When you change watch faces . . .

profmatt

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Mar 7, 2015
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When you change your watch face, you scroll through a list of mini versions. All the complications show accurate information (e.g. they show my next calendar event and not a generic one) yet the time is shown as 10.10am and not the actual time. Is this just me, or does it work like that for everyone? And why didn't they bother to programme it so that it shows the actual time?
 

Julien

macrumors G4
Jun 30, 2007
11,249
4,161
Atlanta
When you change your watch face, you scroll through a list of mini versions. All the complications show accurate information (e.g. they show my next calendar event and not a generic one) yet the time is shown as 10.10am and not the actual time. Is this just me, or does it work like that for everyone? And why didn't they bother to programme it so that it shows the actual time?
What time does your avatar say?;)

Also Apple uses 10:09 and not 10:10. The :apple:Watch is 1 faster.:D
 
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profmatt

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Mar 7, 2015
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I get the whole 10:10 thing on watch faces in shops and so on. But I'm talking about when you change the face on your Apple Watch. All the faces on display have up-to-date information on them, except the time. It seems a bit dumb.
 
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profmatt

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I actually found it pretty cool that it animates that way.
Fair enough. On the plus side, at least it's not a bug and it's not a problem unique to my watch.

If I could only get the sunrise/sunset thing to work I'd be blissfully happy . . .
 
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chadsteruw

macrumors member
Jul 14, 2007
84
10
Seattle, WA
I get the whole 10:10 thing on watch faces in shops and so on. But I'm talking about when you change the face on your Apple Watch. All the faces on display have up-to-date information on them, except the time. It seems a bit dumb.
If I had to guess, it's so you can see what the watch arms look like. If you were trying to change your watch face at noon, you wouldn't be able to tell what the arms look like pointing at other numbers.

Just a thought.

But you're not the only one.
 
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fireman13

macrumors 6502
Aug 12, 2008
272
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Florida Panhandle
I believe they show it that way because its pleasing to the eye. The hour hand and minute hand are stretched out evenly and the second hand is pointing straight down. not sure, but that's what I think
 
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crispApple

macrumors regular
Jan 22, 2015
237
67
Wisconsin
They have been doing that for years. Even on the website you'll notice all the devices are at 10:09. I think it goes back to when Steve Jobs was alive he unveiled something at that exact time.



*edit. It was 9:41 when Jobs unveiled the iPhone. It is an industry thing as stated.
 
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dictoresno

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Apr 30, 2012
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from another website......

The real reason for the setting? Aesthetics. The 10:10 position gives the clock or watch a number of benefits:

• The hands are not overlapping, so they're fully and clearly visible and their styling can be admired.

• The arrangement of the hands is symmetrical, which people generally find more pleasant than asymmetry, making the product more appealing to customers.

• The manufacturer's logo, usually in the center of the face under the 12, is not only visible but nicely framed by the hands.

• Additional elements on the face (like date windows or secondary dials), usually placed near the 3, 6, or 9, won't be obscured.
 
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Michael CM1

macrumors 603
Feb 4, 2008
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I get the whole 10:10 thing on watch faces in shops and so on. But I'm talking about when you change the face on your Apple Watch. All the faces on display have up-to-date information on them, except the time. It seems a bit dumb.
You're changing your watch face wrong. :p
 
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iPhysicist

macrumors 65816
Nov 9, 2009
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Dresden
The time is correct, so the :apple:Watch got in front of the camera one minute before the other watches making IT faster.:D
Thumbs up! But just maybe the "photographer" just made a better (read faster) job.


But well we know these pictures are not photographs anymore so the 2D/3D artist must have been the faster guy :eek:
 
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danmart

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Apr 24, 2015
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Lancs, UK
Saw a programme on marketing a while back which covered the watch hands thing - it's because our brain unconsciously interprets the hands as a smile and so reacts positively!
 
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kdarling

macrumors P6
When you change your watch face, you scroll through a list of mini versions. All the complications show accurate information (e.g. they show my next calendar event and not a generic one) yet the time is shown as 10.10am and not the actual time. Is this just me, or does it work like that for everyone? And why didn't they bother to programme it so that it shows the actual time?
Interestingly, many of the third party Android Wear watchfaces (which are set from your phone) _do_ show both the complications and current time. So I knew what you meant right away.

However, the stock Android Wear watchfaces simply show the standard ~10:10 preview like the Apple Watch, and we can see why that makes sense from the standpoint of seeing the separate hands, etc.

Re: 10:09 (Timex uses 10:09:36) ... that's what's used with analog hands, because then they're both the same angular distance from 12 and all hands are slightly away from covering most complications. Remember, the hour hand is only exactly over the 10 at 10:00. At 10:09, it's closer to 12, the same as the 09.
 
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samiznaetekto

macrumors 65816
Dec 26, 2009
1,016
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10:10 is visually more pleasing than 10:09:

- it's easier to read as we don't need to do 2 steps ("it's almost 10 minutes, but what looks like one notch less... so, 9 minutes")
- slight asymmetry looks more dynamic than static-looking "V"... like things are moving
- it looks more satisfying as the minute hand "snaps" on the big notch
- in digital format, 10:10 also looks less random and like the top scores in competition: 10 points, 10 points.
 
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Jefe's MacAir

macrumors 6502a
Nov 21, 2010
509
323
TLDR every response.

It's to highlight the monogram when you use it. And as you can see, it's traditionally where the maker leaves his mark on the watch. The hands are holding the logo/monogram/TM. You also can see both hands and generally where any window or complication would be i.e. best view of the ENTIRE watch for setting/display.
 
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