Where should I get my MVP developed?

Discussion in 'iOS Programming' started by RH9, Jun 21, 2015.

?

Independent developers or companies

  1. Independent developers

    2 vote(s)
    66.7%
  2. Companies

    1 vote(s)
    33.3%
  1. RH9, Jun 21, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 21, 2015

    RH9 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2015
    #1
    Hey guys,

    Sooo I've started my own start-up (app) this summer and it looks like I'm about to secure funding too. We're going to therefore action an iOS MVP as soon as the cash comes in. Does anybody know anywhere good to get this developed and I'm not talking about ****** outsourced work. Another start-up I co-founded actioned an Android MVP which sucks balls and cost a lot (damn Android). We used some crappy company out in the Czech Republic who done a decentish job after a ton of stupid expensive mistakes.

    Is it better to use companies to for development or independent developers for MVP. I really want this MVP to be well made, nothing fancy or top end but nothing horrific. We are looking to invest heavily into development for our MVP.
     
  2. Cromulent macrumors 603

    Cromulent

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Location:
    The Land of Hope and Glory
    #2
    You best option is to look for developers with a proven track record. Look at their portfolio and see what they have made in the past. Also speak to their old customers to see what they think about them. That should give you a good idea if they are decent or not.

    Edit:

    It doesn't make a difference if you go with a company or an independent developer. It costs £15 and takes about 10 minutes to set up a company where I am so being a company does not mean that they are somehow more trust worthy.
     
  3. 1458279 Suspended

    1458279

    Joined:
    May 1, 2010
    Location:
    California
    #3
    Have you considered hiring an employee? A company or an contractor can end up with the same set of problems.

    The issue at hand is trusting that both sides of the agreement can and will live up to their side of the agreement.

    I've done independent development for decades and have been an employee. Problems can start with improperly done project specs or oversold skills. Either side can cause problems. I've seen crap specs come from big companies, I've seen lawsuits result from huge companies because an employee oversold their skills.

    Given that the market for app dev is very tight, finding proper skills is much harder and that won't change any time soon.

    I'd advise to have contracted check points so that you know exactly where things are headed. Don't expect it to be cheap. An employee can be tested just as much as a contractor can be, but an employee can be fired pretty easily as well as trained as needed.
     
  4. RH9 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2015
    #4
    Hey Karl,

    You raised a fair point regarding companies. And I think looking through a developer's portfolio is a terrific idea as well as speaking to past customers! Thanks a lot for your comment, I sincerely appreciate you taking time out to help me. I shall put this into practice immediately!

    Best,
     
  5. dejo Moderator

    dejo

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    Location:
    The Centennial State
    #5
    What's an MVP? I'm not sure I've heard that term before, in this context.
     
  6. Cromulent macrumors 603

    Cromulent

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Location:
    The Land of Hope and Glory
    #6
    Minimum viable product I assume.
     
  7. firewood macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2003
    Location:
    Silicon Valley
    #7
    A company with a track record of major apps is more likely to have a team of designers, architects and developers (and test and QA people) who cover a much wider range of skills and capabilities than the typical individual consultant or freelancer. You usually get what you pay for in terms of development risk.
     
  8. Cromulent macrumors 603

    Cromulent

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Location:
    The Land of Hope and Glory
    #8
    In the UK a sole trader can have as many employees as they desire but they are not a company. A company is just one type of legal structure for a business to run under. In the UK they are generally private limited companies but there are other types of business such as a sole trader (as already mention), a partnership etc etc.

    Being a company does not necessarily infer anything about the business that you are doing business with.
     

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