What’s wrong with the EOS R?

steveash

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Aug 7, 2008
496
212
UK
Honest question. It looks like a pretty good if unexceptional camera with all the features of the 5D mk4 (minus a card slot) plus some mirrorless benefits. Yet it seems to get derided as being not up to scratch. Am I missing something? It is looking like a grey market bargain at the moment.
 

anotherscotsman

macrumors 68020
Aug 2, 2014
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13,821
UK
I’ve had one for nearly a year now. Coming from the 6D, it was an easy transition. Your summary is about right in my experience. A lot of the early criticism seemed to be based on not having read the manual before doing the video review. Like the 6D, it’s not sports-orientated but that suits me. No second card slot? How did we ever manage....

Ive no regrets in selling the 6D (another underrated camera) to get the R. Similar size and weight with a good rear screen. I even like the EVF, something I didn’t like on other cameras prior to the R.

Only real criticism (towards mirrorless in general likely) is difficulty in strong sunlight where it is difficult to beat OVF.

Like the 6D, it doesn’t have the bells-and-whistles for all genres but is a very capable all-rounder with good resolution, clean and typically Canon images.
 

ASenseOfLambert

Suspended
Jan 22, 2020
3
3
New York City
There’s nothing inherently wrong with it, except for the same price (category) you might as well get IBIS, a better sensor, a better flat profile, better dynamic range, better lens ecosystem and a full sensor video capture if you went with Sony a7 III. I mean, isn’t budgeting all that it comes down to? If it weren’t, we would’ve all went with Hasselblad(s) and RED/ Arri cameras by now.
 

Ledgem

macrumors 68000
Jan 18, 2008
1,842
590
Hawaii, USA
Only real criticism (towards mirrorless in general likely) is difficulty in strong sunlight where it is difficult to beat OVF.
I think I had this issue with an early-generation EVF (first- or second-generation, and it was an add-on unit that wasn't built into the camera), but haven't had it with current-generation cameras. If anything, the camera compensates to give you an evenly-lit image, whereas with an OVF you'd basically be squinting and having to hope that your pupils constrict enough so that you're not being blinded.

If the camera company offers full functionality for their EVF, it's the same deal with the darkness. My Fuji lacks this feature and thus represents a handicap, but Olympus have implemented a special mode that slows the refresh rate in darkness so that your preview in the EVF is always lit evenly. In pitch black the EVF might not refresh more than once every second or two, but you'll still be able to see... whereas with an OVF you're limited by what your own eyes can see (which is likely better than many EVFs operating in standard mode). It's like having night vision, plus you can still magnify the scene to adjust manual focus. It's the ultimate for low-light shooting.
 

anotherscotsman

macrumors 68020
Aug 2, 2014
2,101
13,821
UK
I think I had this issue with an early-generation EVF (first- or second-generation, and it was an add-on unit that wasn't built into the camera), but haven't had it with current-generation cameras. If anything, the camera compensates to give you an evenly-lit image, whereas with an OVF you'd basically be squinting and having to hope that your pupils constrict enough so that you're not being blinded.

If the camera company offers full functionality for their EVF, it's the same deal with the darkness. My Fuji lacks this feature and thus represents a handicap, but Olympus have implemented a special mode that slows the refresh rate in darkness so that your preview in the EVF is always lit evenly. In pitch black the EVF might not refresh more than once every second or two, but you'll still be able to see... whereas with an OVF you're limited by what your own eyes can see (which is likely better than many EVFs operating in standard mode). It's like having night vision, plus you can still magnify the scene to adjust manual focus. It's the ultimate for low-light shooting.
Agreed- my comments on EVF were certainly towards earlier generations. I’m very happy with the EVF on the R. far superior to OVF in low light situations and the exposure simulation mode in the R seems pretty accurate/representative.

Another feature in the R that works very well is the manual focus guide.
 

tcphoto1

macrumors 6502
Aug 21, 2008
342
1,717
Nashville, TN
The EOS R is a new system and Canon seems to have new features in the pipeline. I've been shooting professionally for 25 years and have owned many systems from 35mm film, 120mm Mamiya645/RZ, Pentax67II and now 35mm DSLR's. I haven't tried the EOS R but would wait for at least a 2 card body considering my living depends on image security. I believe the two 5DIV's I purchased in September '18 will serve me well for a few years but will watch as new features are introduced.
 

MacNut

macrumors Core
Jan 4, 2002
21,912
8,164
CT
Cannon appears to be raising the bar.

Pre announcing the EOS R5.
The details we are getting today include that there will be a newly developed full-frame CMOS sensor at the heart of the R5. No doubt that this is what unlocks many of the newest functions. Specifically, Canon says the camera will be able to reach 20 fps using an electronic shutter and 12 fps with a mechanical shutter. That 20 fps figure should be particularly impressive considering Canon’s flagship EOS-1D X Mark III offers that same maximum speed. The new R5 even steps up video, offering 8K recording options. Having such as high-resolution video mode allows users to extract high-resolution stills or make the best use of the extra resolution to generate even better 4K footage.
 

darthaddie

macrumors member
Sep 20, 2018
48
34
Planet Earth
I have 3 bodies and shoot weddings and corporate work on these. no issues whatsoever. Yes, it could be better, but it’s great so far. I like shooting on the canon more than my Sony A7R3s. For me it’s a quicker editing process since I do not like the skin tones out of the Sony.
 

steveash

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Aug 7, 2008
496
212
UK
Thanks for all the answers. Looks like most of the negativity is misplaced but it’s probably worth waiting (and saving for) the next generation.
 

steveash

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Aug 7, 2008
496
212
UK
There's always something better coming. Would it do the job for you at the right price and with enough useful life?
It would do fine, but it would be a second camera and it isn't urgent. I'd hate to buy a camera and barely use it before it is replaced. On the other hand, there should be some good deals on the old one, when the new one comes out.