpg
 
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Alexander.Of.Oz

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@Alexander.Of.Oz,

Thanks for helping to dissect the photo in my OP, and for sharing about your gear! ?
That's cool. @jagolden , @redshifted , @robgendreau and @Darmok N Jalad had already done the heavy lifting! ;)

Some Mirrorless cameras are more than capable video cameras. The recently released Sony a7SIII is on par with my old 4K cinema camera in most regards and even beyond it in regards to focus, bitrate and high ISO capabilities. The days of needing dedicated video cameras for semi-pro and low level pro work are no longer with us!
 
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Texas_Toast

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Some Mirrorless cameras are more than capable video cameras. The recently released Sony a7SIII is on par with my old 4K cinema camera in most regards and even beyond it in regards to focus, bitrate and high ISO capabilities. The days of needing dedicated video cameras for semi-pro and low level pro work are no longer with us!

I was going to ask about this (and hopefully not get stned in the Digital Photography forum)....

So why do you, and people in general, shoot video with a "camera"?

I'm of the mindset that if you need a hammer, then use a hammer. And if you need a screwdriver, then use a screwdriver.

Is it a budgetary thing?

Now I can't really say anything, because I am shooting video on my iPhone 6S Plus, but I started this thread because I'm playing around with the idea of someday stepping up and getting a nice digital video camera.

Also, from an ergonomics standpoint, I would think user a 35mm digital camera would be awkward?!
 

Alexander.Of.Oz

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I was going to ask about this (and hopefully not get stned in the Digital Photography forum)....

So why do you, and people in general, shoot video with a "camera"?

I'm of the mindset that if you need a hammer, then use a hammer. And if you need a screwdriver, then use a screwdriver.

Is it a budgetary thing?

Now I can't really say anything, because I am shooting video on my iPhone 6S Plus, but I started this thread because I'm playing around with the idea of someday stepping up and getting a nice digital video camera.

Also, from an ergonomics standpoint, I would think user a 35mm digital camera would be awkward?!
I can't speak for others, but for me it's versatility! I have a kick@s$ camera for photography and great video quality straight out of camera or captured in Log format for extensive colour correction and editing. Plus, I have the ability to very quickly move between the two when needed, instead of trying to export still frames from moving footage at a far lesser quality.

Technology has changed over the last five years or so to a point where dedicated video capture devices are aimed (almost) solely at the top end of town. Welcome to the new world where SUV's come in about four different varieties! There is no longer just one old type of SUV. Same goes for camera's and a lot of other things. Technology evolves and we either stand by screaming for the past or embrace the new and run with it.

Ask yourself and answer honestly! "Am I still driving the same type of car I first learnt to drive in?" If the answer is no, then you have no need for any resistance to changing to evolving technology with a camera either! ;)

Having said that, we have a few members of this sub-forum that embrace working with emulsion for their photography and do that rather well if I might say so! However, that is a bit different to running around using an old shoulder-mounted VHS camera, like I found at an abandoned inner-city place! Great if you want 'that look' but otherwise outdated in so many regards.

IMG_1015.jpg


I would suggest looking at a camera that does both video and stills when you head off looking, to save your space, time, etc. The technology is so easy to use and the quality when used properly is quite remarkable, all things considered.

Awkward? Perhaps if trying to use it in its basic form, hence why cages and all the paraphernalia came to be! Widen your grip on it and with the incredible in body stability available on modern cameras you are good to go, or whack it on top of a gimbal and you're golden! I never capture video footage with any of my cameras in their base state. I never did with my cinema camera's either! they got kitted out dependent on what I was doing and how they needed to be used, from handheld, to shoulder mounted, to tripod, monopod or gimbal mounted. Each required its own setup.

Think seriously about what you would like to capture with your video and research how that is achieved these days to see what sort of rigs and cameras are recommended. Like with cars, there's differences aplenty!
 
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Texas_Toast

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Technology has changed over the last five years or so to a point where dedicated video capture devices are aimed (almost) solely at the top end of town.

Okay.


Ask yourself and answer honestly! "Am I still driving the same type of car I first learnt to drive in?" If the answer is no, then you have no need for any resistance to changing to evolving technology with a camera either! ;)

Actually, I drive an old Honda that is probably older than a lot of people on this forum, so bad analogy! *LOL*



Wow............

I mean WOW!!!



I would suggest looking at a camera that does both video and stills when you head off looking, to save your space, time, etc. The technology is so easy to use and the quality when used properly is quite remarkable, all things considered.

Yeah, clearly I have A LOT to re-learn about camera equipment since I was shooting...


Think seriously about what you would like to capture with your video and research how that is achieved these days to see what sort of rigs and cameras are recommended. Like with cars, there's differences aplenty!

Clearly, I have a lot to think about...

Bu to be honest, I would say that my time is best spent learning to be a better videographer AND learning the editing side of video for now.

Right now my focus is entirely on "man-in-the-street" interviews, and even if you gave me a $10,000 camera, I'd probably still prefer my iPhone!

Why?

Because strangers let me interview them on the street with my iPhone... And with a big fancy camera they wouldn't - and it's all about the interview!!


Good to know I have access to so many knowledgable people when I do have questions! :)
 
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Alexander.Of.Oz

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Clearly, I have a lot to think about...

Bu to be honest, I would say that my time is best spent learning to be a better videographer AND learning the editing side of video for now.

Right now my focus is entirely on "man-in-the-street" interviews, and even if you gave me a $10,000 camera, I'd probably still prefer my iPhone!

Why?

Because strangers let me interview them on the street with my iPhone... And with a big fancy camera they wouldn't - and it's all about the interview!!


Good to know I have access to so many knowledgable people when I do have questions! :)
In that case check out some online tutorial sites for making and editing documentaries and how to interview well. Stick to your mobile phone, maybe get a small gimbal for it if you want the footage a bit smoother again and finally get a small audio capture device with some sort of semi-directional mic on it, so you can hear what they are saying instead of all the background presence.
 
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