When are the ARM laptops are coming?

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by MacBH928, Dec 2, 2011.

  1. MacBH928 macrumors 68020

    MacBH928

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    May 17, 2008
    #1
    I hate how my Macbooks turns HOT especially while ripping DVDs or converting long video files(or flash) and love how the iPad is always so cool. I heard that ARM processors are coming to the laptop and even Windows is supporting this architecture . But does any one know when to expect these laptops to be out?
     
  2. simsaladimbamba

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    #2
    When ARM will support 64-bit architecture and when they will be at least on par with current Intel offerings, thus it will take a while.
     
  3. MacBH928 thread starter macrumors 68020

    MacBH928

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    #3
    so many many years....
    I thought they were close like in 2 years or so
     
  4. firewood macrumors 604

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    #4
    OK. The Apple A9X processor in the iPad Pro is now 64-bit, with single core performance equal or better than that of the Intel processors in the MacBook Retina and mid-model MacBook Air. Has this changed the likelihood of a MacBook (e.g. with a keyboard, trackpad, and OS X) running an ARM processor (for the OS and apps) instead of an x86? How long might it take for Apple to introduce such a model? (And I assume that Apple wouldn't kill existing Mac models with Intel processors for those customers who need BootCamp or native performance VMs).

    If Apple ports Xcode and Terminal to ARM (and a few other apps, such as Pixelmator got ported), I'd might get an ARM MacBook for my primary machine (as I don't run legacy apps daily). I assume (perhaps incorrectly) that an ARM (A10X?) MacBook would either be a bit lighter or provide slightly longer battery life, plus have higher performance graphics.
     
  5. Admiral, Nov 13, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2015

    Admiral macrumors regular

    Admiral

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    #5
    Apple's A-series SoCs have been 64-bit since the A7 was introduced in 2013. That was one of the astounding feats of engineering they announced at the time. Caused a bit of controversy because Phil Schiller said it was a "desktop-class" processor and people didn't want to believe it.

    I have been waiting with bated breath since then. The Retina MacBook is okay, I guess, but I am certain the A10 or A10X will open a large performance delta with whatever Intel is flogging next summer. Apple could stun us all and integrate two A10s onto a single board for massive multiprocessing.
     
  6. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #6
    The A9X is looking like a very potent processor, though I don't know who well it will do running a desktop OS with its multithreaded demands.

    If apple put iOS on a ARM laptop, that would be a horrible mistake, just look at the grumbling that is occurring with the iPad Pro, i.e., a "pro" product that is limited due to the mobile OS its running (I'm not confirming the issue, just relaying it).
     
  7. Admiral macrumors regular

    Admiral

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    #7
    It's because of the multithreading that I think multiple processors may be advisable. But then we have to get a grip on power consumption. Anyway, it should be something to see. Fanless Mac Mini with multiple A10s?
     
  8. scaramoosh macrumors 6502

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    Nov 30, 2014
    #8
    The problem is OSX is x86 based, so the amount of things it would break would make the Macs useless for at least 2 or 3 years. It's taken the iPad 5 years to get to the point it is now and still it's not offering a Laptop replacement experience. The iPad Pro is out but when are the developers jumping on board? When are Apple going to do something with IOS to make it useful? Why is there no Desktop on the Pad Pro? It's not like they have a wealth of ARM based apps to instantly be there and all stuff like Steam just wouldn't work at all and never would.
     
  9. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #9
    Similar to the PPC to Intel transition, it would require an emulator that allows existing apps to run
     
  10. pastrychef macrumors 601

    pastrychef

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    #10
    It was never designed to used as a laptop. It was designed from the ground up with a touch UI.

    There are already apps designed for the iPad Pro.

    Millions of people find iOS useful.

    Again, it was never designed to be a traditional desktop OS.
     
  11. firewood macrumors 604

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    #11
    Because desktop apps belong on a MacBook or Mac instead, arm64 or x86, with a keyboard, trackpad (or mouse), and OS X/Cocoa.

    Not iOS + touch.

    OS X apps in Objective C or Swift built with Xcode should be trivial to port to an OS X arm64 desktop target. Maybe even OS X Universal.
     
  12. scaramoosh macrumors 6502

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    #12

    For me a Desktop is key to productivity.
     
  13. PTLove macrumors 6502

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    #13
    That transition was lineup wide. Apple will never, NEVER actively support two architectures at once. If they ever make a ARM transition for OSX, it has to be portfolio wide, including all the way up to the iMac and MBP (I suppose Mac Pro could theoretically branch off).

    ARM isnt where it needs to be for that yet. When you give Intel 35Watts (which the MBP does) it smokes ARM.

    Thats why I expect, as much as others hate the idea, the goal is to transition to iOS. Apple is keeping them seperate to avoid the huge headache of a new OSX transition ( and working with the performance issues on the high end ). My personal opinion is Apple plans to forgo OSX in ~6 years.
     
  14. TechGod macrumors 68040

    TechGod

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    #14
    The A10X, if its front end is fast enough i.e. able to execute more instructions than it can be fed, then we might see SMT (Simultaneous MultiThreading) which is the technology that Intel calls "Hyperthreading".

    That would certainly help in multithreaded situations and could hypothetically be powerful enough to emulate x86 when needed. Alternatively they could manufacture on LPP (Low Power Plus) instead of LPE (Low Power Early) as the former is suited to higher clock counts and desktop class CPUs. It'll be interesting to see what they do with the A10X.
     

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