Where do you change the resolution?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by kat.hayes, Aug 11, 2016.

  1. kat.hayes macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2011
    #1
    Using a 2015 MBP, where is the option to change the display resolution?

    Thanks.
     
  2. andreyush macrumors 6502

    andreyush

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2015
    #2
    Sistem Preferences -> Displays -> Resolution - > Mark SCALED -> Change the resolution how you like it
     
  3. kat.hayes thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2011
    #3
    Thank you. The default resolution is 1280x800, it seems low, is there a reason why the resolution is not set higher?
     
  4. ajay96 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2013
    #4
    That's the default for retina, i believe it's "true" display is 2560x1600, but it's displayed at 1/2 that. You can try to go to 1440x900, which is what I use most of the time, but it isn't as crisp.
     
  5. kat.hayes thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2011
    #5
    For clarification, if the display is 2560x1600, why is not as crisp at 1440x900?
     
  6. leman macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    #6
    I never understood that as well. The usual argument is that the default 1280x800 resolution can be mapped pixel-perfectly to the 2560x1600 panel (every logical pixel is simply a 2x2 array of physical pixels) while scaled resolutions must use linear interpolation across pixels (that is, a physical pixel represents a blend of colours of logical pixels). But I think that this is a gross oversimplification of the real story. First of all, in HiDPI mode the content is drawn using sub-pixel precision. Second, the pixels are small enough that linear interpolation shouldn't introduce any noticeable artefacts — after all, any display hardware, be it CRT or LCD or anything else, ends up 'interpolating' the source image in this way or another. Furthermore, I strongly suspect that even in the default (non-scaled) mode the non-HiDPI content is upscaled using linear interpolation rather then simple 2x2 upscaling.

    Personally, I can't see any difference in image quality between different scaled modes and the non-scaled mode. Then again, I am not a trained artist, so my eyes might be not good enough. Even if there are artefacts, they would probably be limited to low-DPI images.
     
  7. ajay96 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2013
    #7
    The reason that i've always understood is what you basically said, the 2 to 1 pixel ratio. I did notice a battery decrease also if you go to a higher resolution, not much but enough to notice. I do tend to switch between them fairly often, I use a Program that does it with ease from the task bar.
     
  8. leman macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    #8
    Battery decrease is to be expected - maintaining higher resolutions results in a quadratic increase of GPU work/memory transfers. But as I've said, i find it difficult to buy the quality argument.
     

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