iPad when did Apple release the iPad w Retina Display

Discussion in 'iPad' started by fjs08, Jul 30, 2014.

  1. fjs08 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2003
    #1
    when did Apple release the iPad w Retina Display and the iPad Air??
    I want to buy a new iPad, but not sure how far into the current cycle the current hardware is.
    Thx.
    Frank
     
  2. jdblas69 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2012
    #2
    Ipad 3rd generation and onward was the first of the retina displays.

    Ipad mini 2nd generation was retina.
     
  3. joshkhaos1 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2014
    #3
    iPad with Retina (the new iPad, as it was called) was early 2012. iPad Air was November of last year.
     
  4. fjs08 thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2003
    #4
    So I am assuming that the iPad Air is the latest and greatest??
    I don't follow that technology too closely. I apologize.
    I see the iPad Air has an A7 chip while the iPad w Retina has an A6.
    So the iPad Air is almost 9 months old.
    Frank
     
  5. Tyler23 macrumors 603

    Tyler23

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2010
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    #5
    Correct, the iPad Air is the latest and greatest.

    However, new iPads are generally released in October. A new iPad is expected this October as well - spec wise, it likely won't be much different from the iPad Air, however, it is expected to gain Touch ID which is currently only available on the iPhone 5s. So if that's important to you, you might want to wait, especially since October is only 3 months away.
     
  6. fjs08 thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2003
    #6
    Tyler23,
    Thx for the note. Exactly what I was looking for.
    May head up to the Apple store this weekend.

    Want to use Win for a few programs. Had toyed w buying a Surface 3 or Yoga to gain tablet/PC, but I really like the iPads (I have an ancient one), and it seems I can put Win on my MBP... Read that the MBP is the best "PC" out there.
    So it appears my best choice would be the iPad Air and win on my MBP. That should work.
    Thx again for the info.
    Frank
     
  7. Night Spring macrumors G5

    Night Spring

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    #7
    I am using Windows on an MacBook Air, and yes, it is the best laptop I have owned.

    However, OS X is gradually wining me over. I'm especially looking forward to the tighter integration between iPads and Macs that are supposed to come with the next OS updates this fall.

    But the greatest part about owning a Mac is it is so easy to switch between OS X and Windows. Just click a icon in Settings (in taskbar in Windows) to pick your OS, and it shuts down and reboots in the other OS. So if you do get a MacBook, make sure to give the Mac OS a try. ;)
     
  8. fjs08 thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2003
    #8
    Night Spring,
    Are you using Boot Camp?? Sounds like you are running one OS at a time??
    One of the big debates when using Win w a Mac is to run Win via Parallels or Boot Camp. My need for Win is minimal, so I was thinking of using Boot Camp. As I understand it, under parallels Win runs as a "virtual OS" but w Boot Camp, you are actually booting into Windows... I guess that's correct.
    Thx for the note.
    Frank
     
  9. Night Spring macrumors G5

    Night Spring

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    #9
    Yes, I'm using bootcamp.

    I tried Parallels, but I found it a bit slow and clumsy. Running things in virtual machines will always be slower than running things natively. The thing I hated the most about it, however, was I could never remember what key combinations worked where. You know, Macs and Windows use different keyboard shortcuts, so for example, in order to quit a program, in Windows you press Alt+F4 and in Mac you press Cmd+Q. So when running Windows app and Mac apps side by side, I'd get confused and find myself pressing the wrong key combinations for that program. Running one OS at a time on bootcamp, I can get into one mindset and forget about the other set of shortcuts.

    But if you just use a Windows program once every often, then rebooting your computer just to use that one program might be too much bother. So it really is up to you what fits better with the way you work.
     
  10. Ledgem macrumors 65816

    Ledgem

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2008
    Location:
    Hawaii, USA
    #10
    As some others have mentioned, Apple has a fairly predictable product refresh schedule. New iPads and iPhones are announced around September/October, and become available for purchase around October/November.

    MacRumors has a part of their website devoted to determining when the timing is right to purchase a new Mac product, based upon calculating the release schedules. It might be useful for future reference: http://buyersguide.macrumors.com

    When I first made the switch from Windows to Mac, I use Parallels to help with the transition. If you have enough RAM, the virtual machine performance isn't poor at all. (How is much "enough" depends on what you're doing in both Mac OS and Windows. If you buy a system with 8 GB of RAM, you likely have more than enough.)

    The nice thing about the virtual machine instead of Bootcamp is the ability to switch back and forth quickly and easily. For example, I was in Parallels almost all of the time during the first week with my Mac, because I didn't know of Mac-equivalent programs and I was still clumsy on the Mac side. Yet I gradually found Mac-side replacement programs and learned how to do things, and the amount of time I spent in Parallels diminished. I'd still fire Parallels up if I needed to get something done and didn't have the time to try and figure it out on the Mac side, but it allowed me to learn at my own pace, stress-free. Looking back on it, if I'd used Bootcamp I might have just continued using Windows, because booting back and forth would have been a pain and I would have been uncomfortable with the all-or-nothing approach. Having Windows running in the background while I used the Mac side was a nice security blanket :) (Booting back and forth is less of a big deal these days, with solid-state drives making the process take seconds instead of minutes.)
     
  11. saberahul macrumors 68040

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2008
    Location:
    USA
    #11
    Certain software applications allow you to map key combinations so this wouldn't happen.

    As per bootcamp vs. virtual OS, depends on need but bootcamp will always be better. If its minimal resource work, shouldn't be too different. 3D CAD, for example, is a different story.
     

Share This Page