When should I update my Unibody Macbook

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by CoffeeWarrior, Jun 14, 2009.

  1. CoffeeWarrior macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    #1
    When should I update my unibody macbook aka The bastard Child of the family.

    I have the stock 2.0 ghz model

    I am planning on a 4 gig or 8 gig RAM update from crucial

    Also a 30 gig SSD.

    The question will be when is the next ssd price drop, also will there be an update to allow 8 gig of ram
     
  2. spinnerlys Guest

    spinnerlys

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Location:
    forlod bygningen
    #2
    Mostly maximum RAM capacity is tied to the chipset, so there won't be any unlocking in the future to have a maximum of 8GB of RAM.
    Mostly it will be 4GB, as stated on Apple's website, but some people managed to get 6GB of RAM into that bastard of yours.

    Also SSD price drops are developing over time, the more people buy SSDs the cheaper they get as manufacturing masses of them will get cheaper too as the manufacturing process matures and components get cheaper.
     
  3. Sweeperdk macrumors regular

    Sweeperdk

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2009
    Location:
    Århus, Denmark
    #3
    Well, update your macbook when it doesn't do what you require of it. I also have the 2.0 and will be going for 4 gigs of ram shortly, plus a 500 gb 7200 rpm hdd.

    I do believe that you will regret getting a 30 gig SSD to be honest. You'll hardly have room for anything on it, other than OSX.

    I personally wouldnt do it.
     
  4. Richard1028 macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2009
    #4
    That bastard macbook of yours has enough self-esteem problems without decking it out with a puny 30gb SSD. Hold out for something bigger and make the lil' guy proud.

    Afterall, size *is* everything.
     
  5. CoffeeWarrior thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    #5
    The 30 gig will most likely be around 24 usable space due to its formatting etc...

    I tried a western digital 7200 rpm in mine and I noticed the extra vibration and around 20 minutes decrease in battery life. Its more noticable because of the unibody alluminum body, the vibration has no where to go except your wrist.
     
  6. CoffeeWarrior thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    #6
    I'm naming him Fred, the macbook.

    OCZ has a nice SSD 30 gig for about 120 dollars. Lets say there is 15 gig left after the install. I think that might be enough for PDF's and word documents. My I-tunes library is only 7 gigs.
     
  7. Sweeperdk macrumors regular

    Sweeperdk

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    Jun 13, 2009
    Location:
    Århus, Denmark
    #7

    If u want an SSD, then go for a 128 gigs. Yes, it costs quite a bit, but seriously, you WILL regret a 30 gig.

    I'm unsure if you'll actually even be able to run OSX on a 30 gig
     
  8. CoffeeWarrior thread starter macrumors regular

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    Jun 12, 2009
    #8
    How so ? Leopard uses around 13 gig ??? And snow leopard is going to use much less
     
  9. zap2 macrumors 604

    zap2

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Location:
    Washington D.C
    #9
    Its run just fine, not a ton of room for media, but it will run

    I'd go for a larger SDD because I'd like my laptop to be truly portable(with only backups elsewhere)..but its a personal call
     
  10. Sweeperdk macrumors regular

    Sweeperdk

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2009
    Location:
    Århus, Denmark
    #10
    It was the size of my installation that got me wondering... 98 gigs available when I got the machine. (120 gb harddisc). I personally could not have a machine without any programs installed. I do need the space.

    Plus, a lot of available space on the harddisc equals a smoother running machine.

    But hey, it's your machine, and your money :)
     
  11. CoffeeWarrior thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    #11
    How so ?
     
  12. Sweeperdk macrumors regular

    Sweeperdk

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2009
    Location:
    Århus, Denmark
    #12
    For one, a disc with not a lot of free space will need to be defragmentet more often, since fragmentation takes up space.

    I believe the recommendation to do it, is when a disc is more than 90% full to allow for smooth running. Luckily OSX does most of this by itself, but takes up ressources to do so.

    Another (major) factor with having enough discspace, is updates. If I remember correctly, OSX places updates "far away" from the systemfiles already on the disc, and require a fair amount of space to be installed. Once installed, the problem is gone IF the installation can be carried out.

    I had a friend have this problem no later than last tuesday. His machine had enough room to download the install, but during the install process his machine was bogged down, and restarted, but could not fully load OSX due to errors while updating (not enough available disc-space).

    Result? He had to do a full wipe to get his machine up and running again.
     
  13. Bengt77 macrumors 68000

    Bengt77

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    Jun 7, 2002
    Location:
    Europe
  14. Bengt77 macrumors 68000

    Bengt77

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2002
    Location:
    Europe
    #15
    I'd say OZC. It seems to be a really fast drive, judging from the reviews I've read. Plus, it's 50% bigger for only 20% extra.
     

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