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Hypnosis

macrumors member
Original poster
Jun 16, 2015
40
4
I'm preferably looking for a free one, but if it is relatively cheap, I will surely invest in it. Also, I heard viruses and malware are "rarer" for iOS... is this true?
 

0007776

Suspended
Jul 11, 2006
6,473
8,170
Somewhere
I'd recommend not bothering with one unless you have a school or work network that requires you to have one installed. All currently existing malware for macs are trojans that require you to type in your admin password, so as long as you don't pirate software or type in your admin password to view files like pictures or movies you should be fine. The only thing it might help with is to prevent you from passing on a windows virus to someone else if it has already effected a file.
 

0007776

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Jul 11, 2006
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From my 8 years of using mac never have i used any sort of antivirus though i heard ClamXav is free.
For awhile I was at a university that required you to have an antivirus installed to connect to their network even if you were on a mac and that is what I used. It didn't seem to be too resource intensive, also didn't ever find anything as I don't download the kinds of things that get you the couple trojans out there. Once I was no longer required to have it I uninstalled it, but if you need an antivirus for some reason it seems like a fine one.
 

Samuelsan2001

macrumors 604
Oct 24, 2013
7,729
2,153
I use avast, as others say it is not needed but I like it's internet warnings and it's antimalware. If you often pass things on to others using windows it is a nice coutesy (and in the case of clients essential) to make sure you aren't passing on anything that can infect their windows machines.
 
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0007776

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Did you happen to search the forums to see if this topic has come up before? It has.
It doesn't hurt to see if things have changed since previous threads were made. It is possible for viruses to be made for macs, so if you don't know that there are still only Trojans available for macs you don't know if a topic made a year or so ago is still accurate.
 

happyfrappy

macrumors 6502
Oct 14, 2007
343
50
Location eh?
There are trojans from browser add-ons(Chrome is popular for this lately) or adware installers(password required), viruses are fairly Windows specific unless it was aimed at MS Word/Excel as a worm or marco virus within a template--since the code base of MS Office on the Mac is different you avoid MS Office for Windows created document threats but you can still pass those infected documents without knowing.
On the work front I'd only use an AV if you work in a Windows environment as that is your weakest security hole, I've known friends who had flash drives get flagged by AVs as a co-worker would blindly open attachments allowing nasty auto-run worms to infect any storage device plugged in. (Microsoft Security Essentials never seems to work in small business environments)

If your school/workplace requires an AV stick with ESET, less CPU usage, reliable scanning results(fewer false positives vs Norton & McAfee) and their security suite version includes email/attachment scanning plug-in for Outlook. Depending upon how much spam with trojan attachments you get, the security edition is useful as an extra layer of spam filtering and the recent addition of scanning "cloud drives" such as Dropbox/OneDrive. (previous ESET versions you couldn't scan your sync-ed cloud documents folder)
 

Bending Pixels

macrumors 65816
Jul 22, 2010
1,307
365
It doesn't hurt to see if things have changed since previous threads were made. It is possible for viruses to be made for macs, so if you don't know that there are still only Trojans available for macs you don't know if a topic made a year or so ago is still accurate.
FWIW, this question comes up at least weekly, if not more often.
 
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mlts22

macrumors 6502a
Oct 28, 2008
540
35
On OS 9 and previous, I'd recommend some AV program. OS X? Same OS category as Linux. There are hundreds of thousands of Linux boxes out there with zero AV on them, and they are not infected.

Instead, I'd consider an ad blocking utility, and a utility that doesn't allow add-ons like Flash or Acrobat to run unless you manually click on them.

Don't forget backups. Make sure you have some method of backup (TM, CCC, etc.) Focus on this far more of a priority than AV.

AV utilities on Macs are only useful if you have to have it for legal reasons. Otherwise, don't bother.
 
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Artimus12

macrumors 6502a
Nov 13, 2011
539
114
YooKay
I've been using Avast since ClamXav started charging a fee, but it seems a little intrusive, so I'm now testing Avira.
 

Partron22

macrumors 68030
Apr 13, 2011
2,655
808
Yes
On OS 9 and previous, I'd recommend some AV program.
There's some retro virus community pumping out 3.5" disks with classic Mac viruses on them?
nVir and Scores were the only ones I ever met in the wild. Strange to think that someone might still be targeting the 512K Macintosh that's been sitting in my closet since '92.
 

mlts22

macrumors 6502a
Oct 28, 2008
540
35
True that... Disinfectant has gone a while since it has had an update.

But on a real note, viruses were an issue with OS 9 and earlier. I don't think any new ones are in the wild, though.
 
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Fredn3ck

macrumors newbie
Jan 24, 2015
28
13
USA
There are no viruses in the wild for neither OSX or iOS, so I recommend none.

True that... Disinfectant has gone a while since it has had an update.

But on a real note, viruses were an issue with OS 9 and earlier. I don't think any new ones are in the wild, though.

Sorry folks I can't stand it any more!

There ARE viruses out there in the wild for MAC's. If you don't keep your machine up to date who knows what evil lurks? Be sure the appropriate little boxes are checked in the App Store under System Preferences so you receive the updated malware definitions.

Apple has a built-in rudimentary anti-malware scanner that runs in the background called XProtect. I just checked my machine using OnyX and there are currently 49 malware definitions loaded.

Ok, I feel much better now :)
 
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Samuelsan2001

macrumors 604
Oct 24, 2013
7,729
2,153
Sorry folks I can't stand it any more!

There ARE viruses out there in the wild for MAC's. If you don't keep your machine up to date who knows what evil lurks? Be sure the appropriate little boxes are checked in the App Store under System Preferences so you receive the updated malware definitions.

Apple has a built-in rudimentary anti-malware scanner that runs in the background called XProtect. I just checked my machine using OnyX and there are currently 49 malware definitions loaded.

Ok, I feel much better now :)

Malware is not a virus....
 
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Micky Do

macrumors 68020
Aug 31, 2012
2,207
3,149
a South Pacific island
You might like to read this; check out the Mac Help menu:

http://www.mac-nz.com

I have used Sophos, which took a couple of days to check out my six year-old Mac Mini. It found no threats, and just a handful of issues. I left it operating in the background for a bit, but found it slowed things down by quite a bit, so I uninstalled it. I just keep up on all the security updates, and have never had a problem.
 

Fredn3ck

macrumors newbie
Jan 24, 2015
28
13
USA
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charlyham

macrumors regular
Jun 30, 2012
165
30
Adwaremedic has been recommended on this site by many users. It can be used to remove the annoying web browser hijackers, Ad Popups, etc. MalwareBytes just acquired it and renamed it to Malwarebytes for Mac. It doesn't scan in realtime so there are no resources used unless you run it.
http://www.adwaremedic.com/index.php
 
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SlashZero

macrumors newbie
Feb 28, 2012
6
1
Moab
Thank you Charleyham and Fredneck, another vote here for Malwarebytes - https://www.malwarebytes.org/ Yes there is a free version.
A good reason to run Malware protection on a Mac (Malware covers viruses and the whole spectrum of crap) is PEACE of MIND! It's not called Anti Virus any more it's called Malware.
>Did you happen to search the forums to see if this topic has come up before? It has.< Damn I dislike statements like this. Technology is changing faster than you can search. GL.
 
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Fredn3ck

macrumors newbie
Jan 24, 2015
28
13
USA
For the short term future I think we are still relatively safe as long as you keep your machine up to date and do not run java script in your browser on only the most trusted web sites.
In the long term it is inevitable that we will all be running some form of Anti-Malware due to the continued popularity of Mac computers becoming more of a target for the hacking community.

Until the current dynamics of the situation change I seek tranquility in the old fashioned backing up of all my junk whilst savoring a few sips of Scotch and puffing on my favorite cigar.

Hackers be Hacking (that includes your friendly neighborhood NSA), Cheers :D
 
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