When is best to upgrade?

Discussion in 'macOS' started by jago25_98, Apr 5, 2017.

  1. jago25_98 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2017
    #1
    I have a window nagging me to upgrade to Sierra.

    I don't want to because I'm afraid it will break things. Sure, there is the security aspect but that is mostly the browser and for apps I scan anything I install.
    The risk of everything slowing down is just a lot, lot greater than getting malware.

    What's the best way to do it?
    Let's not get into the specifics of 'Is your mac new?' or not. I am trying to learn the best way to upgrade or a way to handle not upgrading.

    I've heard some people say that missing an update actually is the worst - and that the next time you update you'll be in for trouble - by skipping that update the next one is more likely to break things.

    But on the other hand I've heard people say "Don't update - Apple will cripple your old hardware deliberately. They favour the newer hardware."

    ^ well, if that's the case at what point do you decide to stop updating?

    And, at what point do you consider an update fully tested to be safe to upgrade? How long do you wait to search for people who have written about problems?


    I'm coming from linux, windows and android. All of those had thier own best ways to handle. For linux I found it was best only to upgrade the browser. For Android I found it was best to wait about 2 months after the latest release had been tested. For Windows I generally upgraded a week after the update had been released but kept the browser as new as I can.
     
  2. Fishrrman macrumors G5

    Fishrrman

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    #2
    You didn't tell us which version of the OS that you're using now.

    If you're using 10.11 (El Capitan), and it's working fine, there's no compelling reason to upgrade.
     
  3. Gregg2 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    #3
    On the other hand, if you're using 10.11 (El Capitan), and it's working fine, that is likely to be true with Sierra. Where you run into the problems you're worried about is when you've skipped several updates and your other software is older.
     
  4. jago25_98 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2017
    #4
    When you say 'your other software' you're talking installed non app store apps right?

    Perhaps I can get osx to do one update at a time to avoid this jumped upgrade risk?

    I'm not interested in specifics though - I want to learn a decision process so I can make my own decisions in the future.
     
  5. Gregg2 macrumors 603

    Joined:
    May 22, 2008
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    #5
    Yes.

    One at a time doesn't help with those apps.
     

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