Where to get correct screwdriver for case screws

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by Schlotkins, Nov 27, 2009.

  1. Schlotkins macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2008
    #1
    Good evening-

    I purchased a MBP 15" today (11/27/09) for my wife. I have a 160GB Intel SSD G2 to put in it. I'm driving myself crazy trying to get the case screws out. I don't want to strip them obviously. I had a kit of 6 small screw drivers, but none of them seemed to work. I read online through a google search the size was #00 so I ran out to microcenter, picked up a set of screwdrivers with #00 and #0 sizes, but neither of those seem to fit properly either.

    So, I was wondering if someone could direct me to a link where they used a screwdriver to remove the 10 bottom screws with no problem at all.

    Thank you,
    Chris
     
  2. NewMacbookPlz macrumors 68040

    NewMacbookPlz

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2008
    #2
    In the past with my G4 iBook, I've been able to use the Phillips screwdriver that comes with an eyeglasses repair kit with pretty good success.

    I haven't tried on my Unibody MacBook, but the screws look about the same size.
     
  3. neteng101 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2009
    #3
  4. l.a.rossmann macrumors 65816

    l.a.rossmann

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    May 15, 2009
    Location:
    Brooklyn
  5. m85476585 macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2008
    #5
    Home Depot and Lowes sell a $5 set with PH#0, 00, and 000. They have a similar set with T5-T15.
     
  6. CJS7070 macrumors 6502a

    CJS7070

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2008
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #6
    I used an eyeglass screwdriver and a lot of caution... It took a good deal of effort to turn the screws without stripping them, though.
     
  7. fluffyx macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2007
    #7
    If you have a Philips #00 screwdriver, it will work perfectly. Just place the computer on a soft cloth and make sure you apply some downward force while you're turning the screws.

    While you're handling the internal components, please keep one hand on the metal casing of the computer! Keep your computer safe!
     
  8. erratikmind macrumors 6502a

    erratikmind

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2009
    Location:
    S.F./Las Vegas
    #8
    That is a nice and handy kit. I got the same for a hdd swap. Didn't want to be unprepared.
     
  9. tardman91 macrumors 6502a

    tardman91

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2009
    Location:
    Tampa Area, FL
    #9
    I got a kit at Harbor Freight Tools for like $5 that has about 20 interchangeable tips for any kind of electronics screws that you can imagine.
     
  10. fabian9 macrumors 65816

    fabian9

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2007
    Location:
    Bristol, UK
    #10
    Yeh, the screws are a bit of a pain in the neck... I can't believe they're still using phillips screws, it's so easy to strip one of them. My plan is to replace them with torx head screws when I get the chance to.

    Phillips #00 did the trick for me though!

    Fabian
     
  11. Ride9650 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
    #11
    Wirelessly posted (Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 3_0 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/528.18 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile/7A341 Safari/528.16)

    Ya 00 will work, you just have to apply a bit of pressure, it's a bit unnerving but as long as you are careful, you should be fine
     
  12. alphaod macrumors Core

    alphaod

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Location:
    NYC
    #12
    Yep; one drawback is that they are a little pricey for the average consumer. Otherwise they make quality tools.
     
  13. LinMac macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2007
    #13
    They make very good tools. I used one during my upgrade to a RunCore SSD and it was perfect.
     
  14. danimal99 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2008
    #14
    I had a small Philips head that I used, but probably the biggest issue is the amount of torque you need to exert to break them loose the first time. I realized in the first second that it was going to be a problem, so I grabbed some good pliers to grip my screwdriver tightly and used it to turn instead. Like others suggested, lay it on a cloth to protect it, put a little downward pressure on it, then slowly turn your pliers/driver combo until they break loose. From there, it's all gravy.

    They're actually some of the best screws I've seen on electronics, and held up very well. I think my screwdriver was more likely to strip than those screws. As always, Apple goes the extra mile in build quality.
     

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